Department of Anthropology

Angela M. Nonaka


Affiliated FacultyPh.D., University of California, Los Angeles

Assistant Professor, School of Social Work
Angela M. Nonaka

Contact

Interests


Language socialization, sign languages and Deaf studies

Biography


nonaka

Research Interests:

Language Socialization, Social Foundations of Language, Language Ideologies, Language Ecology, Language Diversity and Language Endangerment, Sign Languages and Deaf Studies, Anthropological Fieldwork Methods, Descriptive Linguistics, Asian Studies, Anthropology of Disability.

Selected Publications:

2011. Language endangerment and language socialization. (In Duranti, A.; Ochs, E. and Schieffelin, B. (eds.) Handbook of language socialization. Wiley-Blackwell Press, 610-630.

2010. Interrogatives in Ban Khor Sign Language: A preliminary description. In Mathur, G. &  Napoli, D.J. (eds.) Deaf around the world: The impact of language. Oxford University Press, 194-220.

2009. Estimating size, scope, and membership of the speech/sign communities of undocumented indigenous/village sign languages: The Ban Khor case study. Language and Communication 29: 210-229.

2004. The forgotten endangered languages: Lessons on the importance of remembering from Thailand’s Ban Khor Sign Language. Language in Society 33: 737- 767.

1999. Learning Thai Sign Language Volumes #1-4. (English language translation). Bangkok: General Education Department and the National Association of the Deaf in Thailand.

Selected Grants and Fellowships:

  • 2009-(2013) “Linguistic Anthropological Description and Analysis of Ban Khor Sign Language,” (EuroBabel Initiative) National Science Foundation (US$250,000).
  • 2011-(12) Hunt Fellowship, a writing a publication fellowship from the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research (US$40,000).
  • 2010 “Teaching and Learning Together about Language Endangerment: U.S.-Dutch, Deaf- Hearing Collaborative Education at the 2010 3L International Summer School in Language Documentation and Description,” National Science Foundation (US$17,000).
  • 2003 “Pasa Bai: Language Socialization of an Indigenous Sign Language in a Northeastern Thai Village,” Wenner-Gren Foundation (US$20,000).
  • 2003 “Pasa Bai: Language Socialization of an Indigenous Sign Language in a Northeastern Thai Village,” IIE Fulbright. 
  • 2001 "Saving Signs from Ban Khor," a Field Research Grant, The Endangered Language Fund. 
  • 2001 "Saving Signs from Ban Khor," an Exploration Fund Grant, The Explorers’ Club.

Selected Research Findings:

"Anthropologist Works to Preserve Dying Sign Languages in Thailand"

Courses


ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

31185 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 0.112
(also listed as LIN 312)

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

         This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

         ‘Holism’ is one of the hallmarks of anthropological inquiry, and this course takes a holistic approach to the study of language. By the end of the term students should have gained a sense of how linguistic anthropology works as a profession and where it converges with or diverges from other domains of anthropology as well as other disciplines engaged in the study of culture and communication. More specifically, class members will learn to distinguish different definitions of and approaches to ‘language’ and recognize their respective implications. In this course, emphasis is placed on the study of language diversity and language use cross-culturally. Students will develop skills in investigating and understanding the role that language plays in the construction of culture and ways of thinking, for example, in producing commonly shared linguistic and cultural ideologies and practices. Finally, students will be given the opportunity to take the theories and concepts they learn in class and begin applying them to the ‘real world’; that is, students will begin developing basic skills in ethnographic observation, transcription and analysis.

 

ANT 393 • Language Socialization

31520 • Spring 2013
Meets T 400pm-700pm SAC 4.116
(also listed as LIN 396)

This seminar provides an introduction to and traces developments within the field of Language Socialization Studies, a relatively new but dynamic, rich, and diverse domain of research in contemporary linguistic anthropology. Language socialization research encompasses both theory and method and elucidates the interconnectedness of micro everyday and macro cultural phenomena. Traditionally, language socialization studies have focused on three primary lines of inquiry and their critical nexus: 1) the acquisition of language and communicative & cultural competence by children/novices, 2) children’s/novices’ socialization into language and communicative & cultural competence by adults/experts, and 3) the inextricable interplay between language and socialization as realized in the achievement, demonstration, transmission, and reproduction of linguistic, communicative, and cultural competence.

