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The Clarendons are a variation of the Antique style in which the serifs are bracketed—with a soft transition at the stroke joints—and tend to exhibit higher contrast between thick and thin strokes. The first bracketed Antique shown typographically was by the English foundry Blake & Stephenson, in 1833, and named Ionic. This name would be used for this bracketed style until 1845 when Robert Besley registered a heavier design with higher stroke contrast named Clarendon. The Clarendon style was immensely popular during the second half of the nineteenth century, and was quickly elaborated into a wide range of designs. One popular variation was the French Clarendon, which shared inverted stroke stress with French Antiques and Italians.

The first instance of Clarendon produced in wood type was Clarendon Condensed by Bill, Stark & Co., in 1853. Wells & Webb showed both Clarendon and Clarendon Condensed in their 1854 Specimens of Wood Type. William Page first showed a French Clarendon as wood type in James Conner’s Sons Typographic Messenger, in November, 1865. All manufacturers of wood type produced a range of Clarendons throughout the nineteenth century, with French Clarendon being the dominant style.



Ionic
Ionic
Ionic Condensed
Clarendon Light Face
Clarendon Light Face XX Condensed
Clarendon Extended
Clarendon Extended
Columbian
Columbian
Columbian
Aldine
Aldine
Aldine
Aldine Ornamented
Clarendon Italian
Clarendon No 1
Clarendon No 1
Clarendon No 1
French Clarendon
French Clarendon
French Clarendon
French Clarendon
French Clarendon Condensed
Aldine Expanded
Norwich Aldine
Egyptian
Egyptian Condensed
French Clarendon No 2
French Clarendon No 2
Belgian
Belgian
No 117
No 504
Streamer No 36
No 515
No 515
No 501
Celtic
Celtic Chromatic
Antique Clarendon