Department of Anthropology

ANT 301 • Physical Anthroplogy-Wb

30090 • Kappelman Jr, John W.
Meets
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 This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of physical anthropology.  Physical anthropology is the study of human beings in a biological context, and seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words, who are we? how are we unique? how, why, an when did we come to be the way we are?The study of physical anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of the evolutionary process, and trace a pathway of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.

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ANT 301 • Physical Anthropology

30095-30147 • Reed, Denné N.
Meets MW 300pm-400pm WEL 1.308
show description

 This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of physical anthropology.  Physical anthropology is the study of human beings in a biological context, and seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words, who are we? how are we unique? how, why, an when did we come to be the way we are?The study of physical anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of the evolutionary process, and trace a pathway of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.

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ANT 301 • Physical Anthropology-Honors

30150 • Kirk, Chris
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm SAC 5.172
show description

 This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of physical anthropology.  Physical anthropology is the study of human beings in a biological context, and seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words, who are we? how are we unique? how, why, an when did we come to be the way we are?The study of physical anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of the evolutionary process, and trace a pathway of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.

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ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

30155-30210 • Seriff, Suzanne
Meets MW 900am-1000am WCH 1.120
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This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

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ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

30215-30230 • Merabet, Sofian
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm UTC 4.122
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This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

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ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology-Honors

30233 • Hosemann, Aimee
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm SAC 4.118
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

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ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

30235-30270 • Franklin, Maria
Meets MW 1000am-1100am FAC 21
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An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

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ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

30275-30290 • Denbow, James R.
Meets MW 200pm-300pm CLA 0.112
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An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

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ANT 305 • Expressive Culture

30295 • Lewis, Elizabeth
Meets TTH 930am-1100am UTC 3.124
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The purpose of this course is to introduce the concept of culture as a crucial dimension of human life. Because we tend to think of thought and action as stemming from individual impulses, we find the notion of a shared, highly variable, but influential force in our lives hard to fathom.  Even if we speak of "society" as a familiar concept, we tend to make of it a uniform, oppressive force, some institution outside ourselves that we individually confront and oppose. Yet only if we can learn to recognize how deeply we share certain assumptions and inclinations with others--but only some others, and to varying degrees--can we appreciate the degree to which culture inheres within us and makes us who we are.

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ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

30300 • Webster, Anthony K.
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 0.112
(also listed as LIN 312C)
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The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

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ANT 310L • Aztecs And Spaniards

30315 • Rodriguez-Alegría, Enrique R.
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm UTC 3.122
(also listed as LAS 315)
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The Aztec and the Spanish empires have attracted the attention of scholars and the public for a long time with stories of gold, human sacrifice, warfare, and the meeting of two different civilizations. In this class we will study both empires, taking advantage of the varied lines of evidence available for their study, especially historical and archaeological evidence, as well as monuments and works of art. The focus of the class will be on how imperial expansion affected the daily life of people in the Aztec empire and after the Spanish conquest. In addition to studying the daily life of different people in these empires, we will examine some of the themes that have fascinated both scholars and the general public, including human sacrifice, conquest warfare, and religion. The goal of the class is to examine social and cultural heterogeneity in both of these empires, to familiarize students with the diverse lines of evidence we have to study these empires, and to understand processes of historical change among the Aztecs and the Spanish empire.

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ANT 320L • Language And Empire

30317 • Handman, Courtney
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm SAC 4.118
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This course will provide students with a focused analysis of an important but often underemphasized source of colonial power and transformation – the role of language and linguistic analysis. From early attempts at organizing what seemed a cacophony of unstructured sound to later attempts at creating ethno-linguistically unified nations during decolonization to post-colonial reconfigurations of global languages, the course will examine languages and language study as primary media of domination and resistance in colonial regimes. How was colonialism communicated? What novel languages or forms of speech did colonial encounters engender? Are global languages like English creating new linguistic empires today? Topics covered include the role of missionary and colonial linguistics in the creation of order; the production of ethno-linguistic identities; pidgin, creole, and other hybrid formations; languages of resistance; and the place of global languages in the contemporary world.

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ANT 320L • German Lang: Hist Perspec

30320 • Pierce, Marc
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 337
(also listed as C C 348, GER 369, LIN 373)
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Description:

This class provides an overview of language, language evolution, and sociolinguistics, within the particular context of the history of German. The goal is to enlarge participants’ understanding and appreciation of German, its historical and dialectal development, and the rich ways speakers of German express meaning.  The course will begin with a discussion of German’s Indo-European origins, and progress from there through Germanic, West Germanic, Old, Middle, and Early New High German to the modern language.  The class will also examine examples from a broad range of Germanic languages, social and regional dialects, and pidgins and creoles, with an eye to developing a better understanding of the characteristics, origins and development of language and communication systems.  Other topics discussed in class will include the social roles of dialect as a divider and a unifier, Gastarbeiterdeutsch, the effects of TV and other forms of mass media on language, language acquisition, and language contact.

No prior training in linguistics is required. 

The course will be conducted in English.

 

Required texts:

A course packet will be made available, containing excerpts from the following sources (among others): Fortson, Indo-European Language and Culture: An Introduction, Robinson, Old English and its Closest Relatives, the OSU Language Files, Stevenson, The German-Speaking World, and Clyne, The German Language in a Changing Europe.

