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Reporting CATs results

STEP 7. Analyze the data

Analyze your student feedback by reading the responses and categorizing them. It is generally advisable to use your central questions as a starting point to develop categories. Other categories may emerge as you read through the responses. Be sure to examine the entire range of responses. For CATs that have correct/incorrect answers, for example, sort responses into three groups: correct/complete, somewhat correct/complete, and incorrect/incomplete and then examine the reasons why students were incorrect. Focus on how the whole class is learning rather than the performance of individual students.   How to analyze data from the nine most common and easy to use CATs is presented here (pdf).   

For a complete description of analysis techniques for all 50 CATs, refer to Angelo and Cross (1993).  

STEP 8. Make conclusions

Draw conclusions based on your analysis. How do the results answer the central questions upon which the assessment was based? What can you do to improve learning based upon the feedback results? What changes in student behavior do the results suggest? What changes in instruction do the results suggest? How to generate conclusions from data based on the nine most common and easy to use CATs is presented here (pdf).

For a complete description of generating conclusions from data based on all 50 CATs, refer to Angelo and Cross (1993).  

STEP 9. Report results

A key component of this method is completing the feedback loop by sharing results with students. Let students know what you've learned and how you will use the results. Discuss with students what they can do to improve their learning. Use results to focus instruction. For example, you may report to students, "Forty percent of you thought X was the 'muddiest point' and about a quarter of you mentioned Y. Let's review each of these points."

Page last updated: Sep 21 2011
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