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APPENDIX G: INFORMATION RESOURCES STRATEGIC PLAN

 
Strategic Plan
Next Appendix

Department of Telecommunications Strategic Plan for Information Resources

Academic Computing and Instructional Technology Services Strategic Plan for Information Resources

Administrative Computing Services Strategic Plan for Information Resources



DEPARTMENT OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS
STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES

2001-2005

I. Executive Summary

Information Resources at The University of Texas at Austin are provided by three major entities:
 


This plan addresses the Department of Telecommunications’ portion of this overall support.  Since its origins in the 1930s, these voice and overall infrastructure functions have existed within the organization of the Vice President for Business Affairs.  Now, as part of a major University reorganization, the providers of these services will soon be combined with the data networking group of ACITS and will report along with ACITS and ACS to a newly created Vice President for Information Technology.

A part of the University's Information Resource Goal is the provision of telecommunications services and infrastructure to support the University's mission “to be a university of the first class through excellence in teaching, research, and public service.” The IR providers on the University campus, including those providing voice telecommunications and physical infrastructure, must be committed to providing resources and services which complement faculty and staff efforts to achieve this goal.

The major initiatives for the Department of Telecommunications during this period include participation in joint planning and implementation of service delivery, the use of new technology  and the appropriate provisioning of new and renovated facilities and infrastructure to meet the University’s needs.

This activity must be planned in accordance with funding availability and may be extensive enough to require funds beyond those available through the existing cost recovery model.
 

Table 1: Goals, Objectives and Strategies

Agency Goal A - Provide institutional support and ancillary services to students, faculty, and staff
Agency Goal B - Provide Infrastructure Support
Agency Goal C - Provide Special Item Support
 

Item Description
IR Goal #1 Provide telecommunications services to support the University's institutional needs for faculty, staff, and on-campus students.
Objective #1 Operate, upgrade and expand the Campus telephone system and associated services to meet user needs.
Strategy #1
Meet needs for additional capacity and features through the upgrading of existing hardware and/or the addition of line and trunk equipment.
Strategy #2
Maintain operating system currency through regular generic software and associated hardware upgrades.
Strategy #3
Evaluate new service delivery technologies, such as IP Telephony, and prepare to integrate into campus system.
Strategy #4
Pursue replacement of existing voicemail system with state-of-the-art, standards based, unified messaging system.
Objective #2 Provide enhanced disaster prevention and recovery for the Campus Telephone system and associated services.
Strategy
Upgrade two existing remote switching sites to allow them to have direct trunking to the local exchange carrier. Telephones served by these switching centers would have service in the event of a catastrophic event at the Host site.
Goal #2 Provide Telecommunications Infrastructure to meet the needs of all of the campus IR providers.
Objective #1 Optimize the use of the existing inter-building facilities, copper and optical fiber, to meet current needs.  Follow this with the installation of media to meet long-term needs consistent with a campus-wide Network Master Plan.
Strategy #1
Consolidate smaller copper cables into larger pair counts to more efficiently use pathways, thus providing space for new media.  Add metallic facilities only as needed to meet foreseeable requirements.
Strategy #2
While awaiting a master plan, continue the orderly installation of single mode fiber to meet immediate and foreseen networking needs.
Strategy #3
Where cost effective or required for other reasons, use electronic multiplexing over existing copper or fiber in lieu of additional facilities.
Objective #2 Provide intra-building cabling and distribution systems to allow full exploitation of the campus networks capabilities.
Strategy #1
Install in a timely, and cost efficient manner, the copper (unshielded twisted pair -UTP) or fiber required to bring the capabilities of the campus telecommunications network to the desktop.
Strategy #2
Actively monitor the work of wiring/cabling standards organizations to insure that the University uses the longest-term solution for new building distribution systems.
Goal #3  Provide support as need for specific special items.
Objective Insure that both the physical infrastructure and the switching and processing capabilities remain technologically current and possess the capacity for meeting unforeseen needs in a timely manner.
Strategy #1
Insure that excess capacity is available in critical systems and wiring routes. This includes line connections on a switching system, cable pair in and between buildings, and fiber between major points.
Strategy #2
Provide advanced capabilities in switching, routing, call processing and messaging to meet user needs. 

Table 2: Information Resources Policies and Practices
 

Category Brief Summary/Overview 
IR Priorities The management of IR Priorities falls into two areas; the provision of voice services, and the provision of campus infrastructure for all services. Voice services including local and long distance telephone and voicemail are driven by user demand and needs. Planning and implementation for optical fiber and copper inter-building infrastructure and for building wiring systems is strongly influenced by user need, but it is also standards driven. Implementation schedules are determined by inter-departmental agreement and, frequently, as a result of decisions of the University’s Information Technology Coordinating Committee (ITCC).
IR Planning Methodology For many years, the provision of telephone and related services has been driven by the goal of providing the service the user needs at the lowest possible cost. The system has been managed to minimize user costs while maintaining consistency with good engineering and maintenance practices. As this plan is being written, a major organizational restructuring of Information Technology at the University has been announced. This change will formalize the ad hoc relationship that has existed between the various service providers and further enhance their ability to meet future needs in a more consistent way and without duplication of effort.
Operating System The principal electronic system in the Telecommunications Department is a Nortel Networks MSL-100 central office type switch.   Its operating system is Nortel proprietary, and as of this document, the system is at generic release MSL-11.  The operating systems used on servers and personal computers include Windows/DOS, Macintosh, and Unix.  A more detailed listing of these is shown in Table 3, Platforms, Systems and Telecommunications.
Development Methodology This item is not applicable to Telecommunications.
Software Audit and management The management of software right-to-use on the telephone switching platforms is performed by the system manufacturer.  The monitoring of desktop software activity is provided by the departmental computer support staff.
Quality Assurance Practices Quality assurance as typically associated with IT projects has not been applicable to the Telecommunications Department. The implementation of additional services or system capabilities might be considered to be a “project,” but typically such additions or changes are handled as simple additions of vendor-supplied hardware and software to existing systems or as the application of off-the-shelf solutions to immediate or near-future needs. An informal needs analysis is performed by analysts or engineers, and budgets and timelines are developed.  Expenditures are monitored and final test results and performance are monitored to guarantee compliance with applicable specifications.  Within this department, the term Quality Assurance is more usually linked to the performance of personnel and equipment in meeting users’ expectations and service requirements.  The tools used for this purpose include internal analysis of work order completion times and customer satisfaction surveys.  The technical performance of the switching and transmission systems is monitored against established manufacturer and industry standards.
E-Government Not applicable to Telecommunications.
Change Control Software change control is not a function of this department; however, records keeping for switch and facilities utilization is taken very seriously.
Security Both password and physical security limit local access to software on the switching systems, and remote access is protected via multi-level passwords or authorization codes.  Access to the long distance network is limited by authorization codes, which require additional security digits when used remotely.  Desktop and server applications are provided with password and physical access protection.
Geographic Information Systems Not applicable to Telecommunications.
Disaster Recovery/ Business 
Continuity Planning
Telephone systems have traditionally relied on disaster prevention, but in a campus environment and with today’s distributed processing architecture, it is possible to achieve an enhanced recovery capability.  In addition to having parallel and redundant electronics in all common areas of the switching fabric and on-line battery plants with generator back up for power, it is now possible to add alternative physical routing of local and long distance service connections to the prevention and/or recovery equation. 
An image tape of the software load in the switch and a copy of the cable and facilities database are stored away from the switchroom.
An essential telecommunications link between the main campus and the Pickle Research Campus is now on protected optical fiber with the older microwave system available as an additional back up.
As the reorganization of IT at the University is completed, applicable disaster recovery and business continuity planning will also be integrated across the entire IT environment. 
The services of the West Texas Disaster Recovery Operations Center (WTDROC) or Austin Disaster Recovery Operations Center do not appear to be applicable to this user.
Resource Use This department is a supplier of voice resources and does dictate use.
Contract/Consultant With the exception of an ITCC joint effort to produce a campus-wide Network Master Plan, Telecommunications does not employ outside consultants.  Contract labor has been used to augment installation and outside facilities staff, but an effort is underway to reduce the reliance on outside resources.
Information Sharing All data, except that governed by non-disclosure or other proprietary arrangements, is available to others as needed.  There are no formal sharing agreements in place at this time.
Training and Continuing 
Education
Training for technicians is provided primarily by vendors and manufacturers.  Seminars and user organization conferences provide current information to management and staff.  The services of on-campus organizations are used for personnel development and to familiarize staff with other University services.
Data Center Operations Not Applicable to Telecommunications.