Homework and assignments:

Essays, written exercises, participation, term paper

 

Grading scheme:

Essays: 25%

Written exercises: 25%

Final paper: 25%

Participation: 25%


ANT 322M • Mexican Immigratn Cul Hist

30325 • Menchaca, Martha
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CLA 0.112
(also listed as LAS 324L, MAS 374)
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This course seeks to develop a student's understanding of the history of Mexican immigration to the U.S. It will provide an overview of migratory patterns dating back to the late pre-historic period through contemporary times. The focus of the course, however, will be current immigration issues dealing with: 1) causes of Mexican immigration: globalization, Mexican politics, agribusiness, 2) U.S. Law 3) incorporation, and 4) citizenship.

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ANT 324L • Anthropology Of The Himalayas

30330 • Hindman, Heather
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 0.118
(also listed as AAS 330, ANS 361)
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This course looks at the history and culture of the Himalayan region, including Northeast India, (briefly) sections of Pakistan and Afghanistan, Tibet but especially Nepal. Some understanding of Asian history, politics and religion will be helpful (but not necessary) as our attempt will not be a comprehensive survey of the region. The Himalayas have been the site of a great deal of anthropological attention and as such we will be simultaneously be exploring several key theoretical, historical and methodological issues within the discipline of anthropology as we learn about places and people in the region. Particular attention will be paid to the area as a site for negotiating identity (caste and indigeneity), development politics, the environment, tourism, diasporas as well as the current political tensions in the region. At the conclusion of the class, students should have a stronger idea of the important role this area has played in the political, religious and social imagination of the world and an appreciation of concepts such as ritual theory, social movements, modernity and gender studies


ANT 324L • Art & Archaeol Of Anc Peru

30333 • Runggaldier, Astrid
Meets MWF 900am-1000am DFA 2.204
(also listed as LAS 327)
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The growth of civilization in South America from the earliest decorated textiles, pottery, and ceremonial buildings to the imperial Inca style.


ANT 324L • Big Asian Histories

30335 • Oppenheim, Robert M
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 0.120
(also listed as ANS 361, HIS 364G)
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What makes histories “big”?  The focus of this course is on world histories centrally involving Asia from the medieval period to the present.  It examines ways in which Asia and other areas of the globe have had connected intellectual, artistic, and social developments, and how Asia figured in the “rise of the West” to industrial and imperial dominance by the end of the nineteenth century.  It looks also at global histories of political forms and actions, social spaces and dynamics, and scientific theories and practices that have been exemplified through Asia—of, for instance, the interaction of nomadic and sedentary modes of life, domestic spaces, and “growth” as a ruling idea of economic planning.  Throughout the course, historiographical issues are paramount: How does one conceive of and write “connected histories”?


ANT 324L • Black Women/Transnatl State

30345 • Smith, Christen
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm SAC 5.102
(also listed as AFR 372F, LAS 324L, WGS 340)
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This course surveys black women’s experiences living with and confronting state oppression around the world. From the United States to Brazil, black women experience similar patterns of political, social and economic inequality. Transnationally, racism, sexism, patriarchy, homophobia, and classism affect the quality of life of black women, particularly within nation-states with legacies of slavery and colonialism. This course takes an historical, social and theoretical look at the roots of this inequality and how black women have chosen to respond to it locally and globally. How have interlocking forms of oppression affected black women’s citizenship within the modern nation-state? How have black women, in turn, sought to organize themselves in response to this oppression?

Objectives

1) To think critically about the multiple forms of oppression that affect black women’s lives globally;

2) To consider how black women’s political identity has been defined by experiences with oppression transnationally;

3) To define and articulate black women’s agency in response to oppression

Key Topics: Racism, sexism, patriarchy, homophobia, classism, transnationalism, representation, agency, black feminism.


ANT 324L • Contemp African Pop Culture

30351 • Livermon, Xavier
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm BIO 301
(also listed as AFR 372G, WGS 340)
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Description:

The aim of the course is to introduce students to some of the most significant aspects of popular culture in contemporary sub-Saharan Africa, Manifestations of popular culture are considered as markers of modern African identities, embedded in complex and varied socio-cultural, historical and political contexts. Within the current era of global, diasporic, and transnational flows, it is neither sufficient any longer to view Africa solely from the perspective of political economies, not to discuss contemporary African culture within the tradition-versus-modernity debate. Manifestations of popular culture in Africa show that the continent is part and parcel of the postmodern world, with cultural production simultaneously influenced by global trends and specific African contexts.

The course will cover various forms of cultural expression and genres, including popular film, music, literature, dance, comics and cartoons, fashion, sport, street art, theatre, and contemporary visual arts. Attention will be paid to the production modes, audiences and sites of consumption of these different genres and aspects of popular culture. Course instruction will include extensive film and clip viewings, analysis of music, and reading fictional texts such as popular novels and comics.

 

Texts:

Marguerite Abouet Aya: Life in Yop City.

Nadine Dolby: Constructing Race: Youth, Identity and Popular Culture in South Africa.

Manthia Diawara: In Search of Africa.

