Center for Asian American Studies
Center for Asian American Studies

Alexander Cho


InstructorPh.D., Media Studies, University of Texas at Austin

Lecturer

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Interests


Social Media, Mobile Media, Affect, Cultural Anthropology, Youth Digital Media Cultures, Ethnography, Queer Studies, Queer of Color Critique, Critical Race Theory, Asian American Studies, Cultural Studies

Courses


AAS 301 • Intro To Asian Amer Studies

34945 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CBA 4.326
(also listed as AMS 315)

Flag: Cultural Diversity in the U.S.

This is an interdisciplinary course that introduces students to major issues in the historical and contemporary experiences of Asian Americans. Accordingly, it also trains students to critically unpack the idea of “Asian American” as containing an ever-shifting multiplicity of peoples and histories and places this category in conversation with issues of power, race, nation, and gender and sexuality. This course also spends substantial time on contemporary Asian American issues and recent histories of migration. Key topics to be explored are: (im)migration, citizenship, imperialism, panethnicity, racial formation, intersectionality, multiraciality, transnationalism, hybridity, mediated representation.

AAS 320 • Asian American Gender & Sexual

34960 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm SZB 330
(also listed as AMS 321, WGS 335)

Why are Asian female bodies hypersexualized while Asian men are portrayed as emasculated? What can tracing the long history of sexual management of Asians in America reveal in terms of who is included in the category “American”? This course trains students to critically unpack concomitant constructions of race, ethnicity, gender and sexuality that have informed the Asian American experience and connects these issues to broader themes of gender and sexual politics throughout American history. The course’s multidisciplinary approach spans the fields of literature, sociology, history, media studies, and anthropology.

AAS 310 • Mixed Race Identities

35255 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAR 302
(also listed as AMS 315)

Flags: Cultural Diversity in the U.S. and Writing

What is “race,” and what does it mean to be “mixed”? How is mass media responsible for channeling fears, desires, and anxieties about “mixed” bodies? Why are “mixed race” bodies suddenly desirable and chic? Can one exist in two or more categories at the same time? How do people think of “mixedness” in the U.S., and how is it different in the Caribbean, Mexico, and Brazil? Why do people care so much? Why do categories matter? Isn’t everyone “mixed” somehow? Where do you fit in?

This course will give students the tools to critically respond to these questions via a comparative, historically situated study of the representation of "mixed-race" people in the United States. Major attention will be paid to special concerns for Asian American populations; it includes substantial attention to African American and Latino populations. Chiefly U.S.-centered, but with a large transnational comparative component analyzing “mixed” racial formation in: North America, Latin America, Caribbean, Brazil.

AAS 301 • Intro To Asian Amer Studies

36240 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 201
(also listed as AMS 315)

Flag: Cultural Diversity in the U.S.

This is an interdisciplinary course that introduces students to major issues in the historical and contemporary experiences of Asian Americans. Accordingly, it also trains students to critically unpack the idea of “Asian American” as containing an ever-shifting multiplicity of peoples and histories and places this category in conversation with issues of power, race, nation, and gender and sexuality. This course also spends substantial time on contemporary Asian American issues and recent histories of migration. Key topics to be explored are: (im)migration, citizenship, imperialism, panethnicity, racial formation, intersectionality, multiraciality, transnationalism, hybridity, mediated representation.

AAS 310 • Mixed Race And The Media

36310 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAR 302
(also listed as AMS 315)

Flags: Cultural Divesity in the U.S. and Writing

What is “race,” and what does it mean to be “mixed”? How is mass media responsible for channeling fears, desires, and anxieties about “mixed” bodies? Why are “mixed race” bodies suddenly desirable and chic? Can one exist in two or more categories at the same time? How do people think of “mixedness” in the U.S., and how is it different in the Caribbean, Mexico, and Brazil? Why do people care so much? Why do categories matter? Isn’t everyone “mixed” somehow? Where do you fit in?

This course will give students the tools to critically respond to these questions via a comparative, historically situated study of the representation of "mixed-race" people in popular media. Major attention will be paid to special concerns for Asian American populations; it includes substantial attention to African American and Latino populations. Chiefly U.S.-centered, but with a large transnational comparative component analyzing “mixed” racial formation in: North America, Latin America, Caribbean, Brazil.

AAS 310 • Mixed Race And The Media

35830 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm PAR 306

What is “race,” and what does it mean to be “mixed”? How is mass media responsible for channeling fears, desires, and anxieties about “mixed” bodies? Why are “mixed race” bodies suddenly desirable and chic? Can one exist in two or more categories at the same time? How do people think of “mixedness” in the U.S., and how is it different in the Caribbean, Mexico, and Brazil? Why do people care so much? Why do categories matter? Isn’t everyone “mixed” somehow? Where do you fit in?

This course will give students the tools to critically respond to these questions via a comparative, historically situated study of the representation of "mixed-race" people in popular media. Major attention will be paid to special concerns for Asian American populations; it includes substantial attention to African American and Latino populations. Chiefly U.S.-centered, but with a large transnational comparative component analyzing “mixed” racial formation in: North America, Latin America, Caribbean, Brazil.

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