 

While the primary aim of this seminar is to familiarize students with contemporary language socialization research, the class is also designed to locate language socialization study within the larger field of anthropology. Students will be encouraged to think about language socialization as theory: comparing and contrasting it with other theoretical paradigms; locating language socialization’s emergence historically within the discipline; etc. Students will also be encouraged to consider language socialization as method: comparing and contrasting it with other linguistic anthropological methods; considering its cross-over applications for other sub-fields of anthropology; and pondering its utility for disciplines other than anthropology.

 

Mirroring the phenomenon of language socialization itself, this seminar will assist students in acquiring the language of and developing basic literacy in language socialization studies and in linguistic anthropology. In the process, students will be socialized into professional/academic competence: e.g., critical thinking, leading seminar discussions, making seminar presentations, organizing group presentations, and developing a research grant proposal. Students who enroll in the class are expected to 1) attend class regularly, 2) participate in classroom discussion and activities, and 3) complete all readings and assignments in a timely fashion. Specific assignments and requirements for this course are outlined in greater detail below.

ANT 392N • Intro To Grad Ling Anthropol

31395 • Fall 2012
Meets T 400pm-700pm SAC 4.116
(also listed as LIN 396)

An Anthropology Core Course, this course is an introduction to the theoretical and methodological foundations of the study of language from a sociocultural perspective. Topics discussed include linguistic, philosophical, psychological, sociological and anthropological contributions to the understanding of verbal and non-verbal communication as a social activity embedded in cultural contexts. No prior training in linguistics is presupposed. Readings include both ethnographic studies and theoretical work about language.

ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

30025 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WEL 2.256
(also listed as LIN 312)

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach. 

ANT 393 • Language Ideologies

30375 • Fall 2010
Meets M 400pm-700pm EPS 1.128
(also listed as LIN 396)

“Language ideologies,” broadly defined, refer to our attitudes, values, beliefs about, & by
extension practices involving, language. Language ideologies are inextricably linked in mutually
(re)instantiating ways to cultural ideologies & practices. Productively used by nation-states, ethnic
groups, professions, & group members to erect or erase boundaries within & outside the group, language
ideologies are especially important cultural resources in the construction of various identities.
Language ideologies & practices are ubiquitous & seem so ‘natural’ that they are typically taken
for granted, but current research on language ideologies challenges & problematizes many fundamental
assumptions about how speakers use their languages & communicative resources. Like other movements
in contemporary linguistic anthropology, language ideological research emphasizes language activity as
a form of action that is rooted in the socio-cultural context of its production. What distinguishes
language ideological research, however, is its consideration of two relatively neglected factors: 1)
speakers’ partial awareness & understanding of their own linguistic & communicative practices & 2) the
relationship of this awareness to the speaker’s socioeconomic or political economic perspective & to the
communicative practices themselves.

ANT 393 • Language Socialization

30730 • Fall 2009
Meets W 400pm-700pm EPS 1.128
(also listed as LIN 396)

Language Socialization
Course Number: ANT 393 & LIN 396
Special ID #: 30730 & 41640
Academic Term: Fall Semester 2009
Class Time & Location: Wednesdays 4pm - 7pm in EPS 1.128

Instructor: Dr. Angela M. Nonaka
E-mail: angelanonaka@mail.utexas.edu
Phone: (512) 232-1942
Office: EPS 4.136
Office hours: Wednesdays 3-4pm or by appointment

Course Overview:
This seminar provides an introduction to and traces developments within the field of Language Socialization Studies, a relatively new but dynamic, rich, and diverse domain of research in contemporary linguistic anthropology. Language socialization research encompasses both theory and method and elucidates the interconnectedness of micro everyday and macro cultural phenomena. Traditionally, language socialization studies have focused on three primary lines of inquiry and their critical nexus: 1) the acquisition of language and communicative & cultural competence by children/novices, 2) children’s/novices’ socialization into language and communicative & cultural competence by adults/experts, and 3) the inextricable interplay between language and socialization as realized in the achievement, demonstration, transmission, and reproduction of linguistic, communicative, and cultural competence.