Sokari Ekine: ed. SMS Uprising: Mobile Activism in Africa.

Relebohile Molestane, Claudia Mitchell, and Ann Smith eds: Was it Something I Wore? Dress, Identity, Materiality

Mwenda Ntarangwi: East African Hip-Hop: Youth Culture and Globalization

Simone Weller and Garth Walker: South African Township Barbershops and Salons.

 

Grading:

Attendance and Participation 20%

Response Papers 20%

Midterm 20%

Final 40% 


ANT 324L • Creation And Evolution

30355 • Friesen, Steven J.
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CBA 4.324
(also listed as R S 346)
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Starting with the late 17th century inquiries of Nicholas Steno, debate and discussion on the question of evolution raged in biology until the neo-Darwinian synthesis of the 1930’s established evolution by mutation, genetic drift, and natural selection as the consensus paradigm of modern biology and the organizing principle around which the discipline is based. The universal adherence to evolutionary principles in biology stands in stark contrast to popular perceptions, where about half of the U.S. population reject the basic tenants of evolution, often on religious grounds.

In this course students learn the history of creationist and evolutionary thought and through this lens explore the different epistemological traditions used in religion, science, and the humanities. The aim of this course is to promote fundamental scientific and religious literacy, critical thinking and civil discourse in a class that is team-taught by a physical anthropologist and a specialist in Biblical literature. The course takes a broad look at how different religious traditions approach the question of origins, and how they interact with one another and with science. Course materials -- including written essays, video interviews and debates -- serve as the fulcrum for in-depth classroom discussions in which students must articulate their ideas about challenging topics in a compelling, comprehensive and compassionate manner.

Through critical reading, civil discourse, and concise writing, students explore the scientific basis of evolution; different definitions of science, religion and mythology; the debate on intelligent design; scientific and mythic cosmologies; the bases of epistemologies; the role of science and religion in morality and ethics; and contemporary politics surrounding science education.

 

Texts

Dixon, Thomas. 2008. Science and Religion: A Very Short Introduction. New York: Oxford University Press.Wood, Bernard. 2005. Human Evolution: A Very Short Introduction. New York: Oxford University Press.Dennett, Daniel C. and Alvin Plantinga. 2011. Science and Religion: Are They Compatible? New York, Oxford University Press.

 

Grading

1. Attendance 7%2. Participation 8%3. Journal 30%4. Midterm 25%5. Final Exam 30%


ANT 324L • Goddesses World Relig/Cul

30357 • Selby, Martha
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BUR 216
(also listed as ANS 340, R S 373, WGS 340)
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This course will provide a historical and cross-cultural overview of the relationship between feminine and religious cultural expressions through comparative examinations and analyses of various goddess figures in world religions.  We will begin our study in Asia; specifically in India, where goddess worship is a vital part of contemporary Hinduism in all parts of the subcontinent.  From the goddesses of the Hindu tradition (Kālī and Lakṣmī, for example), we will move on to female figures in the Buddhist Mahāyāna pantheon (such as Kuan-Yin, popular in China, Korea, and Japan), and then on to some of the goddesses of western antiquity (Inanna, Isis, Athena, Aphrodite, and Mary in her aspects as mother and intercessor).  We will end the course with a study of contemporary goddess worship in the United States as an important expression of Neo-Paganism.  Issues relating to gender, sexuality, power, and violence (domestic and political) will be emphasized as themes throughout the course.


ANT 324L • Inca World

30360 • Covey, R. Alan
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SAC 4.118
(also listed as LAS 324L)
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When Francisco Pizarro and led an expeditionary force into the Andean highlands in 1532, the Incas ruled the largest native empire to develop anywhere in the Americas.  The Incas governed millions of subjects living across one of the most diverse regions of the planet, and they left behind impressive material remains that speak to their organizational and technological abilities.  This course will explore how Inca civilization developed, how the Incas grew from a small highland state into a mighty empire, and how a small number of Spaniards and their allies were able to bring the Inca dynasty to an end.  We will read accounts of the Incas written in the first years of Spanish colonial rule, and will also review the latest archaeological discoveries.

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ANT 324L • Political Ecology

30365 • Cons, Jason
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 0.124
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 Over the past three decades, Political Ecology has emerged as a powerful interdisciplinary critique of ecological change. Simply put, Political Ecology is a strategy for mapping political, economic, and social factors onto questions of environmental degredation and change. Political Ecology has been a powerful strategy for reinserting politics into apolitical discussions of ecology and the environment; writing disposed groups—human and non-human—back into discussions about conservation; and unsettling common sense understandings of “the environment” as separate from “the social.” This course will provide an introduction to core tenets of political ecology. Particularly focusing on ethnographic approaches, this course will introduce students to key debates in the field—such as the relationship between environment and violence, the critique of Malthusian and neo-Malthusian notions of scarcity and limits, the links between conservation and dispossession, and more. It will further explore the uses of political ecology in key contemporary debates over social and environmental change—from climate change to waste management. 