Table 3: Agency Platforms, Systems, and Telecommunications
 

Agency Platforms and Systems
CATEGORY
TYPE
OPERATING SYSTEM
DATABASE MGMT. SYSTEM
CAPACITY/SIZE/COUNT
COMMENTS/ DESCRIPTIVE INFORMATION
Minicomputer
Universe 68
BSD Unix
N/A 
1
Modular Command security system.
Server
IBM
AIX Unix
PROGRESS RAIMA
1 server
1 RS/6000 server, MySoft COMPCO MySoft Telephone Services Mgmt Client/Server system and Host/Server system
Server
IBM
AIX Unix
N/A
1 server
1 RS/6000 server, page-serv Intranet Web Server system
Server
COMPAQ
Windows NT
MS SQL
2 servers
Andover Controls Building & Security Mgmt system
Server
Logic Approach
Windows NT
SYBASE
1 server 
Cable-Mastercable tracking system
Server
Macintosh
Mac OS 10.0
N/A
1 server
Telephone server, backups, file sharing, FileMaker Pro server
Workstations
COMPAQ
IBM OS/2
N/A
3
Andover Controls network
Workstations
DELL 
Win 98
N/A 
13
Desktops, MySoft Workstations w/FileMakerPro clients, Word, Excel, Eudora, browser, telnet TN3270
Workstations
Login Approach
Win 95
N/A 
23
Desktops, MySoft Workstations w/FileMaker Pro clients ,Word ,Excel, Eudora, browser, telnet TN3270
Workstations
Macintosh
Mac OS 8.x 
N/A 
34
Desktops, MySoft Workstations w/ FileMaker Pro clients, Word, Excel, Eudora, browser, telnet TN3270, Aldus PageMaker (1)
Portables
Macintosh
Mac OS 8.x 
N/A
4
Powerbooks w/ FileMaker Pro clients, Word, Excel, Eudora, browser, telnet TN3270
Portables
Various
Win 9x Win NT
N/A
4
Laptops w/ FileMaker Pro clients, Word, Excel, Eudora, browser, telnet TN3270

 
Telecommunications Information
Category
Type 
Capacity/Size/Count
Comments/Descriptive Information
Telephone Switching System (PBX)
Nortel Networks MSL-100
22 000 lines,
900 trunks
Central Office type switch with remotes at strategic locations on campus(s).
Telephone Switching System (PBX)
Nortel Networks M-1
3 PBXs approx, 
100 lines each
Smaller PBX providing service at off-campus locations. Integrated dialing plan, trunking and voicemail via PRI connection to MSL-100
Hubs
Allied Telesyn
24 Port 10Base T hub
Hub Routers & Switches
Cisco Systems 4000 
1
2 GigabitEthernet ports, 80 10/100B T ports
Hub Routers & Switches
Cisco Systems 2924
2
 
Internet Service Provider
UTNET
N/A
 

Table 4. Agency Databases
 

Database Name
MySoft
Database Description
Database used for Telecommunications Management. It contains records of telecommunications users, equipment, services, account data, work orders, long distance activity and other transactions.  This is the heart of the MySoft Telecom Management product from COMPCO.
Database System
Progress 8.38
Estimated Physical Storage Requirements
3 GB
GIS Data Classification
No GIS conversion or access is available
Sharing
Server based with clients limited to the Telecommunications Department.
Future
This system has been in full service for one year.  Future enhancements include switch integration, trouble reporting and directory lookup.
 
 
Database Name
Telecommunications Facilities Records (Cable)
Database Description
Detailed records of copper and optical fiber facilities serving the campus.  The system uses the Cable-Master product from The Angeles Group.
Database System
Sybase 5
Estimated Physical Storage Requirements
2 GB
GIS Data Classification No.
GIS conversion or access is available
Sharing
The new version is a server-based product with clients onlyin Telecommunications.
Future
System has been in use since 1989 and is in process of upgradeto version NN.  There is a possibility of including this functionin the MySoft system, but there are no plans to move at this time.
Database Name
Infinity
Database Description
FCMS and Security monitoring and control using Andover Controls Infinity product.
Database System
MS SQL 6.5
Estimated Physical Storage Requirements
2.5 GB
Sharing
Used by UT Austin Telecommunications and Physical Plant. No access outside the campus.
Future
Major expansion anticipated to integrate legacy systems and new buildings.

Table 5: Agency Applications
 

UNIX Servers
 
Compilers
C (vendor supplied )
Interactive Interfaces
All the standard shells, sh, ksh, csh, Common shells, bash, tcsh Window Systems (X-Windows) X11R5
Languages
Perl
Common Desktop Environment 
(CDE 1.0)
Motif
Text Editors
Standard UNIX editors (ed, ex, vi, emacs), Simple X11-based editors.
Database Software 
Grep, awk, Raima, Progress
Integrated Packages
MySoft server
Electronic Mail
Common user mail agents (Berkeley mail, xmail)
WWW Services 
Netscape 4.7
Remote Login
Telnet
File Transfer Software
FTP
 
 
Apple Server
Database Software
Claris Filemaker Pro 4.0v3, Filemaker Pro Server 3.x
Network Software
Appleshare IP 6x
Network Backups
Retrospect 4.2
Electronic Mail
Eudora 3.1.3
WWW Services
Netscape 4.7
Remote Login
Telnet
File Transfer Software
Fetch
 
 
Windows NT Servers
 
Database Software
MS SQL 6.5 (2 Andover servers), Sybase SQLAnywhere 5.0 (CABLE server)
Integrated Packages
Andover Infinity server (2 Andover servers), Angeles Group Cable-Master (Cable server)
Backup software
Seagate Backup Exec 2.0
WWW Services
Netscape 4.7
Remote Login
Telnet
File Transfer Software
WSFTP
Remote Control Software
PC Anywhere (Cable server)
 
 
OS/2 Workstations
 
Integrated Packages
Andover SX8000 2.16 client
Database Software
MS SQL 6.5 client
Network Software
IBM LAN MAN 1.0
Backup software
Seagate Backup Exec 2.0
Remote Control Software
Danware Data NetOP 1.0 (3 platforms)
 
 
Departmental Desktop Applications
 
Database Applications
Claris FileMaker Pro 4.0v3 (pc and mac platforms)
Network Backups
Retrospect 4.2
Word Processing
MS Word 97 (pc) MS Word 98 (mac)
Desktop Publishing
Aldus Pagemaker 6.5 (one mac)
Integrated Packages
MySoft client (pc), ON Technology MeetingMaker v6.0
Spreadsheet Applications
MS Excel v97 (pc), v98 (mac)
Presentation Software
MS PowerPoint v97 (pc) 98 (mac)
Graphics Software
Adobe Photoshop 4.0, MacDraft, ClarisCAD or Vellum (on 3 macs)
Electronic Mail
Eudora Pro 6.5
WWW Services 
Netscape 4.7
Mainframe Software
SDI Bermuda Lmt TN3270Plus (pc), EncryptedTN3270 (mac)
Remote Login
Telnet
File Transfer Software 
WSFTP (pc), Fetch (mac)
Remote Control Software
PCAnywhere (3 pc), Timbuktu (2 mac)

Table 6: Interagency Data Needs
 

List
Other than numbering plan information which may be useful to theTex-AN system, there is very little in these databases that would be of interest or benefit to other state agencies or universities.
Obstacles
N/A
Needed Assistance
N/A


ACADEMIC COMPUTING AND INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY SERVICES
STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES

2001-2005













I. Executive Summary

The University of Texas at Austin office of Academic Computing and Instructional Technology Services (ACITS) provides information technology services to University students, faculty, and staff, to the UT System component institutions and, through interagency contracts, to eligible federal, state, and municipal governmental agencies.

A goal of The University of Texas at Austin is to continue to pursue high standards of achievement in instruction, student performance, research, and scholarly achievement.  Access to state-of-the-art academic and research information resources by students, faculty, and staff is one of the most important components in providing an environment conducive to achieving this goal.  To provide the academic information resources environment that will be required during the next five years, ACITS will concentrate efforts in the following areas:
 


Table 1:  Goals, Objectives and Strategies
Using the guidelines established in the Agency Strategic Plan instructions, provide goals, objectives, strategies, and action items for the Information Resources function within the agency.