While the primary aim of this seminar is to familiarize students with contemporary language socialization research, the class is also designed to locate language socialization study within the larger field of anthropology. Students will be encouraged to think about language socialization as theory: comparing and contrasting it with other theoretical paradigms; locating language socialization’s emergence historically within the discipline; etc. Students will also be encouraged to consider language socialization as method: comparing and contrasting it with other linguistic anthropological methods; considering its cross-over applications for other sub-fields of anthropology; and pondering its utility for disciplines other than anthropology.

Mirroring the phenomenon of language socialization itself, this seminar will assist students in acquiring the language of and developing basic literacy in language socialization studies and in linguistic anthropology. In the process, students will be socialized into professional/academic competence: e.g., critical thinking, leading seminar discussions, making seminar presentations, organizing group presentations, and developing a research grant proposal. Students who enroll in the class are expected to 1) attend class regularly, 2) participate in classroom discussion and activities, and 3) complete all readings and assignments in a timely fashion. Specific assignments and requirements for this course are outlined in greater detail below.
Readings:
• Packet of Readings (available at Abel’s Copies)
• 1 book (available at UT Co-Op Bookstore)
--Schieffelin, B. (1990). The Give and Take of Everyday Life: Language Socialization of Kaluli Children. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press.

Course Requirements:
Attendance and Participation
We are striving to create an intellectual community, and like any community, your presence and participation are crucial to the community’s vitality and success. Thus, you are expected to attend seminar regularly and inform the instructor (preferably in advance) of any occasions on which you will be absent, keeping in mind that you are still responsible for all class assignments. Interactive peer learning is another important part of language socialization study and process. Students, therefore, are strongly encouraged to think about and discuss real-world instances of, ideologies surrounding, and practices involving language socialization.

All assignments must be completed in a timely fashion. This is especially important in the context of a small seminar because the assignments are designed to inspire and facilitate thinking, discussion, and intellectual exchange. Assignments also help keep you on track reading, which is also crucial for a successful seminar learning experience

1.    Weekly précis of readings
Each student is expected to complete all of the readings for each class period. However, individual students will be responsible for individual articles within a given class period; practically speaking, this means that that each student will be assigned particular articles for which they must develop brief (e.g. 1-2 pages) précis which will be distributed to all members of the class and to the instructor. Weekly assignments should be completed and ready for distribution at the start of class. Each week, students will initiate discussion of their assigned articles. Students are encouraged to develop a notebook containing all the précis, a product of the seminar that will help prepare you for future exams, papers, etc.

2.    Weekly Questions or Commentaries on the Readings
Everyone in the seminar is required to complete a written commentary or to develop specific questions (500 words maximum) related to the weekly readings. Raise questions or issues that are “problematic” (either enigmatic or controversial) in your view. Bring hard copies of your commentaries/questions & distribute them at the beginning of class.

3.    Applied Exercises (See below Weeks 3 & 14)
a.    Analysis of in-class film, “Preschool in three cultures: Japan, China, and the US”
b.    Fieldwork observation of real-world language socialization

4.    Mini-Research Grant Proposal
Write a mini-research grant proposal (approx. 15 pages) specifying how language socialization illuminates a research topic of interest to you. (The page limit does not include the bibliography.) The proposal will consist of five sections:


I. Aims of Study (approx. 3 pages)
•    Propose a research study that can be fruitfully pursued through a language
socialization framework
•    Situate the proposed language socialization study in relation to a population or a site
      and motivate your selection.
•    In a few sentences, state why the project is timely and important in relation to current
      theoretical debates/issues
•    Specify 2-3 research questions related to the general research topic that the proposed
      project will address
II. Theoretical Background & Significance (approx. 5 pages)
•    Introduce 2-3 domains of inquiry related to your proposed study
•    Concisely review salient studies within each of these domains
•    Pilot study results: Present a small-scale analysis of research that you have carried out related to your proposed study:
-    Specify your pilot research focus and corpus
-    Provide analysis, using empirical data to illustrate preliminary observations and generalizations
III. Methodology  (approx. 4 pages)
•    Data Collection (corpus, procedures, duration)
•    Data Analysis (specify how the collected corpus will be analyzed in relation to the questions you are addressing)
IV. Contribution, Products, & Outcomes  (approx. 3 pages)
•    Explain how your research project will advance understanding
•    Specify what your study will generate
V. Bibliography
•    Language Socialization literature
•    Other sources

This assignment is meant to be practical and fun, encouraging investigation of your own topical interests while learning research grant writing skills. Several of the weekly assignments feed into the final paper. For example, if you do all the class readings, you’ll already have a robust bibliography of language socialization literature!) NOTE: The final written version of the mini-grant research proposal is due on 12/9/09. Except in extreme, documented hardship circumstances, late proposals will not be accepted.

Grading: (Plus/minus grades will be assigned as merited)
Weekly précis & questions/commentaries            30%
Applied Exercises (Weeks 3 & 14 @ 10% each)            20%
Oral in-class presentations (Weeks 9 & 15 @ 10% each)        20 %
Final written mini-research grant proposal            30 %

GOOD NEWS: For most of the first two-thirds of the semester the workload for this class is fairly light. Attend class, participate, keep up with the readings, and complete your weekly assignments, and all will be well! ?

NOTE: This course is heavily back-loaded. Keep in mind that during the early part of the semester, you should be reading, thinking, and preparing for the final assignment due at the end of the term: the written mini-research grant proposal. While this makes the end of the course a bit more intensive, the seminar is designed this way because students can only complete the final assignment after they successfully complete the class’s introduction and review of language socialization literature.

Policies:
Incompletes:
Incompletes will not be given except in unavoidable and dire circumstances.

Missing class:
If you must miss class, please let the instructor know, preferably ahead of your absence.

Religious Holidays:
If you need to miss a class or a deadline in order to observe a religious holiday anytime during the semester, the university requires that you let me know in writing two weeks before the absence.

Official Written (Medical) Excuses:
If you are unable to complete any course requirement due to a medical or another type of genuine emergency, please contact me as soon as possible to apprise me of the situation, and consistent with university policy, you might be asked to provide an official written excuse (e.g. from the UT health center, a doctor, the police department, etc.).

Special Needs:
If you have any special needs associated with any learning or physical disability, please see me. Before course accommodations can be made, you may be required to provide documentation for the Office of the Dean of Students—Services for Students with Disabilities. The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 512-471-6259 (or for TTY 512-471-4641).

Academic Honesty:
Academic misconduct is extremely rare at the graduate level, and I do not anticipate any problems in this regard. However, consistent with University recommendations and policies, a few basic points must be reiterated here. Proper citation of others’ words and ideas is required. Plagiarism is impermissible. If scholastic dishonesty is suspected, I am required to notify you and possibly turn the matter over to the Dean of Students office. Penalties for academic dishonesty include a failing grade on the assignment or in this course and possible expulsion from the university. If you have specific questions about these issues, contact the Office of the Dean of Students in FAC 248.

CALENDAR OF READINGS AND ASSIGNMENTS

Week 1: Wednesday, August 26, 2009
Introduction to the Enterprise
--Getting started: Introductions and bureaucratic housekeeping
--Overview lecture and discussion: Traditional methodologies for studying language and socialization in anthropology (e.g. study of language in linguistics, anthropological linguistics and linguistic anthropology; studies of socialization in sociocultural and psychocultural anthropology).