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ANT 324L • Religions Of The Caribbean

30370 • Crosson, J. Brent
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm SZB 296
(also listed as AFR 372G, LAS 324L, R S 366)
show description

In this course we will discuss the politics of religious practices in the Greater Caribbean, from Vodou and Rastafari to popular Hinduism. As a region, the Greater Caribbean encompasses the islands of the insular Caribbean, the Caribbean coasts of Central America and South America, Brazil, and the centers of Caribbean trans-migration in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries (this course will focus on Caribbean diasporas in New York City, for example). While the Caribbean is usually seen as African diasporic and Christian, West and Central African religions, Hinduism, Islam, spiritism, European esotericism, and indigenous religions all maintain long-standing and vibrant presences. We immerse ourselves in the complex nexus of Caribbean religions through explorations of practices including Cuban-Kongo religion, Haitian vodou, U.S. fantasies of voodoo and U.S. interventions in the Caribbean, Hindu popular religions in Trinidad and Guyana, Islam in the Caribbean, Black Carib religion in New York and Honduras, and Rastafarianism in Jamaica.

 

Texts

1. Barry Chevannes. Rastafari: Roots and Ideology2. William Earle and Srinivas Aravamudan. Obi; or the History of Three-Fingered Jack3. Karen McCarthy Brown. Mama Lola: A Vodou Priestess in Brooklyn4. Paul Christopher Johnson. Diaspora Conversions: Black Carib Religion and theRecovery of Africa5. Aisha Khan, ed. Islam and the Americas6. Todd Ramón Ochoa. Society of the Dead: Quita Manaquita and Palo Praise in Cuba

 

Grading

Class Attendance and Participation (15%)

Two Midterms  (25% each)

Final Exam (35%)


ANT 324L • Sport, Religion, & Society

30375 • Traphagan, John W.
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GEA 114
(also listed as R S 373)
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Sport has become a major feature of life in industrial and post-industrial worlds, as well as in many parts of the developing world. People attend games, follow their teams in newspapers and on television, pray for teams and players to succeed, bet on their teams in office pools or through betting agencies, and talk about sports constantly.  In this course we will consider sport in relation to a variety of questions that contextualize sport as it relates to ritual and religious practice.  We will consider questions such as: What constitutes a sport?  What is the relationship between sport and religion?  How are sport-related institutions different from or similar to religious institutions?  The course considers these questions and explores the meaning and nature of sport in cross-cultural perspective.

 

Texts

Bissinger, Friday Night Lights: A Town, A Team, and A Dream

Foer, How Soccer Explains the World

Price, Rounding the Bases: Baseball and Religion in America

Baker, Playing with God: Religion and Modern Sport

 

Grading   

Wikipedia Project (40%) 

Mid-Term Exam (20%)

Final Exam (20%)


ANT 324L • Who Owns The Past

30385 • Covey, R. Alan
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm SAC 4.174
show description

 The roots of scientific archaeology lie in antiquarianism and colonial empire.  Elite collectors assembled ancient artifacts, for aesthetic reasons or to assert links with the past, and museums developed to fulfill such functions in the public interest in emerging nation-states.  This course will discuss the complex and often contentious ways that these legacies influence contemporary archaeology, museum practices, and international heritage management.  The central question—who owns the past?—will be explored in both an intellectual sense and an economic one.  We will discuss cooperation and conflict among archaeologists and descendant communities, issues of repatriation, and laws and policies that determine the treatment of artifacts as commodities.

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ANT 324L • Nature, Society, & Adaptatn

30395 • Knapp, Gregory W.
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CLA 2.606
(also listed as GRG 331K)
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This course examines the long-term human trajectory in gaining control over resources, impacting the environment, and transforming planet earth into a meaningful human home. This trajectory has been related to long-term changes in human integration (reciprocity, trade, and redistribution) at a variety of scales, culminating in recent globalization. These changes have been associated with great achievements in quality of life for some, but with attendant problems of violence, impoverishment, and environmental impacts including, in some extreme cases, collapse. These challenges implicate both culture (learned habitual behavior, concepts, and associated objects and landscapes) and ethics (socially oriented decisions) as they promote or fail to promote resilience and adaptation with respect for human rights.

 The course will discuss major transformations: the origins of the human species, the domestication of plants and animals, the rise of agricultural societies and urban civilizations, global mercantile colonialism, and modernization and urbanization. Attention will be paid to the theories and works of geographers, ecological anthropologists, environmental historians, and others. Lectures and student-proctored discussions examine selected strategies employed by humans to cope with the challenges and take advantage of the opportunities presented by different natural environments, with special attention to foraging, food, and farming. The course will also provide an introduction to ethical and policy issues surrounding sustainable development and alternative futures. Grading is based on attendance and participation, numerous writing assignments, oral presentations, and proctoring.

 

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ANT 324L • Archaeol Of African Thought

30405 • Denbow, James R.
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm SAC 4.174
(also listed as AFR 372G)
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This course uses archaeological, anthropological and historical works to examine the development and transformation of African societies from the Neolithic through the slave trade and the beginning of the colonial period. The course will discuss the historic and prehistoric foundations of contemporary African societies south of the Sahara, focusing especially on equatorial and southern Africa. The intention is to develop an understanding of the cultural dynamics of African societies and traditions, and their transformations through time. This provides an interpretive framework from which to examine emerging archaeological perspectives on the Atlantic slave trade and the cultural foundations of the Diaspora in the New World.