Agency Goal A -- Provide Institutional Support and ancillary services to students, faculty, and staff
Agency Goal B -- Provide Infrastructure Support
Agency Goal C -- Provide Special Item Support
 

Item
Description
IR Goal #1
Provide state-of-the-art information technology services and infrastructure to the students, faculty, and staff of the  University.  This goal is directly related to Agency Goals A, B, C.   In addition, this IR Goal directly supports the mission, guiding principles and goals  1 through 3 and especially goal 4 of the 1999 "State Strategic Plan for Information Resources …"
Objective #1
Develop academic computing infrastructure and services to support state-of-the-art information resources environment.
Strategy #1
Develop requirements for distributed information technology facilities with representatives of University colleges and departments.
Strategy #2
Upgrade current services and replace obsolete systemswith state-of-the-art, standards-based systems.
Strategy #3
Develop high speed campus-wide network capabilities based on open systems and consonant with campus information resource requirements.
Strategy #4
Develop facilities management services ensuring the integrityof distributed information technology resources operated by various departments.
Strategy #5
Develop a University-wide database technology strategy in conjunction with Administrative Computing Services and the General Libraries.
Strategy #6
Expand multimedia based technologies in instruction and research.
Strategy #7
Incorporate appropriate new technologies into the Help Desk to support distributed information technology resources.
Strategy #8
Negotiate software and equipment discounts applicable to campus and UT System-wide environments and operate on-campus distribution.
Objective #2
Expand and upgrade public-access information resources.
Strategy #1
Continue to expand capacity and support for information access via the World Wide Web.
Strategy #2
Continue the expansion and enhancement of University-wide electronic mail services.
Strategy #3
Upgrade and expand departmental and University-wide desktop workstation facilities.
Objective #3
Design and deploy distributed computing and information environments based upon desktop workstations connected to the campus network.
Strategy #1
Develop recommended configurations with faculty, staff, and student service organizations.
Strategy #2
Develop or acquire systems to provide a consistent learning environment on or off campus.
Strategy #3
Incorporate support services for distributed workstations into customer service center.
Strategy #4
Develop a strategy to provide  students universal access to digital information resources.
Objective #4
Provide services and facilities that promote, support, and integrate digital-based technologies and instructional media in learning, teaching, and research.
Strategy #1
Continue operation of multimedia laboratories and consultingservices for faculty.
Strategy #2
Evaluate applicable information technology resources.
Strategy #3
Assist faculty in making effective use of technology-enhanced learning.
Strategy #4
Provide a database of distance education facilities and capabilities to assist faculty in locating appropriate resources.
Strategy #5
Promote the understanding and use of collaborative technologies that support asynchronous learning and provide students remote to the campus with learning opportunities.
Objective #5
Provide cost effective hands-on training to assist students, faculty, and staff in utilizing information resources.
Strategy #1
Upgrade and expand desktop and central server training facilities.
Strategy #2
Upgrade and integrate new information technologies into training curricula.
Strategy #3
Coordinate computer training courses with other campus providers.
Objective #6
Provide disaster recovery services to return vital information technology services to production in a fast and orderly manner with a minimumof impact to our customers.
Strategy #1
Maintain two computer rooms, each with HVAC, electrical power, and network connectivity capable of handling the addition of the other room’s equipment.  Each computer room is a “warm site” for the other.
Strategy #2
Maintain complete backups with off-site archives.
Strategy #3
Maintain services on standard, off-the-shelf vendor equipment. These systems, with few exceptions, run standard vendor software.
Strategy #4
Maintain each critical defined service on its own hardware.
Strategy #5
Maintain staff desktop systems on standard, off-the-shelf vendor equipment.
Strategy #6
Provide recovery of critical services, Web, list, mail and news to be back in production within 48 to 72 hours, depending on equipment availability.  Some services run simultaneously on the same equipment.
Strategy #7
Provide recovery for timesharing services to be back in production within 72 to 96 hours, depending on equipment availability.
Strategy #8
Provide recovery services for desktop computers to be operational within five working days, depending on equipment availability. During this time,, provisions would be made for staff to have access to sharing desktops for correspondence purposes.
Objective#7
Maintain a high performance research/technical computing facility that is state-of-the-art, to promote advancement of computational science and engineering.
Strategy#1
Provide advanced scientific and technical computing services to faculty, staff,  and students of the University,  in the form of vector shared memory multiprocessors and  parallel distributed-memory multicomputers.
Strategy#2
Provide associated scientific visualization systems, terabyte-to-petabyte-level archival storage systems, and high  performance networking infrastructure in support of usability of these high computational platforms.
Strategy#3
Pursue, in conjunction with faculty researchers, university, and state, commercial, and national funding opportunities for high performance computing services.
Objective #8
Formulate new university processes using information technology (called e-University).  This can include e-services, e-business, e-outreach, e-academics, and e-research.
Strategy #1
Form a management team to oversee new information technology initiatives that improve quality of service to faculty, staff, and students while increasing customer satisfaction and lowering costs.  This is done by changing administrative and business processes.
Strategy #2
Initiate development of a student portal to provide access to all student services and information through one gateway to the University.
Strategy #3
Evaluate reduction of the number of ID cards used on campus and develop an electronic credentialing process of students, faculty, and staff.  Investigate combining with dormitory dining dollar program and improved billing and collection processes.

Table 2:  Information Resources Policies and Practices
Use this table to provide a high-level view of the agency's information resources policies and practices. If appropriate, include references to internal agency documentation and/or supplemental information available on the agency's Web site.
 

Category 
Brief Summary/Overview
IR Priorities
The Information Technology Advisory Committee (ITAC)  was established to oversee the revenue generated from the $6 per semester credit hour information technology fee (est. $7M per year).  The information technology fee is used to fund  academic IT projects proposed by colleges and ACITS via their vision plans.   ITAC  reviews  the vision plans  and allocates funds to fund IT projects that are especially high priority for the college and the agency.
IR Planning Methodology
Planning for academic information technology activity at UT Austin is now being done by the Information Technology Coordinating Council (ITCC), which was formed in late 1997. The membership of the ITCC includes key decision-makers from various sectors of the campus who identify, prioritize, and resolve information technology issues within the context,of a comprehensive long-range IT plan. Several task forces have emerged from the ITCC, including groups to study and report on the accessibility of electronic information, digital library data standards, electronic IDs, multimedia in the classroom, and a network master plan for UT Austin. A comprehensive, integrated, long-range plan for IT was developed previously and ratified by the ITCC in 1998, and a new planning effort will be initiated in 2000-2001.  In 1999, ACITS and ACS staff and other campus IT leaders participated in an all-day strategic planning session to outline the goals and directions for their respective organizations  for the next several years. Task force discussions and the formulation of initiatives from those sessions are still in progress.
Operating System
Staff use commercial off-the-shelf software such as Word, Excel, and PowerPoint.  Database software is provided by Oracle and Cold Fusion.  Multimedia software utilized includes Adobe, Quick Time, Dreamweaver, Java, Macromedia, Real, and Flash.  Mail software includes Outlook and Eudora.  Both Unix and NT are used in server installations (see Table 5 for more complete information).
Development Methodology
Very little software development activity is done in Academic Computing; most software is purchased.
Software Audit and Management
Detailed inventory records are kept on department software licenses.  ACITS reviews all software contracts and licenses annually.  This ensures that there are no licenses for software being paid for which are not in current, active use.  Software acquisition is managed by the Software Distribution group.  All software license costs are negotiated by an Associate Director of ACITS, who oversees this group.
Quality Assurance Practices
Major applications are reviewed and approved through appropriate testing before being placed in production.  Technical designs are reviewed through a cross-group team to ensure that all aspects are considered.
E-Government
The University has recently undertaken a campus-wide"e-University initiative".  This initiative will result in the delivery of all services in a Web-based customized individualized portal for each student, faculty, and staff member.  The portal will be used for thedelivery of all official university correspondence and communication. The University is highly committed to and is aggressively pursuing the new "e-business strategies" as a vehicle for improving service and reducing costs.
Change Control
ACITS utilized project management techniques including setting fixed deadlines and setting and communicating project goals and scope to interested parties.  This usually involves advisory groups from across the University.
Security
A comprehensive set of security measures are in place and tested on a regular basis.  The electronic identities of all students, faculty, and staff are obtained from a secure server and are based on EIDs. If the constituent does not have one, then access to the service is denied.  Further the University is aggressively pursuing PKI (Public Key Infrastructure)and Smart Card initiatives.  Already in pilot projects, these initiatives will result in the use of digital certificates and signatures for the transmission of official University documents.
Geographic Information Systems
N/A
Disaster Recovery/Business 
Continuity Planning
ACITS plans to put in place a more comprehensive disaster-recovery plan. One concern is how quickly ACITS could procure replacement equipment. ACITS will work with the UT Purchasing Office to  understand what rules will prevail in a disaster-recovery case.   ACITS will acquire a letter of commitment from the University administration as to monies for emergency purchases. Due to the way we have implemented our services with many smaller systems as opposed to a large scale system getting replacement systems in place in a timely manner is much easier.  Vendors have indicated they  are willing to make a "best effort"  in case of disaster. 