Week 2: Wednesday, September 2, 2009
Language Socialization and Ethnography
Discussion: Language socialization as theory and method, ethnography, anthropology and cross-cultural comparison, the micro and the macro, particularism and universalism

Readings (complete prior to class):
• Schieffelin, B. (1990). The Give and Take of Everyday Life: Language Socialization of Kaluli Children. Cambridge & New York: Cambridge University Press.

Assignment (due at start of class):
Everyone in Class:
1.    Complete all readings
2.    Distribute weekly précis & commentaries/questions to seminar members

Week 3: Wednesday, September 9, 2009 (Peer-led Session)
Applied Analytical Exercise

Readings (complete prior to class):
•  Tobin, J.J., Wu, D.Y.H., & Davidson, D.H. (1989). Preschool in three cultures: Japan, China, and the United States. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.)
***Book available electronically or in hard copy on reserve at the PCL library)***

Film: Preschool in Three Cultures: Japan, China, and the United States
Assignment:
Everyone in Class:
1.    Watch film: “Preschool in Three Cultures: Japan, China, and the United States”
2.    Discuss as a group, preparing for your individual papers (see #3 below)
3.    Write a paper (max. 10 pages) next week DUE 9/16/09 at the start of class.
Compare and contrast language socialization among the Kaluli and the three preschools in the film and in Schieffelin’s and Tobin’s ethnographic accounts. The essay is open-ended, but you must utilize the ethnographic materials (and other readings if you like) in a coherent paper about language socialization, as theory and/or method. You might discuss commonalities or differences in the goals of socialization in these societies; sites of socialization; methods of socialization; discourses about socialization; etc.

Week 4:    Wednesday, September 16, 2009
Establishment of Language Socialization as a Field of Inquiry
Discussion: Concepts and scope of language socialization; earlier psychological, linguistic, and anthropological approaches to child development

Readings (complete prior to class):
• Piker, S. (1964). Introduction (pp. v-viii) & Chapter III: Socialization of the Child (pp. 153-271). In An Examination of Character and Socialization in a Thai Peasant Community. Unpublished Ph.D. Dissertation. Department of Anthropology, University of Washington.
• Ochs, E. and Schieffelin, B. (1979). Introduction: What Child Language Can Contribute to Pragmatics. Developmental Pragmatics. New York: Academic Press pp.1-17.
• Ochs, E. and Schieffelin, B. (1984). Language Acquisition and Socialization: Three Developmental Stories and Their Implications. In R. Shweder & R. Levine (Eds.), Culture Theory: Essays on Mind, Self and Emotion. New York: Cambridge University.
• Ochs, Elinor &  Schieffelin, Bambi. 1995. The impact of language socialization. In Paul Fletcher & Brian MacWhinney (Eds.), The Handbook of Child Language (73-94). Oxford and Cambridge, MA: Blackwell Publishers Inc.
• Garrett, P.B. & Baquedano-Lopez, P. (2002). Language Socialization: Reproduction and Continuity, Transformation and Change. Annual Review of Anthropology 31: 339-61.

Assignment (due at start of class):
Everyone in Class:
1.    Complete all readings
2.    Distribute weekly précis & commentaries/questions to seminar members

Week 5: Wednesday, September 23, 2009
Development and Learning in a Social World
Discussion: Activity theory; zone of proximal development; apprenticeship; guided participation; legitimate peripheral participation; linguistic and interactional resources for socialization (co-construction, indexicality, etc.)

Readings (complete prior to class):
• Introduction to the Study of Language Development. In Hoff, Erika (2001). Language Development. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, pp. 1-35.
• Biological Bases of Language Development. In Hoff, Erika (2001). Language Development. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, pp. 36-91.
• Wertsch, J. (1991). A Sociocultural Approach to Socially Shared Cognition. In L. Resnick, J. Levine & S. Teasley (eds.), Perspectives on Socially Shared Cognition. Washtington, D.C.: APA, pp. 85-100.
• Rogoff, B. (1990). Apprenticeship in Thinking. Oxford University Press. pp. 3-61.
• Lave, J. (1991). Situating Learning in Communities of Practice. In L. Resnick, J. Levine & S. Teasley (eds.), Perspectives on Socially Shared Cognition. Washington, D.C.: APA, pp. 63-82.