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ANT 324L • Polit Of Race/Violnc Brazil

30410 • Smith, Christen
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm WAG 201
(also listed as AFR 374E, LAS 324L)
show description

This course explores race/gender/sexuality, violence and everyday life in Brazil. Brazil’s history has been characterized by moments of violent encounter, from colonization, to slavery, to clashes between police and residents across its major cities today. These violent encounters have been, in many ways, racialized, gendered and sexualized. This class investigates the race/gender/sexuality aspects of multiple forms of violence in Brazil, and how this violence creates, defines and maintains social hierarchies in the nation.

Throughout the course we will think through the question “what is violence?” as we discuss the concept’s physical, structural and symbolic forms. The course pays particular attention to the politics of blackness and the unique relationship black Brazilians have to the nation-state. We will also discuss the politics of writing and theorizing violence when doing social analysis, and the precarious balance between defining and addressing issues of violence, and glorifying it.

Objectives: 1) To think critically about violence not only as a physical encounter, but a multilayered phenomenon that manifests itself in different ways; 2) To consider how race functions in Brazil and what violence has to do with it; 3) To better understand the politics of discussing and writing about race and violence particularly within the field of anthropology.

Key topics: Colonization, slavery, blackness, whiteness, racial democracy, urban conflict, police repression, death, gender, sexuality, urban cleansing/gentrification, land conflict, imprisonment, symbolic violence, structural violence, physical violence, genocide.


ANT 324L • Theories Of Archaeology

30415 • Rodriguez-Alegría, Enrique R.
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SAC 4.174
show description

This course is a senior seminar for students who are pursuing studies in archaeology, and satisfies the “theory” requirement for the Anthropology degree. It is a broad survey of the major theoretical trends that have shaped anthropological archaeology over time. As such it is a course on the history of archaeological thought that highlights the major debates and key issues that have influenced the ways in which we diversely claim to know what we know about the past.

Why a course on theories of archaeology? We tend to envision archaeology as the discovery of sites and the pursuit of artifacts since field excavations dominate its public persona in print, documentaries, and of course in Hollywood movies. Yet archaeologists actually spend more time dealing with the analyses of excavated materials and moving from data to interpretations or explanations of the past than we do digging. The various intellectual approaches that we take towards drawing conclusions, if even tentative ones, are influenced by the different perspectives we have of the relationship between the past and the present, what kinds of information or meaning we believe can be derived from the archaeological record, the questions we seek to answer, and indeed, how much of the past each of us posits is knowable. Thus, what we often refer to as “archaeological theory” is best stated in the plural since there are multiple and competing ways that archaeologists theorize archaeological remains in order to interpret past societies and lifeways. That is to say, there is not a single, proven “archaeological theory” widely accepted by all. Theories are intertwined with practice/methodologies and are what frames and drives our interpretations, or what serve as the basis for our generalizing explanations of the past. Rather than bemoan the discipline’s heterogeneity, it is hoped that students will come to appreciate its diversity and breadth.

While we will spend the majority of the semester with a focus on how archaeologists deal with the archaeological record and past cultures and societies as subjects of inquiry, we will also explore the politics of the discipline. That is, what role does archaeology play in the contemporary world with respect to urgent issues such as inequality and nationalism? Some of the topics that are now central in archaeology that will be addressed include professional ethics, social responsibility, working with the public, and Indigenous rights over their past.

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ANT 324L • Ethnogrphic Theory/Practice

30420 • Sturm, Circe
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 0.106
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This course explores the complex relationship between anthropological ideas and ethnographic practice. The goals of the course are two-fold: (1) to introduce a broad spectrum of concepts, issues, and theories of culture, and (2) to critically examine how these theories and ideas shape anthropological methods and writings. To do this, we will read and critique five ethnographies on five different cultures, each with vastly different approaches to their respective subjects. In teaching, I use a combination of lecture and discussion, interspersed with various classroom exercises, films and creative writing assignments. We begin the semester by asking, “what is ethnography?” and “what is theory?” Eventually we address more complicated issues such as how the construction of an ethnographic subject is shaped by pre-existing or dominant ideas about culture and how scholarly, political and personal agendas shape research projects, fieldwork strategies and ethnographic texts. We conclude the course by assessing where the study of culture is today, and by writing our own brief, creative ethnographies.

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ANT 324L • Global Indigenous Issues

30423 • Canova, Paola
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm JES A203A
(also listed as LAS 324L)
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This course examines contemporary issues facing indigenous peoples around the world. It takes an historical and ethnographic approach to critically analyzing the ways in which indigenous peoples have been impacted and continue to respond to forces such as colonialism and capitalism in different regions of the world. Topics include: Self Determination the Nation State, Human Rights, Gender, Ecologies, Migration and Social Movements.

 

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ANT 324L • Archaeology Of Climate Change

30425 • Rosen, Arlene
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 1
(also listed as GRG 356)
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Course Description: Climate change has impacted human societies over the course of human existence on the planet. It has played a role in everything from hominin evolution to the rise and fall of civilizations through to the present day economic and ethical decision-making. In this course we will examine why climate changes, the methods for recording climate change, and discuss case studies of the varied responses of past human societies to climate change in different geographic regions and time periods with varying socio-political and economic systems. We will explore aspects of resilience and rigidity of societies and issues of environmental sustainability in the past as well as the present. Finally we will compare and contrast modern responses to climate change on a global scale with those of past societies.