ACITS currently has a "warm site" in the Commons Bldg. at the Pickle Research Center that will support computer equipment, namely sufficient electrical power, HVAC, and Internet access to support our existing computer equipment. 

Because of the rapid change in the computer business, we do not feel that it would be an economical use of financial resources to duplicate equipment for use in  case of emergency. However, because of the nature of one of our most critical services, the Web server, it may be possible to split the system so as to reside in two locations. An impact study as to network traffic patterns must be conducted before this could be implemented.

Resource Use
ACITS makes full use of a variety of electronic resources, especially the World Wide Web.  A master plan for the network infrastructure is being developed to stay ahead of the increasing demand for high bandwidth.  Staff fully utilize the voice, data, and video network facilities of the University as required.
Contract/Consultant
N/A
Information Sharing 
This is not applicable to ACITS.
Training and Continuing Education
ACITS relies on its systems operations and applications experts to determine the kind and amount of training staff require to hold a technical position.  Further, all Help Desk and Departmental Services staff are required to take training provided by group managers.  Help Desk and Departmental  Services staff are tested for effectiveness of training.   All training, especially that which is external to UT Austin and which requires travel, is carefully monitored.  Trainees are required to report to senior staff on training workshops.
Data Center Operations
During the past two years, the University has had several reviews and discussions with the operators (Northrup-Grumman)of the WT/DROC facility concerning the transfer of operational support for the IT resources of administrative computing.  In the last such discussion, the size of the University's administrative IT environment was such that it challenged the upper capacity limit of the WT/DROC resources. However, the University will continue to review this situation for appropriateness and timing.  The University remains committed to the principles of reducing IT costs and leveraging state-wide economies of scale while ensuring no disruption of service to its students, faculty, and staff.

Table 3:  Agency Platforms, Systems, and Telecommunications
 
 

 AgencyPlatforms and Systems
CATEGORY 
TYPE
OPERATING   SYSTEM
DATABASE MGMT. SYSTEM
CAPACITY/SIZE/
COUNT
COMMENTS/DESCRIPTIVE INFORMATION
Mainframes
Cray T3E-AC88
UNICOS/mk 2.0.5.23 
N/A 
52.8 Gflops 
88PE, 128mb memory/PE, 600Mflops/PE (supercomputers for scientific computations)
Mainframes
Cray SV1-1A
UNICOS 10.0.0.6
N/A 
19.2 Gflops 
16CPUs, 16384 Mbytes memory, 1200Mflops/CPU
Mainframes
IBM SP
AIX 4.3 
N/A
40.9 Gflops
64 Nodes, 128mb memory/node, 640Mflops/Node
Server
SGI Origin 2000
IRIX 6.5 
N/A
N/A
4 CPUs, 2000 Mbytes memory, Data Archive File Server
Tape Robot
Storage Tek Timberwolf 9710 
N/A
N/A
30 Tbytes
10 DLT7000 tape drives, Cartridge capacity of 500, 30 Tbyte storage capacity
Minicomputer
Sun Microsystems
Solaris 2.5
N/A
N/A
Sun 4/670-256, server for staff support
Minicomputer
Sun Microsystems
Solaris 2.5
N/A 
N/A
Sun 4/670-256, server for staff support
Minicomputer
OpenVMS:(DIGITAL)
•AS 2100 4/275
•AS 2100 4/200
•DEC 1000A5/333
OpenVMS v6.2
OpenVMS v6.2
OpenVMS v7.2
N/A
(TPC-B) 308.80174.21n/a
8 Servers
UTXVMS node violet 
UTXVMS node yellow
PRS node okra
Server
WNT Services: (Dell, Intel, Micron)
Windows NT 
WNT 4.0
MS SQL
   
WAN Servers
Mail, Web, DNS Servers, Etc. 
Primary O/S used
Primary
DBMS used
0
 
Server
IBM 
AIX
ORACLE
1 server 
1 server, ADS, ginger timesharing systems
Server
Sun 
Solaris
None
1 server
USENET news, geraldo, includes SSA
Server
Sun
Solaris
None
1 server
mailing Lists, mcfeeley
Server 
DEC
Digital UNIX
None
1 million hits/day
4 servers, Web Central
Server
Network Appliance
ONTAP
None
62 Gbytes 
Software Distribution Services
Workstation
NCD
NCDware
None
20 workstations
X-terminals including lab
Server 
Sun
Solaris
None
1 server
10 clients, staff server
Server
DEC
Digital UNIX
None
3000 users
2 servers, UTS, curly moe time sharing system
Standalone PC Workstations
Sun
  Solaris 2.5
N/A
10 
SS II, Sparc 5(2), SS 10
Standalone PC Workstations
Macintosh
Mac OS 7.5
N/A 
5
PPC 7600, PPC 8200,  Quadra 700,  MacIIsi (2)
Standalone PC Workstations
Dell
Windows NT
N/A
3
 
Server
Sun
Solaris
None
100-200 users
1 server CCWF,  piglet time sharing system

 
Telecommunications Information
CATEGORY
TYPE
CAPACITY/
SIZE/
COUNT 
COMMENTS/DESCRIPTIVE INFORMATION
Hubs
Cabletron
  1 
24 port 10BaseT hub
Hubs 
Allied Telesin
1,200
 
Hub Routers & Switches (Remote)
Ascend GRF-400 Giga Router
1
Supports HIPPI, ATM, FDDI, 10/100 Ethernet
Hub Routers & Switches (Remote)
Cisco Systems
380
 
Remote Bandwidth Analog
Southwestern Bell/Time Warner
3,200
 
Remote Bandwidth Digital T1
N/A 
500
 
Remote Bandwidth ISDN (BRI)
N/A
20
 
DTE/End User Equipment Arrangement 
Workstations, LANs, Mainframe Devices, Other 
34,000
 
Supported Protocols
TCP/IP
N/A
 
Internet Service Provider
AT&T, Qwest (Via TEX-AN 2000)
N/A
 
Shared Network
General Services Commission, Texas A&M University
N/A 
Also have access to vBNS

Table 4.  Agency Database
Identify major agency databases critical to the administration or service of the agency's mission and briefly describe their uses. This includes internal administrative databases, but excludes simple databases used in the support of administrative functions (for example, phone lists and address directories). Provide the following information for each database.
 

UT Person
Faculty, staff,  and students officially affiliated with UTAustin.
Database Description
Database of faculty, students, staff of UT Austin, as well as individuals with special relationships (vendors, visitors, etc.).
Database System 
MS SQL Server 6.5
Estimated Physical Storage Requirements
275 MB Application
GIS Data Classification
No GIS conversion or access is available
Sharing
Data are derived from other databases in the agency.  UT Person is not shared outside ACITS.
Future
UT Person will continue to be an essential database for ACITS accounting functions, account acquisition, authorization, and authentication.
 
 
ENAB
Database Description
Database of student resumes
Database System
MS SQL Server 6.5
Estimated Physical Storage Requirements
275 MB Application
GIS Data Classification
No GIS conversion or access is available
Sharing
Data is for use by College of Engineering students and for authorized recruiters.
Future
 
 
 
Visual Resource Collection 
 
Database Description
Database of slide catalog information. Currently only text is stored.
Database System
MS SQL Server 6.5
Estimated Physical Storage Requirements
1 GB
GIS Data Classification
No GIS conversion or access is available.
Sharing
Data is for use by Visual Resource Collection.
Future
Currently under development.

Table 5.  Agency Applications
Identify major software applications and provide a brief description of their uses. For this plan, major applications are those critical to the administration or service of the agency's mission. Provide the following information for each application.
 