Assignment (due at start of class):
Everyone in Class:
1.    Complete all readings
2.    Distribute weekly précis & commentaries/questions to seminar members

Week 6: Wednesday, September 30, 2009
Baby Talk: Novices as Speakers, Addressees & Overhearers
Discussion: Linguistic features, language ideologies, cultural expectations, and socialization practices surrounding baby talk
Readings (complete prior to class):
• Ferguson, C. (1977). Baby Talk as a Simplified Register. In C. E. Snow & C. A. Ferguson (eds.), Talking to Children: Language Input and Acquisition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 209-235.
• Rogoff, B. (1990). Apprenticeship in Thinking. Oxford University Press. pp. 65-109.
• Rogoff, B. (1990). Apprenticeship in Thinking. Oxford University Press. pp. 110-134.
• DeLeón, L. (1998). The Emergent Participant: Interactive Patterns in the Socialization of Tzotzil (Mayan) Infants. Journal of Linguistic Anthropology, 8(2), 131-161.
• Ochs, E., Solomon,O., & Sterponi, L. (2005) Limitations and Transformations of Habitus in Child-Directed Communication.  Discourse Studies 7(4-5), 547-583.

Assignment (due at start of class):
Everyone in Class:
1.    Complete all readings
2.    Distribute weekly précis & commentaries/questions to seminar members

Week 7: Wednesday, October 7, 2009
Developing Linguistic and Cultural Competence

Readings (complete prior to class):
• Watson-Gegeo, K.A. & Gegeo, D.W. (1986). Calling-out and repeating routines in Kwara’ae children’s language socialization. In E. Ochs & B. Schieffelin (Eds.), Language socialization across cultures (17-50). Cambridge & New York: Cambridge University Press.
• Demuth, K. (1986). Prompting routines in the language socialization of Basotho children. In E. Ochs & B. Schieffelin (Eds.), Language socialization across cultures (51-79). Cambridge & New York: Cambridge University Press.
• Peters, A.M. & Boggs, S.T. (1986). Interactional routines as cultural influences upon language acquisition. In E. Ochs & B. Schieffelin (Eds.), Language socialization across cultures (80-96). Cambridge & New York: Cambridge University Press.
• Platt, M. (1986). Social norms and lexical acquisition: a study of deictic verbs in Samoan child language. In E. Ochs & B. Schieffelin (Eds.), Language socialization across cultures (127-152). Cambridge & New York: Cambridge University Press.
• Andersen, E.S. The acquisition of register variation by Anglo-American children. In E. Ochs & B. Schieffelin (Eds.), Language socialization across cultures (153-161). Cambridge & New York: Cambridge University Press.

Assignment (due at start of class):
Everyone in Class:
1.    Complete all readings
2.    Distribute weekly précis & commentaries/questions to seminar members

Week 8: Wednesday, October 14, 2009
Language Socialization, Language Maintenance and Language Shift
Discussion: On Language socialization practices that impact language and culture continuity and change.

Readings (complete prior to class):
• Kulick, D. (1993). Growing Up Monolingual in a Multilingual Community:  How Language Socialization Patterns Are Leading to Language Shift in Gapun (Papua New Guinea). In K. Hyltenstam & A. Viberg (eds.), Progression and Regression in Language:  Sociocultural, Neuropsychological and Linguistic Perspectives (pp. 94-121). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
• Garrett, Paul (2005) What a Language Is Good for: Language Socialization, Language Shift, and the Persistence of Code-Specific Genres in St. Lucia. Language in Society 34, 327-361.
• Hoffman, Katherine E. 2006. Berber language ideologies, maintenance, and contraction:
Gendered variation in the indigenous margins of Morocco. Language and Communication 26:144-167.
• Fader, Ayala. 2007. Reclaiming sacred sparks: Linguistic syncretism and gendered language shift among Hasidic Jews in New York. Journal of Linguistic Anthropology 17 (1):1-22.
• Meek, Barbra A. 2007. “Respecting the Language of Elders: Ideological Shift and Linguistic Discontinuity in a Northern Athapascan Community.” Journal of Linguistic Anthropology 17 (1):  23-43.