Goals: To familiarize students with the evidence for climate change and methods of climate change research; to increase their understanding of the social, economic and technological issues human societies faced in the past when dealing with climate change. To understand what were adaptive and maladaptive human strategies. To help students evaluate the modern politics and social responses to climate change. On successful completion of this course a student should understand how climate change is recorded and the basic climatic record for the period of human occupation of the earth. To be familiar with current debates about how human societies adapt to climate change. To be able to think critically about issues and arguments proposed in the literature, and to write a coherent essay arguing a point of view.

Flags:

Ethics and Leadership

This course carries the Ethics and Leadership flag. Ethics and Leadership courses are designed to equip you with skills that are necessary for making ethical decisions in your adult and professional life. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments involving ethical issues and the process of applying ethical reasoning to real-life situations. Global Cultures This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

Requirements: The class will have regular lectures and class discussions; student participation is required. Students are expected to regularly attend all classes, complete the assigned readings in advance of class, and come ready to discuss readings or topics.

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ANT 324L • Digital Dat Sys In Archaeol

30430 • Jarvis, Jonathan H
Meets W 300pm-600pm T5D 1.102
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This course provides the basic knowledge and skills needed to operate digital equipment (e.g., GPS and Total Data Stations) commonly used for collecting location data on archaeological sites. Classroom instruction on mapping and grid systems will be translated into "hands-on" instrument operation in simulated archaeological field conditions. An introduction to GIS software and its applications in archaeology will be provided. Data collected during simulated field operations will be processed and mapped using GIS software. An overview of near-surface sensing techniques, including a field demonstration with a magnetometer, will be included.


ANT 324L • Food And Culture

30434 • Hosemann, Aimee
Meets MWF 900am-1000am SAC 4.174
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In the era of competing Paleo and Whole-Foods Plant-based diets and a burgeoning class of celebrity chefs, anthropologists have been asking: when we eat, what else are we consuming? This course examines cultural and linguistic anthropological views on the ways we eat, and how we talk about out what we eat, in the contemporary era. We consider not just what's on the plate or in the smoothie, but also how food - and the effect of food on the body - influences eaters' expressions of personal identity and their relations with other people. We will combine scholarly literature with videos and readings about food topics that circulate in popular culture, considering how flows of dietary images and discourses shape race/ethnicity, gender, social class, and other identifications.

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ANT 324L • Bronze/Iron Age Atlntc Eur

30435 • Wade, Mariah D.
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm SAC 4.174
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Course Description: This course surveys European prehistory and early history emphasizing the archeological connections between all geographic and cultural regions of Europe. The course focuses on the archaeological cultures of the 1) Eastern, Central and Western Mediterranean and 2) on those of Atlantic Europe.

Course objectives/expectations: Students will have a comprehensive regional understanding of European prehistoric and early historic cultural and

archeological similarities and differences.

Students will demonstrate their understanding through: 1) geographic knowledge, 2) human/landscape adaptations for specific cultural and archaeological periods, and 3) trade relationships between the different regions.

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ANT 325L • Europe Via Ethnography

30440 • Hartigan, John
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SAC 5.118
(also listed as EUS 346)
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Overview: This course takes a two-pronged approach, introducing students to the cultural complexity of Europe via an understanding of a premier method for generating social science knowledge—ethnography. We begin by developing a geographical and historical orientation to Europe: how has this landmass been peopled and occupied; what are its boundaries, conceptually and politically; what are the historical processes that produced its current configurations? This initial stage of the course will also introduce students to the core components of cultural analysis, developing a set of key terms that will be deployed throughout the semester to objectify social dynamics across Europe today. A basic objective is for the students to comprehend the different scales at which identity is constituted—locally, regionally, nationally, transnationally—and then distinctly inflected by the social diacritics of race, class, and gender. The remainder of the course will survey a broad range of topics—religion, migration, environmentalism, etc.—that are in the news today, principally drawing from recent ethnographic research. Students will learn how to read ethnographic and anthropological research, and then, in their final projects, formulate either 1) a prospective ethnographic research project or 2) a policy statement based principally on qualitative research.

Topics Covered: We will begin with processes and conflicts over migration. The aim is to expand their focus from issues over who travels, who is welcomed or denied entry, to focus on broad questions of belonging and difference, inclusion and exclusion, seen through historical and contemporary frames. This leads into discussions of the State, particularly concerning unsettled matters of ethnicity, but then also to the subject of European integration: how it fares in certain institutional contexts (sciences, banking, etc) and where it breaks down along national or perhaps ethnic lines. We will turn next to discussion of religion and secularism, examining the alternating implicit and explicit contests over belonging that play out in debates over citizenship. Then we address the politics of environmentalism, specifically as it presents “biomes” or “ecozones” as a form of common interests and action that crosscut national boundaries in ways both similar and distinct from religion.  From these fairly abstract registers, our focus will shift to topics such as sports, food, and music, taking up a range of more quotidian activities and concerns, where many of these larger topics are realized in everyday life.