Open VMS Systems
 
Programming FORTRAN, ADA, MACRO-32, Awk, FORTRAN-90, COBOL, BASIC, Pascal,  DEC C, C++.
Stat & Math
IMSL,  MapleV,  MATHEMATICA,  SAS, Minitab
Text Editors
EDT, ex/vi,  LSE,  EVE,  EMACS
Text Format
RUNOFF,  DECwrite,  TeX/LaTeX
Database
Rdb/VMS,  SAS,  DECwindows/Motif
Graphics
GKS,  SAS/Graph,  PHIGS,  RENDER
Other
Simulations,  Command,  IFPS,  Posix,  SIMAN
Conferencing
ANU NEWS
WNT Domain
 
Interative Interfaces
Interactive login to the WNT domain is providedvia Citrix WNT 3.51 for MacIntoshs, PCs and X-terminals
Client Services
Disk storage via Microsoft (MS “shares")
Database Applications
MS Sql Server and MS Access.  Publishing of databases to the Web via Cold Fusion
Office Applications
MS Office (Word, Excel,  Access, Power Point)
WWW Services
Publishing via MS Internet Information Server. Browsing via Netscape and MS Internet Explorer
E-mail
Netscape Mail,  MS Internet Explorer or MS Exchange
UNIX Servers
 
Compilers
Fortran77, Fortran 90, C (both vendor supplied and GNU compiler), Pascal C++ (both vendor and GNU compiler)
Interactive Interfaces
All the standard shells, sh, ksh, csh,  Commonshells, bash, tcsh  Window Systems (X-Windows) X11R5, ICA
Languages
Perl,  Java,  C, C++
Common Desktop Environment
(CDE 1.0)  Motif , OpenWindows (Sunmachines only), GNOME
Statistical Software
SAS, SPSS
Mathematical Software
Mathematica, Matlab, Maple, Cplex, Essl , IMSL Libraries Lisrel, prelis
Text Editors
Standard UNIX editors (ed, ex,  vi, emacs), Simple X11-basededitors
Database Software
Grep, awk, dbm, Oracle
Electronic Mail
Common user mail agents (pine, Berkeley mail, xmail, MH, Netscape), Pop and IMAP clients and services
Text Formatters
Troff, TeX ,  LaTeX ,Adobe Acrobat Reader
USENET News
rn, trn, Netscape, tin, IRC
WWW Services
Netscape, Lynx
Student Microcomputer Facility
 
Database Applications
Claris FileMaker Pro 3 (MAC and PC platforms)
Word Processing
MS Word 97 (PC), WordPerfect 7.0 (PC), MS Word 6.01(Mac 3.5, WordPerfect 6)
Desktop Publishing
Aldus Pagemaker 6.5 (both platforms)
Integrated Packages
ClarisWorks 4.0 (Mac and PC)
Spreadsheet Applications
Lotus 1-2-3 v97 (PS) v1.1 (Mac), MS Excelv97 (PC) 5.0 (Mac)
Presentation Software
MS PowerPoint v97 (PC) v4.0 (Mac), Freelance Graphics 97 (PC)
Graphics Software
Adobe Photoshop 4.0 (both) Deneba Canvas5 (both) Hypercard v2.3 Caere OniPage Pro 7.0 (both)
Math & Statistical
Maple V  Release 4, Mathematica 3.01, Matlab5.1,  Minitab 11 (pc)
Texas Advanced Computing Center
 
Programming 
Cray C,  C++,  Gnu C
Fortran 90
Portland Grp HPF
Fortran 90
Cray C, C++ , Gnu C
Statistical/Math
bcslib, bnchlib, fitpack, pde2d, libsci, slatec, imslib, itpackv, lsode minpack, nag, nagsml, nspcg
Batch Environment
NQS, RPC
Applications
ABAQUS, ACES2, AMBER, CADPAC, CHARMm, DeFT, FIDAP, FITPACK,GAMESS, Gaussian, IMS, L ITPACKV, libsci, Molpro, Mopac, MPI, MPT, NAG, NAGGRF, NAGSML, NACR graphics, NCSA, HDF, NSPCG, ODEPACK, PDE2D, PVM, RasMol, SLATEC, Spyglass Plot, Spyglass Transform, UniChem
Graphics
ncar, naggrf 

Table 6:  Interagency Data Needs
Describe the agency's plans for increased sharing of data with other state agencies. Indicate any obstacles in the way of further sharing.
 

List
N/A 
Obstacles
N/A
Needed Assistance
N/A


ADMINISTRATIVE COMPUTING SERVICES
STRATEGIC PLAN FOR INFORMATION RESOURCES

2001-2005







I. Executive Summary

As The University of Texas at Austin moves into the 21st Century, information technology and information resources are central to both the institution’s mission and its ongoing operation.  Administrative Computing Services’ (ACS) role is to provide the information technology infrastructure, tools, training, and support which will enable UT Austin to thrive, succeed, and excel in the environment of this new century.

ACS has made major strides in implementing leading edge client-server technologies in the areas of data warehousing, document imaging, the World Wide Web, and Electronic Data Interchange (EDI), among others.  Six different administrative and college-level data warehouses provide University executives with decision support. The University-wide Imaging Project is using electronic imaging technology to reduce processing costs while speeding processing time for a wide range of forms and documents.  The e-University Initiative will result in the delivery of a customized, personalized portal for every university constituent.

Building on this foundation, ACS’ vision is to create the finest administrative computing infrastructure in higher education.  To accomplish that vision, the following tables lay out an overall strategic plan comprised of four main areas of initiative:


All of ACS’ Information Resources (IR) goals provide extensive and broad-range support for the Texas IR Goals as expressed by the Department of Information Resources.  Specifically, this plan supports an integrated information resources infrastructure on the UT Austin campus and state-wide by promoting the sharing and re-use of data, services, and applications.  The plan supports and applies IR standards and guidelines adopted by the State of Texas.  It also facilitates interoperability through initiatives such as electronic commerce and adoption of standard processes.  Finally, virtually all elements of this plan are driven by recognition and understanding of user needs.

UT Austin’s strategic plan for Administrative Computing Services constitutes a blueprint for building on the foundation laid in the last few years to create an administrative information resources environment of the first class.  All of the initiatives presented in this plan are designed to ensure that UT Austin is operating at the highest levels of efficiency and is providing the citizens of the State of Texas with the best possible quality and value in higher education for their tax and tuition dollars.

Table 1: Goals Objectives and Strategies
 

Goals
Related Agency Goal
Related State IT Goal 
Objectives
Strategies
A.  Provide the computer resources for retention access and managementof official University records and for the efficient operation of official procedures. 
Supports Agency Goals: A, B 
Supports State IT Goal #3
A.1  Maintain sub-second response time on  95% ofall inquiries. 
A.1.1  Maintain sufficient CPU power to accommodate 30% yearly growth in CPU usage.
 
   
  A.2  Ensure the availability of administrative computing resources to a 99.5% degree of reliability.
A.2.1  Remain at the forefront of information technology to ensure reliable hardwareand software to develop and maintain systems, and to maximize direct services to the greatest number of clients.
 
     
A.2.2  Provide sufficient data storage capacity to meet demands of client development.
 
     
A.2.3  Work closely with Academic Computingand the Office of Telecommunication Services to maintain a reliable, robust, high speed network on campus.
     
A.3  Ensure security for access to administrative computing hardware for administrative computing. 
A.3.1  Maintain disaster recovery plan. 
       
A.3.2  Provide full security audit trails.
       
A.3.3  Monitor for security break-ins.
     
A.4  Maintain the highest standards of conduct and management for internal departmental operations. Provide the University with the maximum possible return from the resources with which ACS is entrusted by operating a healthy, effective, and efficient organization. 
A.4.1  Employ continuous assessment and improvement of management and operational practices and procedures
 
   
A.5  Promote direct service applications that interact with the ultimate end-user, arranging vendor discounts for campus-wide licensing, implementing dial-up and encrypted access via public networks, and FTP servers as well as providing personnel for administrative computing projects. 
A.5.1  Launch an "e-University Initiative" to develop a portal for customized delivery of services to every student,  faculty, and staff.
 
   
A.6  Maintain an up-to-date infrastructure and development environment for administrative information systems. 
A.6.1 Increase the size of the ACS Systems Programming staff in order to handle the demands of new platforms, operating systems, and development environments.
       
A.6.2  Systematically retire obsolete productsand aging systems.
     
A.7  Provide reliable quality service to the campus for administrative information systems. 
A.7.1  Improve communication with the campus on IT projects via use of Bulletin Board software.
       
A.7.2  Improve reliability of web-based services during peak processing and use times by adding capacity to webservers and moving toward a 99.99% uptime.
       
A.7.3  Implement new and improved quality assurance measures, techniques, and standards for all web-based applications.
B.  Advocate and develop applications which advance the University  toward its effort to adopt and incorporate eBusiness principles and strategies to transform administrative processes and services in order to obtain the maximum benefit from existing financial, human, and information resources and to gain a competitive advantage in acquiring new resources. 
Supports Agency Goals: A, B, D, E 
Supports State IT Goal #4
B.1  Provide fully electronic commerce for all transactions between students, faculty, staff and the University
B.1.1  Continue to provide secure connectivity between the academic and administrative computer systems.
       
B.1.2  Provide imaging capabilities campus-wide
       
B.1.3  Extend the functionality of the UT EID authentication system
     
B.2  Expand the range of applications available  to other University components, especially for all financial systems 
B.2.1 Make all new application systems "component sensitive" and re-engineer older systems to be component-sensitive.
       