Assignment (due at start of class):
Everyone in Class:
1.    Complete all readings
2.    Distribute weekly précis & commentaries/questions to seminar members

Week 9: Wednesday, October 21, 2009
Mini-grant research proposal (part I): Presentation & Review
In-class instructor review: First drafts of mini-grant research proposals
Q&A/Discussion: Remaining sections of the mini-grant research proposal

Assignment (distribute hard copy to instructor & classmates at start of class):
Everyone in Class:
1.    Submit a draft of your mini-grant research proposal.
2.    Provide oral feedback to classmates

Week 10:    Wednesday, October 28, 2009
Authoritative Knowledge
Discussion: On socialization into and through language practices that attempt to establish social asymmetry and control how novices act, think, and feel.

Readings (complete prior to class):
• Jacoby, S. & Gonzales, P. (1991). The Constitution of Expert-Novice in Scientific Discourse. Issues in Applied Linguistics, 2: 149-81.
• He, A. (2000). The Grammatical and Interactional Organization of Teachers’ Directives:  Implications for Socialization for Chinese-American Children. Linguistics & Education, 11 (2), 119-140.
• Cook, H. M. (1990). The Role of the Japanese Sentence-final Particle no in the Socialization of Children. Multilingua, 9(4), 377-395.
• Howard, Kathryn (2005).  Socializing Respect at School in Northern Thailand. Working Papers in Educational Linguistics, 20, 1, 1-30.
• Goodwin, M. H. (2003). Styles of Parent-Child Interaction in Directive-Response Sequence. UCLA Center on Everyday Lives of Families Working Paper no. 19.

Assignment (due at start of class):
Everyone in Class:
1.    Complete all readings
2.    Distribute weekly précis & commentaries/questions to seminar members

Week 11:    Wednesday, November 4, 2009
Moral Practices
Discussion: Socialization into and through language practices that index and construct moral reasoning, values, and worldviews.

Readings (complete prior to class):
• Capps, L., & Ochs, E. (2002). Cultivating Prayer. In C. Ford, B. Fox & S. Thompson (Eds.), The Language of Turn and Sequence. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 39-55.
• He, A. W. (2001). The Language of Ambiguity: Practices in Chinese Language Heritage Classes. Discourse Studies, 3(1), 75-96.
• Rymes, B. (1996). Rights to Advise: Advice as an Emergent Phenomenon in Student-Teacher Talk. Linguistics and Education, 8, 409-437.
• Sterponi, L. (2003). Account Episodes in Family Discourse: the Making of Morality in Everyday Interaction. Discourse Studies, 5(1), 79-100.
• Ochs, E. & Taylor, C. (1992). Family Narrative as Political Activity. Discourse and Society, 3(3), 301-340.
• Miller, P., Potts, R., Fung, H., Hoogstra, L. & Mintz, J. (1990). Narrative Practices and the Social Construction of Self in Childhood. American Ethnologist, 17(2), 292-311.

Assignment (due at start of class):
Everyone in Class:
1.    Complete all readings
2.    Distribute weekly précis & commentaries/questions to seminar members

Week 12:    Wednesday, November 11, 2009
Problem-solving Practices
Discussion: Socialization into and through language practices that engage novices in problem-solving activities.