Class dynamics: Lectures will systematically characterize the role of fundamental cultural dynamics informing a range of current debates in Europe today. In introducing “European ethnography,” I will convey to students how the range of topics and concerns on the continent relate to broader strands of anthropological analysis and cultural inquiry. Similarly, I will take opportunities to address parallels between the U.S. and Europe on subjects like immigration or religion, in order to understand the distinctiveness of these dynamics in Europe. “Whiteness” will be one of those overarching subjects that will allow us to think through commonalities and disjunctures in how racial identities operate. Assignments will require two types of writing: 1) short-format pieces, such as policy memos summarizing multiple ethnographic sources, and book reviews that analyze ethnographies as a whole; 2) a length final project, formulating either a proposal to pursue a hypothetical ethnographic project or a policy paper on current conflicts in Europe drawn principally from ethnographic materials.

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ANT 325L • Cultrl Heritage On Display

30445 • Seriff, Suzanne
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am SAC 4.118
(also listed as AMS 321)
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This course is designed to take you behind the scenes in the public construction, negotiation, and display of “American culture” by focusing on a number of cultural heritage sites in the public sphere. In particular, the course will examine fairs, festivals, theme parks, history sites, and museum exhibitions as contested sites of heritage production in American history—focusing especially on those moments when defining and displaying an image of the “true American” becomes an active agent in the process of nation building and ideological construction. We will focus closely on the histories and agencies of specific “exhibitionary complexes,” paying close attention to what one critic calls ‘the problematic relationship of their objects to the instruments of their display.” (Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett). Each student will have the opportunity to participate directly in creating and/or critiquing a cultural heritage site (including its methods of production, documentation, and display). Students will have an opportunity to conduct original field research, plan, design and critique a mock exhibit, heritage site or theme park, and critically analyze an historic example of cultural heritage production.


ANT 325L • Ethnographies Of Emotion

30450 • Stewart, Kathleen C.
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm SAC 4.118
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This course will be a writing flag. It will be run as a writing workshop with weekly writing assignments on topics including place, character, objects, subjects, cultural forms, everyday life and feeling states or structures such as trauma, love, hope, depression, the even keel and melodrama. We will explore how to articulate structures of feeling with models of culture and the self. We will carefully examine and experiment with modes of ethnographic attention, the importance of the telling detail and methods of participant observation.

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ANT 326L • Cultures In Contact

30455 • Wilson, Samuel M.
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm ART 1.102
(also listed as LAS 324L)
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History of the interactions of the indigenous peoples of the Americas with Africans, Asians, and Europeans over the past five hundred years.


ANT 432L • Primate Anatomy

30460 • Shapiro, Liza J.
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm SAC 5.172
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An exploration of the relationship between primate anatomical form and function, with emphasis on adaptations to diet and locomotion.  The course is also designed to demonstrate how such information can be applied to the fossil record in order to reconstruct the evolutionary development of primate adaptations.

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ANT 347C • Methods In Primate Biology

30465 • Hopkins, Mariah E.
Meets W 100pm-200pm SAC 5.124
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This course focuses on the study of primate behavior and the methods by which animal behavior is observed and documented.  Students will learn how to conduct library research, formulate hypotheses and predictions, devise research projects to test these predictions, collect and analyze data, and write comprehensive research reports describing these results.

1 lecture hour and 3 lab hours per week.

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ANT 348 • Human Origins And Evolution

30470-30485 • Kappelman Jr, John W.
Meets MW 1000am-1100am SAC 5.172
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This course examines the evidence for the origin and evolution of humans with particular emphasis placed on reconstructing the paleobiology of extinct hominins.  Lectures will draw upon a diverse range of disciplines (anatomy, archaeology, ecology, ethology, genetics, geology, paleontology) and integrate these into a framework for understanding the origin and evolutionary history of this unusual group of primates.  Weekly laboratories provide the student with an opportunity to examine firsthand the fossil evidence for human evolution.

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ANT 348K • Primate Conservation

30490 • Hopkins, Mariah E.
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SAC 4.118
(also listed as GRG 356T)
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Course Description: This course surveys the theory and practices of conservation biology, as applied specifically to primates. Topics will include species and community characteristics influencing extinction risk, current threats to primates, and potential conservation strategies.

Prerequisites: This is an upper division course. Prior background in physical anthropology or ecology is recommended, but not required. Ability to perform basic algebra is necessary.

Required Text:

Cowlishaw, G. & R. Dunbar. 2000. Primate Conservation Biology. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Recommended Text:

Clayton, S. & Myers, G. 2009. Conservation Psychology: Understanding and Promoting Human Care for Nature. Wiley Blackwell.

Additional Readings: Provided via canvas (check regularly!) and in-class.

Computer Programs (Freeware) Used: Vortex 9 Population Viability Analysis Software (B. Lacey, Chicago Zoological Society) and Landscape Species Selection II (Wildlife Conservation Society). Both computer programs require a PC, or a Mac that runs Windows.

Course Objectives:

1. To understand how the characteristics of primate species (i.e. behavior, ecology, demographics, physiology, and biogeography) influence extinction risk.