B.2.2  Acquire new ID card technology including debit cards, building access cards, and smart cards.
     
B.3  Integrate purchasing system applications so that other UT components on our system may take better advantage ofcentral information resources.
B.3.1  Develop systems using new technology that will better assist the purchasing sector of the University interface with vendors wishing to do business with them.
     
B.4  Increase private sector funding from alumni and private donors. 
B.4.1  Advocate and develop strategic applications to support the University’s development efforts and to gain a competitive advantage in acquiring new resources.
       
B.4.2  Provide superior information management systems to fund raising offices of the University
     
B.5  Continue to decentralize printing to local printers.
B.5.1  Provide options within applications to download and FTP reports to local clients or servers.
       
B.5.2  Provide options within applications to print reports to local printers or route output via e-mail.
       
B.5.3  Provide the capability to print checks at certified offices
     
B.6  Promote and nurture eBusiness principles and re-engineering for campus information services.
B.6.1  Organize an eBusiness/eUniversity Task Force to oversee, promote, and champion the campus' move to adopt eBusiness strategies.
       
B.6.2  Develop and assemble eBusiness infrastructure components in order to assist campus developers in their efforts to create new web-based applications.
 
     
B.6.3  Re-design our infrastructure and tools for data warehousing in order to improve our data collection and statistical analysis of facts and trends related to business processes and practices.
     
B.7  Promote the use of HUB vendors for the purchase of  IT goods and services 
B.7.1  Within ACS attain the HUB goals established by the University.
       
B.7.2  Pro-actively search for and identify qualified HUB vendors to meet our IT needs.
C.  Enable all University offices to develop and easily publish the widest possible range of Web-based information and interactive services via a Portal infrastructure which supports personalized mass-customize dinteractions with all constituents. 
Supports  Agency Goals:  A, B
Supports State IT Goal #1
C.1  Design, develop and deploy a sophisticated Web publishing tool kit which enables individual University offices to create interactive, database-driven Web services from their own internal information with a minimum of training and expense.
C.1.1  Work with ACITS and other University service providers to select commercial tools, integrate custom features, provide infrastructure, and integrate documentation and training for a departmental Web publishing tool kit.
     
C.2  Expand the public applications accessibleto all students faculty, staff, and "external" constituents using the World Wide Web. 
C.2.1  Choose and prioritize public applications that provide maximum direct services to the greatest number of clients.
       
C.2.2  Increase the number of  public-access, Web-based services available to  make information about the University more accessible to students, faculty, staff, and the general public as they move around the campus
     
C.3  Implement the primary technologies that will being corporated into Administrative Computing over the next few years in the areas of the Web, Executive Information Systems, imaging, and interactive multimedia.  The tools for accomplishing this goal are reaching an advanced state of development and maturity in terms of their practical application in large, dynamic, mission-critical applications. 
C.3.1 Evaluate, select, acquire, and integrate new technologies that will deliver maximum benefit to administrative operations at the University.
     
C.4  Provide a substantially easier access and higher quality user interface for all types of Administrative applications.
C.4.1  Design, develop, and implement an integrated set of services and developer tools to enhance our web user interface
     
C.5  Improve our web interface by developing and promoting a consistent, reliable, easy-to-use web interface standard for all administrative information systems. 
C.5.1  Conduct focus groups of users from around campus to develop specifications for consistent user interface elements.
       
C.5.2  Create a "web interface" team charged with building components and templates that implement the consistent interface design.
D.  Develop leaders in the areas of administration, project management,and technology.  These efforts include initial and continuing technical education for programmers and analysts, as well as project management and leadership activities.
Supports  Agency Goals: B
Supports State IT Goal #2
D.1  Maintain a comprehensive education and training program. 
D.1.1  Enhance the programmer and systems analysis training programs
       
D.1.2  Train beginning programmers in business processes as well as technical aspects of programming and analysis.
       
D.1.3  Maintain an atmosphere of freedom, rooted in discipline that encourages innovation and rewards productivity
     
D.2  Enhance staff development efforts and continue efforts to retain skilled personnel through salary and benefit adjustments.
D.2.1  Recruit and retain the most qualified, skilled, and effective technical staff to develop leading edge Information Technology systems and services
       
D.2.2  Expand efforts to provide the highest quality training, support, and development opportunities for its staff; and ensure that salaries and benefits are competitive with market levels.
     
D.3  Ensure that the people we hire are capable of moving upward within the University. 
D.3.1  Hire people with strong communication skills and diverse business backgrounds.
     
D.4  Partner with campus IT organizations to provide leadership and guidance to the campus on technology issues. 
D.4.1 Host regular meeting of ACS and ACITS staff
 
     
D.4.2  Identify joint development projects with other campus IT providers.
       
D.4.3  Develop and maintain a database of current administrative IT projects and their status.  Expose this database to the web.
     
D.5  Improve and expand training for technical staff. 
D.5.1  Create a Senior Systems Analyst training and development program.
       
D.5.2  Add Senior Systems Analyst Training to our Education/Training Program.
       
D.5.3  Implement changes in our existing Information Analyst and Systems Analyst training to adapt the newly adopted eBusiness strategies.

Table 2:  Information Resources Policies and Practices
 

IR Priorities
Because of the distributed nature of application development, most priorities are set at the departmental level.  Each department employs and oversees its own IT development staff.  ACS has developed a Project Information Questionnaire to assist in setting project priorities for its own projects.  The answers to questions are assigned points and projects are evaluated and prioritized based on the total evaluation. This tool is used by ACS and is available to departments for their use. ACS management establishes priorities for ACS supported projects with guidance and approval from the Office of the Vice President for Business Affairs.
IR Planning 
Methodology
Objectives, strategies, and actions are proposed by project managers in departments around campus.  Departments set priorities based on the availability of their IT resources with consulting from ACS.  This plan is reviewed by ACS management and approved by the Information Resources Manager.  It is based on the mission statements of the University and the Administrative Computing Services department.
Operating System
The standard operating system of server-side applications is OS/390.  All server-side applications are written in NATURAL and all official University data is stored in production ADABAS databases. All on-line transaction processing and program development on the server is currently being done through the COM-PLETE teleprocessing monitor. Web application development uses the HP-UX operating system where HTML WebAgent and Java are standard.  Applications conform to ACS standards determined by the Standards Committee which ensures that applications maintain a similar "look and feel."  Within ACS the administrative staff uses WORD, EXCEL, and POWERPOINT.   DataWarehousing tools currently include Brio and ADABAS-D.
Development 
Methodology
Administrative Computing Services (ACS) uses the CASE tools and methodologies contained in our NATURAL application development environment and uses timeboxing and prototype methodologies to ensure timely and "according-to-specs" applications.  Object-Oriented design and development tools are being investigated and are in preliminary use in new development.
Software Audit 
and Management
ACS Management reviews all software contracts and licenses annually.  Further, detailed inventory records were collected and examined as part of our Year 2000 preparation. These reviews ensure that there are no licenses for software being paid for which are not in current, active use.  Finally, it should be noted that software is a significant part of the ACS operational budget, and hence demands constant review.  Every software contract has its own unique set of terms and conditions and they must be analyzed in detail before every hardware purchase decision.
Quality-Assurance 
Practices
Major applications are reviewed and approved through Alpha and Beta testing before being placed in production. Technical designs are reviewed through walkthroughs and approvals of database design.  The University's Internal Audit Office works closely with ACS on all new development projects to ensure that proper controls are in place and that due diligence is followed.
e-Government
In 1996, the University began to move aggressively towardthe delivery of direct customer services on the Web. Administrative ComputingServices developed a Web service tool kit which enabled all University offices and departments to deliver real-time, interactive Web services directly to their constituents, including students, faculty, and staff.  Because of this effort, the University already has over 250 direct customer Web services which meet many of the e-Government goals such as providing self-service solutions and 24x7 access to services.  The infrastructure to support these direct Web services includes: 1) an electronic identity system, 2) a Web-based credit card payment system, 3) real-time access to official University records and processes and, 4) comprehensive Web security. The security system has been audited by the accounting firm of Deloitte and Touche and has received a favorable SAS 70 audit report. The University has recently undertaken a campus-wide "e-University initiative" which builds on and extends existing direct services on the Web and will result in thedelivery of all services through a customized, individualized Web portal for all University constituents.  The portal will be used for the delivery of official University services, correspondence, and communications.  The first version of the Web Portal is scheduled for delivery in August 2000 with additional features and enhancements to be added throughout FY2000-01.