Readings (complete prior to class):
• Ochs, E. & Taylor, C. (1992). Science at Dinner. In C. Kramsch & S. McConnell-Ginet (eds.), Text and Context:  Cross-Disciplinary: Perspectives on Language Study. Lexington, Mass.: D.C. Heath. Pp. 29-45.
• Chavajay,P. & Rogoff, B. (2002).  Schooling and Traditional Collaborative Social Organization of Problem Solving by Mayan Mothers and Children. Developmental Psychology, 38(1), 55-66.
• Sterponi, L. & Santagata, R. (2000). Mistakes in the Classroom and at the Dinner Table: A Comparison between Socialization Practices in Italy and United States. Crossroads of Language, Interaction and Culture, 3, 57-72.
• Ochs, E. & Jacoby, S. (1997). Down to the Wire:  The Cultural Clock of Physicists and the Discourse of Consensus. Language in Society, 26(4), 479-506.

Assignment (due at start of class):
Everyone in Class:
1.    Complete all readings
2.    Distribute weekly précis & commentaries/questions to seminar members

Week 13:    Wednesday, November 18, 2009
Socializing Literacy & Identity
Discussion: Socialization into and through language practices that index and construct statuses, roles, relationships, group and individual positionings, including
discursive structuring of gender across the life span.

Readings (complete prior to class):
• Brice Heath, S. (1986). What no bedtime story means: narrative skills at home and school. In E. Ochs & B. Schieffelin (Eds.), Language socialization across cultures (97-124). Cambridge & New York: Cambridge University Press.
• Zinsser, Caroline. 1986. For the bible tells me so: Teaching children in a fundamentalist church. In B.B. Schieffelin & P. Galimore, (Eds.), Acquisition of Literacy: Ethnographic Perspectives (55-71). Norwood, NJ: Ablex.
• Duranti, Alessandro & Ochs, Elinor. 1986. Literacy instruction in a Samoan village. In
B.B. Schieffelin & P. Galimore, (Eds.), Acquisition of Literacy: Ethnographic Perspectives (213-232). Norwood, NJ: Ablex.
• Moore, Leslie C. 2008. Body, text, and talk in Maroua Fulbe Qur’anic schooling. Text and Talk 28 (5): 643-665.
• Baquedano-López, P. (2000). Narrating Community in Doctrina Classes. Narrative Inquiry, 10(2), 429-452.
• Mehan, H. (1996). The Construction of an LD Student: A Case Study in the Politics of Representation. In M. Silverstein & G. Urban (eds.), Natural Histories of Discourse. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Pp. 253-276.

Assignment (due at start of class):
Everyone in Class:
1.    Complete all readings
2.    Distribute weekly précis & commentaries/questions to seminar members



Week 14:    Wednesday, November 25, 2009
Applied Exercise: Fieldwork

Readings: (None this week)

Assignment: (due 12/9/09, as per instructions below)
Everyone in Class:
1.    Conduct pilot study/mini-ethnographic fieldwork of language socialization in the real world and write up report.
2.    Your field report may be either
a.    Incorporated in your final mini-grant proposal (see Section II, subsection “Pilot study results).
OR
b.    Independent of the mini-grant proposal—i.e., a phenomenon-specific analysis of language socialization that draws on concepts and readings from the course (e.g. max. 10 pages), to be turn in along with your mini-grant proposal on 12/9/09.

Week 15: Wednesday, December 2, 2009 (Peer-Led Session)
Final in-class oral presentations & peer evaluations
Assignment (to be completed in class by each seminar member):
1.    Give individual presentations
2.    Provide feedback to your fellows
3.    Provide summary for instructor in audiotape, videotape, or written format (Note: Format to be decided and produced collaboratively by class)

***Final written mini-grant proposal DUE Dec. 9, 2009 by 5pm***
1.    Place hard copy of mini-grant research proposal in instructor’s mailbox
2.    Electronic copies will not be accepted
3.    Fieldwork reports that are not incorporated into the final mini-grant proposal are also due. (See the instructions in Week 14).

ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

29755 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm WAG 201
(also listed as LIN 312)

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

Curriculum Vitae


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