2. To become familiar with the major threats to primates, as well as the organizations working to conserve them.

3. To garner the tools necessary to evaluate feasible conservation plans, incorporating information from past conservation successes and failures.

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ANT 348K • Sex And Human Nature

30495 • Di Fiore, Anthony
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SAC 4.174
(also listed as WGS 323)
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I. Course Description and Rationale

This class provides an introduction to the SCIENTIFIC study of sexual behavior, mate choice, and reproduction in humans from the perspectives of evolutionary and comparative biology. In this course, we will examine a wide range of genetic, ecological, social, physiological, and behavioral aspects of human and nonhuman primate sexuality. Starting from basic principles of evolutionary theory, we consider a diverse range of basic questions about sex and sexuality: How is sex determined? Why did sexual reproduction evolve? How are males and females different biologically? What determines sexual orientation? We also look at the role of ecology and social life in shaping human mating patterns using a variety of ethnographic and cross- cultural materials. Do men and women differ in their sexual strategies and, if so, how and why? Why do people marry and form long-term pair-bonds? Why do we experience sexual jealousy? Finally, topics relevant to contemporary human sexuality will be also discussed, including rape, contraception, and the influence of sexually transmitted diseases on human evolution. Throughout, examples will be drawn primarily from traditional and modern human societies as well as from studies of our nonhuman primate relatives.

This course fits into the Department’s broader curriculum in biological anthropology by considering human sexual behavior in the context of comparative primate sexuality and reproduction and in demonstrating how evolutionary approaches can be used to make sense of the sexual behavior, mating patterns, and reproductive biology of the human species. It fits into the general anthropology curriculum in addressing important issues about human gender and sexuality from a combined biological and cultural perspective.

II. Course Aims and Objectives

Aims

The purpose of this course it to give students a solid foundation in evolutionary biology and adaptationist thinking as it is used in the anthropological sciences, with a specific focus on understanding aspects of human sexual anatomy, reproductive biology, sexual behavior, and cultural practices.

Specific Learning Objectives

When you have completed the course, you should be able to:

  • Summarize different adaptationist/evolutionary approaches to thinking about human

    behavioral biology (e.g., evolutionary psychology, human behavioral ecology) and

    distinguish among such approaches

  • Describe the fundamentals of human and mammalian sex determination systems,

    including the physiological and genetic underpinnings of sexual differentiation

  • Describe the physiological and endocrine processes involved in female reproductive

    cycling and in male spermatogenesis and how these change over the lifespan

  • Describe and contrast different hypotheses for the evolution of sexual reproduction

  • Discuss how human sexual anatomy, behavior, and mating practices are similar to and

    differ from those of other primates and other mammals

  • Understand the comparative method and how it can applied to answer evolutionary

questions

–2–

  • Articulate evolutionary hypothesis for a given pattern of human sexual behavior (e.g., mate choice) and design and critique tests of that hypotheses using logic and evidence

  • Read and critique research from the primary literature on human sexuality, including evaluating the strengths and weaknesses in the researchers methodology and interpretation

    III. Format and Procedures

    The course will be divided into four sections, each of which will involve a combination of lecture material and discussion/recitation during normal class time, both in small groups and as a class as a whole. In addition, students are expect to participate in and online collaborative project (the Sex and Human Nature weblog, see below). The following is an overview of the major topics we will cover in each part of the course:

    Part I – Principles of Evolutionary Biology

• Approaches to the scientific study of human sexuality and sexual behavior. Levels of explanation in evolutionary biology. Fundamentals of evolutionary theory. The evolution of sexual reproduction.

Part II – Natural History of Sex: A Comparative Perspective

• Sex determination processes in animals. The role of sex hormones in sexual differentiation. Male and female reproductive anatomy and physiology. The physiology of sexual intercourse. Orgasm and its significance. Human sexuality in comparative perspective.

Part III – The Mating Game: Strategies of Human Mate Choice and Retention

  • Sexual selection theory: Evolution and biological basis of sex differences in mating strategies, mate choice and attraction.

  • Intrasexual competition, woman’s “extended” sexuality, and sperm competition. Human marriage and mating systems in cross-cultural perspective. Mate guarding, mate retention, and the role of sexual jealousy. Biocultural perspective on control of sexuality

  • Sexual orientation: Biological bases and cross-cultural overview.

    Part IV – Sex in Our Lives

• Changes across the lifespan in human sexuality. Contraception and sexually transmitted disease and their evolutionary consequences. Sexual coercion: Unwanted attention, harassment, and rape. The future of human reproduction.

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ANT 349C • Human Variation

30500-30501 • Bolnick, Deborah A.
Meets MW 100pm-200pm SAC 4.174
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This course surveys the patterns of biological variation within and between human populations.  We will examine physical, genetic, and behavioral traits, and consider both the microevolutionary and cultural processes that influence those traits.  We will also discuss how studies of human variation have impacted society in the past and present.  Topics include:  an overview of the principles of genetics and evolution, race, sex differences, human variability in behavior, eugenics and contemporary genetic issues, human plasticity, and disease.

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ANT 366 • Anat And Bio Of Human Skeleton

30515 • Kirk, Chris
Meets TTH 1000am-1230pm SAC 5.172
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This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.

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