Within the e-University initiative, the University is aggressively pursuing an "e-business strategy" as a vehicle for improving service and reducing costs.  e-business is a complex fusion of business processes, enterprise software, and organizational structure necessary to create a high performance business model. e-business includes e-commerce, but is a broader concept encompassing the entire organizational structure. e-business is based on customer-centered, Internet-based communications and achieves new levels of operational efficiency by employing functional processes that span traditional boundaries within and among organizations. 

All of the e-University  initiatives are consistent with and supportive of the Electronic Government initiatives at the State level.  More information about the e-University initiative and the Web Portal project is available at the following Website: http://www.utexas.edu/e-University/.

Change Control
ACS applies Timebox project management philosophies, including setting fixed deadlines and setting and communicating project goals and scope to interested parties.  Additionally, all major Administrative applications are developed using JAD  (Joint Application Development) methodology and are user approved in an on-going manner.
Security
A massive, thorough DIR-required Information Security Risk Analysis was completed in Fall 1995.  A comprehensive set of rigorous security measures are in place and tested on a regular basis.  The electronic identities of all faculty and staff are obtained under a "high assurance"claiming vehicle.  The process consists of a face-to-face authentication of a human being, their claim to be a specific person and their possession of a government-issued photo ID corroborating the claim of identity. This "high assurance" UT- EID (called HA-EID) is required for all faculty and staff.  We encourage students to submit themselves to the high assurance claiming mechanism, but do not currently require it.  Rather, we are delivering services to students which require an "HA-EID". If the student does not have one, then access to the service is denied.

Further, the University is aggressively pursuing a PKI (Public Key Infrastructure) initiative.  Already in pilot projects, these initiatives will result in the use of digital certificates and signatures for the transmission of official University documents.

Geographic 
Information 
Systems
Administrative Computing Services does not currently have any plans to implement GIS.
 
In March 1998, ACS requested that Northrup Grumman conduct a review and analysis of the West Texas Disaster Recovery and Operations Center's (WT-DROC) capability and capacity to provide full support for UT Austin’s Administrative Computing needs for disaster recovery.  In April 1998, Northrup Grumman replied that the WT-DROC facility did not have sufficient capacity to meet the specified disaster recovery needs, and the Texas Department of Information Resources subsequently approved UT Austin’s Biennial Operating Plan (BOP), including disaster recovery plans which do not use WT-DROC. Documentation of this is available upon request.
Disaster Recovery/
Business Continuity
Planning
ACS does maintain a Disaster Recovery Plan which is updated each year and a disaster recovery test is conducted annually (last test December 1999).  The annual Disaster Recovery test is observed by the University's Internal Audit Office.  Sometimes it is scheduled and executed in conjunction with safety evacuations of buildings conducted by UT Police and the Austin Fire Department. Vendor maintenance agreements and vendor agreements for replacement of equipment in case of disaster are maintained.  Alternate University facilities equipment and assistance from Academic Computing and Instructional Technology Services (ACITS) at the University are available and part of the recovery plan.  ACS' three-site configuration for hardware location, tape back-up storage location, and its off-site storage facility location obviate the need for further disaster recovery services.  The University provides its own disaster recovery, and spends no state funds purchasing such services.
Resource Use
ACS makes full use of each type of media resource available, as the use of the World Wide Web and GUI projects expands.  Hardware network infrastructure is developed to stay ahead of the increasing demand for higher bandwidth.  ACS uses video conferencing to supplant the need for travel regularly.  Further, it fully utilizes the voice, data, and video network facilities of the University as required.
Contract / Consultant
Administrative Computing Services does not use contract programmers at this time.  All applications are developed by University personnel who have attended ACS's educational offerings.
Information Sharing
Six University of Texas System component institutions continue to use The University of Texas at Austin's Budget, Payroll, Accounting, and Purchasing applications.   They are UTSA, UTPB, UTEP, UT Arlington, UT Tyler, and UT System Administration.  Also the University's General Libraries' online card catalog is available to all state agencies and universities. Access to other library databases (e.g., IAC periodical indexes, MedLine, Psych-Info, MSDS, et. al.) have been (or are being) extended to other University of Texas component institutions.  UT-Austin houses one of the largest virtual library websites in the world, and actively shares that resource.
Training & Continuing 
Education
ACS lists one of its primary goals as development of leaders in administration, project management, and technology. Our staff teaches (and attends) a wide variety of courses dealing with technical and management topics. The Education and Training Section of ACS is expected to continue to grow and develop in the coming years as technology changes and new skills are needed.  ACS hires and trains about 35 new computer programmers/systems analysts every year.
Data Center Operations
During the past two years, the University has had several reviews and discussions with the operators (Northrup-Grumman) of the WT/DROC facility concerning the transfer of operational support for the IT resources of administrative computing.  In the last such discussion, the size of the University's administrative IT environment was such that it challenged the upper capacity limit of the WT/DROC resources.  However, the University will continue to review this situation for appropriateness and timing.  The University remains committed to the principles of reducing IT costs and leveraging state-wide economies of scale, while ensuring no disruption of service to its students, faculty, and staff
.

Table 3:  Agency Platforms Systems and TeleCommunications
 
 

Category
Type
Operating System
Database
Management
System
Capacity/ 
Size/
Count
Comments / Descriptive Information
Mainframe
AMDAHL
OS/390 v2.5
ADABAS
641 MIPS /109MSUs 
Central Application Server
Minicomputer
None
 
 
 
 
Network 
Provided by
ACITS 
See ACITS responses 
for details.
 
 
LAN Servers (Central) 
File Servers
MacOS8,
MacOS9
None; 
Apple File Sharing 
software
Departmental File Servers
LAN Servers 
(Remote) 
None
 
 
 
 
LAN Client /Workstations (Central)



 
 
 

MAC
 
 

PC



 
 
 

MacOS8,
MacOS9 
 

WIN95, 98,
NT, 2000



 
 
 
 

FileMakerPro for 
Departmental uses 
 

None



 
 
 
 

120 
 

20



 
 
 

 

ACS Workstation Counts only
 
 

ACS Workstation Counts only 

NOTE: Total of ~35000 IP addresses in campus network.  Admin-7000 (70%/30%); Faculty-3500 (40%/60%); Students-6000 (5%/95%); Labs-2000 (20%/80%); TeleSys-3500; DHCP Servers-2000; Departmental Servers-2000; Central Servers-500
 

LAN Client/ Workstations (Remote)
None
 
 
 
 
WAN Servers


 

Web 
 

FTP Encrypted TN3270

Data Warehouse PhotoID
Server 
Digital 
Certificate 
Imaging


HP-UX v10.20 
& v11 

HP-UX v10.20 
HP-UX v11 
& AIX 4.3 

HP-UX v10.20

NT4.0 SP5

HP-UX v10.20

NT4.0 SP4


ADABAS-D

None 
None 

ADABAS-D 

ADABAS-D

None

None

6

1
3

1

1

1

8

ACSWebserver Counts only

ACS FTP server Counts only
Provides secure SNA access

ACS Data Warehouse Counts only 

Database of ID card photos 

ACITS digital certificate server 

Campus-wide Document Imaging servers

Stand-Alone PC Workstations
None
 
 
 
 
Internet Service Provider
 
  ACITS
 
  N/A 
Academic Computing (ACITS) at UT-Austin is the ISP for UT-Austin
Shared Network
 
  Own 
 
N/A
See ACITS responses for details.

Table 4: Agency Databases
 

Database Name 
Database Description 
Database System 
Estimated 
Physical 
Storage 
Requirements
GIS Data Classification
Sharing 
Future
General Information… 
The centralized production databases on the Administrative Computer System contains about 800 physical files on 6 copies of ADABAS.  Complexes of these files support all applications– some public, some private.  All files are owned by the departments that owns the applications.  For example, the major application *DEFINE files are owned by the Office of Accounting while student records files are owned by the Registrar.  Over 1800 applications use these files on ADABAS and access/update is controlled by the file owners.  Certain database files are designated as ‘critical’ according to definitions established by DIR and State and Federal requirements.  The database areas designated as ‘critical’ are profiled below. 
ADABAS 
 
243-GB (Total) 
 

None
 
 

Several UT component institutions use the ACS Computer Systems of UT-Austin to run their business applications.
Next Biennium will see ACS adopt an XML-based DBMS.  Initial investigations are currently underway.
Student Records
The critical application known as ‘student records’ consists of the official, online collection of data used to support admission, registration, transcripts certification and related functions.  It includes over 30 database files, hundreds of batch systems, and thousands of online screens and web pages.
ADABAS 
20 GB 
None 
UT-Austin developed and operates an Internet EDI server which allows all colleges/universities in the U.S.  to exchange transcripts and other educational documents electronically.  UT-Austin developed and maintains the State of Texas “Common Admissions Application” website.  Numerous other examples also apply.
No major database revision is currently planned.
Human Resources
The Human Resources shares critical databases with Budget/Payroll for a significant portion of employee position information, equal employment reporting, insurance elections, state service and directory information.  In addition there are separate HR databases to store and maintain critical information for our application for employment, job postings, leave management, imaging, and employee statistics.
ADABAS
4 GB 
None 
Seven (7) UT component institutions use the HR portion of the UT-Austin financial systems and their data is kept on this database.
No major database revision is currently planned.
Payroll / Budget
The Budget / Payroll database stores data on employees, including payroll appointments, check deducts and entitlements data.  Also, budget accounts, line items and job code pay-plan records.
ADABAS 
10 GB 
None 
Ten (10) University of Texas component institutions currently share this application.
No major database revision is currently planned.
Accounting / Financials
The Accounting / Financials database stores accounting transactions, balances, property inventory, purchasing records, HUB purchases, vendor addresses, and other data to support fiscal operations.
ADABAS 
60 GB 
None
Seven (7) UT component institutions use these financial systems and their data is kept on this database. 
No major database revision is currently planned.
Financial Aid
The Financial Aid database stores financial aid and scholarship applications for students who have applied for assistance to UT Austin.  Application processing, document tracking and award information including scholarships, grants and loans is stored for students who have been admitted to UT Austin.  Disbursement information is also stored for students who enroll at UT Austin and receive funds via the Office of Student Financial Services.  Auxiliary notes may be stored for some applicants.  This database is comprised of 18 files.
ADABAS
6 GB 
None 
Only UT Austin data is maintained on this database.
No major database revision is currently planned.
Alumni / Development 
The Alumni / Development database stores biographical information regarding donors and prospective donors, financial giving histories, proposal tracking to relate research activities and research interests of potential donors, etc.
ADABAS 
8 GB 
None 
Certain functions and data elements are shared by UT Austin and UT System. The database and application are designed to enable sharing by UT Component institutions but none other than UT Austin and UT System currently participate.
No major database revision is currently planned.
Housing & Food 
The Housing & Food database stores and maintains information regarding 6000+ students housed in University-owned facilities.  This database provides online, web-based applications,  roommate profiling and selection, etc.  These systems are all on ADABAS.  On an Oracle database we hold a declining storage value system which supports our meal system.
ADABAS and ORACLE 
5 GB - ADABAS .5 GB -ORACLE 
None
Currently our systems are not shared with other Universities.
No major database revision is currently planned.

Table 5:  Agency Applications
 

Application Name
Application Type
Application Description
Database System 
Development Language 
Sharing
Future
General Information… 
 
Over 1,800 applications use the centralized database files that reside on the Administrative Computing enterprise servers.  Access/update of the files is controlled by the file owners.  Access/update capabilities within applications are controlled by the owners of the applications.  The major application areas designated as 'critical' based on their access/update to critical database files are listed below.
 ADABAS 
NATURAL
ACS strives to make all software sharable by all University of Texas component institutions.  That plan continues. There are no current plans to replace the NATURAL programming language.  However, object-oriented (OO) tools and languages will be added to our toolset in the coming biennium.
Student Records
Web enabled D/W Imaging
The critical application known as 'student records' consists of the official, online collection of data used to support admission, registration, transcripts certification and related functions.  It includes over 30 database files, hundreds of batch systems, and thousands of online screens and web pages.
ADABAS
NATURAL 
This application services only UT Austin students and applicants- except for the Texas Common Admissions Application service.  The Common App services is shared by every public higher education institution in Texas and every person in the United States who desires to attend oneof these Texas colleges and universities.
Continued expansion of features and flexibility of reporting.
Human Resources
Web enabled D/W Imaging
Provides employee/departmental self-service web and 3270 access to Human Resources functions including Employment, Compensation, Insurance andRetirement, Equal Employment Reporting, Records (e.g., State Service, Biographical, Directory, Imaging), and Leave Management.  Provides management information retrieval and reporting capabilities for seven (7) UT component institutions. 
ADABAS 
NATURAL 
Seven (7) UT component institutions use these HR systems and their data is kept on this database.
Continued expansion of features and flexibility of reporting.
Payroll / Budget 
Web enabled, D/W 
Computes Payroll checks and provides all subsequent reports and data to all governmental, legislative, and banking bodies.  Maintains and creates Budgetary needs for most of the University of Texas component institutions.  Provide Payroll Appointments document system in use for Departmental entry.
ADABAS
NATURAL
Ten (10) University of Texas component institutions currently share this application. 
Continued expansion of features and flexibility of reporting.
Accounting / Financials
Web enabled, D/W,
Imaging 
Real-time application providing electronic documents to perform fiscal procedures.  Provides management information retrieval and reporting capabilities for seven (7) UT component institutions.
ADABAS 
NATURAL 
Seven (7) UT component institutions use these financial systems and their data is kept on this database.
Continued expansion of features and flexibility of reporting.
Financial Aid
Web enabled, Imaging 
This application collects and processes financial aid and scholarship applications and various related documents, performs applicant verification, awards loans, scholarships, grants, and exemptions, provides correspondence to applicants and releases funds to students via UT Austin's central accounting system.  It also fulfills federal and state reporting requirements.  This application is comprised of real-time and batch systems as well as web access.  All financial aid applications are received electronically from the Department of Education.  Scholarship applications are received via paper and the web.  Over 95% of loan applications are transmitted electronically and funds received at UT via EFT.  Approximately 80% of student funds are released via direct deposit.  Two document imaging systems are also incorporated into this application.
ADABAS 
NATURAL 
This application services only UT Austin applicants. 
More data available on the web including sending and receiving documents, convert images from old imaging system to newer system, continue to increase use of email notifications.
Alumni / Development
Web enabled, D/W,
Imaging
Application to enable University fund-raising officers to increase giving to The University and to provide the necessary tools so that Ex-Students can track membership.
ADABAS
NATURAL 
Certain functions and data elements are shared by UT Austin and UT System.  The database and application are designed to enable sharing by UT Component institutions, but none other than UT Austin and UT System currently participate.
Continued expansion of features and flexibility of reporting.
Housing & Food 
Web enabled, D/W 
Housing and Food has a two pronged Web development course: one focusing on residents, potential residents and their parents (application process, information delivery, meal plan status, debit card development, roommate matching, study team building, paying on-line) and one focusing on staff (hall and apartment reservation system, conferencing system, residence life tools).  All systems are "real-time" and fully integrated with students’ records and centralized financial systems.  We also have door access, key, and work order systems with only a 3270 interface.
ADABAS and ORACLE
NATURAL 
Currently these systems are not shared with other Universities.
Continued expansion of features and flexibility of reporting, development of a Residential Judicial system, a Work Request & Order system on the Web, a virtual room tour and revision of the key software.

TABLE 6:  Interagency Data Needs
 

Data Needed
Obstacles
Needed Assistance
None
  General 
Administrative Computing continuesto face two general obstacles toward meeting its goals as described inthis report.  These two obstacles are systemic to the entire information technology industry: 1) adequate funding to keep pace with technological advances and 2) retention of skilled technical staff.
None
  Funding
The pace of technological change that happens in "Internet time" rapidly obviates hardware and software tools and solutions recently employed.  The pressure to remain technologically advanced is great but the costs are high.  Additional funding is required in order to assist the University in being the world-class institution that the State of Texas desires and deserves.
None 
Retention of 
Technical Staff
The retention of staff with adequate skills and training in technical areas is necessary to support the development and maintenance of the University's information technology infrastructure.  The specific staff positions in most critical supply remain programmers, systems analysts ,systems programmers, and networking technicians.  The staffing situation continues to be influenced by: 1) the discrepancy between the pay scales for these positions at the University compared to those offered in the private sector and 2) the increasing number of job opportunities in technical fields created by the rapid adoption of the Internet and the World Wide Web for electronic commerce and personal communications.  The average experience level for all technical staff in ACS including the most senior positions is about six years.  This average experience level is approximately half of what it was just 5 years ago.  This loss of experience and expertise translates into the difficulty to undertake and complete large-scale, complex projects.
None 
Data Sharing 
The University of Texas at Austin conducts substantial and ongoing data sharing with other institutions, agencies and businesses.  At this time the University is not confronted with any particular technical, legal, or administrative obstacles that significantly impede or restrict the institution’s access to needed information.


Updated June 1, 2000.

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Move forward to Appendix H.