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Madeline Y. Hsu, Director BUR 480, Mailcode A2200, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6427

Core and Affiliated Faculty Publications

Mia Carter

Archives of Empire: Volume I. From The East India Company to the Suez Canal (Duke University Press Books, 2003) Co-editor

Archives of Empire: Volume 2. The Scramble for Africa (Duke University Press Books, 2004) Co-editor

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A rich collection of primary materials, the multivolume Archives of Empire provides a documentary history of nineteenth-century British imperialism from the Indian subcontinent to the Suez Canal to southernmost Africa. Barbara Harlow and Mia Carter have carefully selected a diverse range of texts that track the debates over imperialism in the ranks of the military, the corridors of political power, the lobbies of missionary organizations, the halls of royal geographic and ethnographic societies, the boardrooms of trading companies, the editorial offices of major newspapers, and far-flung parts of the empire itself. Focusing on a particular region and historical period, each volume in Archives of Empire is organized into sections preceded by brief introductions. Documents including mercantile company charters, parliamentary records, explorers’ accounts, and political cartoons are complemented by timelines, maps, and bibligraphies. Unique resources for teachers and students, these books reveal the complexities of nineteenth-century colonialism and emphasize its enduring relevance to the “global markets” of the twenty-first century.

Imperialism and Orientalism: A Documentary Sourcebook (Wiley-Blackwell, 1999) Co-editor

carterimpImperialism and Orientalism assembles an unprecedented collection of archival and documentary materials that maps the ideological and political grounds for late eighteenth- and nineteenth-century British and European colonialism in Africa, South Asia, and the Middle East.










Modernism and Literature: An Introduction and Reader (Routledge, 2013) Co-editor

CarterModThis volume offers a comprehensive representation of the exciting, pivotal, and urgent nature of literary Modernism, as well as more recent approaches including the "global turn." Modernism can be difficult to understand without an awareness of contemporary concerns, so Mia Carter and Alan Friedman incorporate texts from a wide variety of disciplines such as art, politics, science, medicine, and philosophy.

This volume's thoroughly explained, informative, and interesting discussions provide:

  • An extensive introduction outlining the history and debates surrounding the movement
  • Numeruos foundational texts of Modernism such as Darwin, Duncan, Nietzsche, Einstein, Freud, Hughes, Luxemburg, Nietzsche, Stein, Zola
  • Full texts and extracts representing Modernist writers - including Anand, Conrad, Eliot, James, Hurston, Lawrence, Wilde, Woolf and Yeats, as critics of themselves and their contemporaries
  • A chronology of key historical events and publications
  • A glossary of key terms, people, theories and themes
  • A detailed further reading section offering advice on further study and research
  • A companion website (www.routledge.com/cw/carter) featuring an interactive timeline with dates and images that contextualise the literature of the period, as well as author biographies and links to additional resources and videos.

Addressing current as well as historical debates about Modernism, this book includes discussion of the Harlem Renaissance, feminism and women’s writing, international and global movements and anti-imperialism, while acknowledging the variety of competing modernisms. This is the ideal guide for anyone seeking an overview and an in-depth treatment of this complex cultural turn and its foundational texts.

Rowena Fong

Intersecting Child Welfare, Substance Abuse, and Family Violence: Culturally Competent Approaches (Council on Social Work Education, 2006) Co-author

Fong1Developed from a task force meeting held in 2001 by the Council on Social Work Education, Casey Family Programs, and the University of Texas at Austin School of Social Work, Intersecting Child Welfare, Substance Abuse, and Family Violence examines these three issues in the context of culturally competent social work practice. Eighty percent of child welfare cases include issues with substance abuse and domestic violence. Disproportionately high numbers of these child welfare cases also involve minority families from the four main ethnic groups - African Americans, Latinos, First Nations Peoples, and Asian and Pacific Islanders. Each of the seventeen chapters, written by pioneers in a variety of fields, addresses sociodemographics; the history of child welfare, substance abuse, and family violence; the problems encountered; and the recommendations for future directions in practice, policy, and research. These recommendations challenge educators, policy makers, and researchers to examine the impact of institutional racism and poverty in their role of perpetuating the oppression of people of color. This book is intended to guide national efforts in education and research, organizational change, and policy making.

Culturally Competent Practice with Immigrant and Refugee Children and Families (Social Work Practice with Children and Families)(The Guilford Press, 2003) Editor

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Meeting a crucial need for social workers and other practitioners, as well as students, this authoritative text covers the breadth of issues involved in working with immigrant and refugee children and families. Within an innovative conceptual framework, essential knowledge is presented to guide culturally competent practice with clients from over 14 immigrant groups whose numbers are growing in the United States today. Expert authors review the history of each group's migration to the U.S. and discuss key issues facing families, including cultural conflicts, trauma associated with refugee experiences and/or illegal status, and the effects of poverty and discrimination. Particular attention is given to ways that the practitioner can help families draw on culturally based resources for coping and resilience as they navigate the challenges of their new lives. Throughout, recommendations for strengths-based assessment and intervention are brought to life in detailed case examples.

Culturally Competent Practice: Skills, Interventions, and Evaluations (Pearson, 2001) Co-author

Fong3This comprehensive social work book discusses how to work with clients of four major ethnic backgrounds: African-American, Latino/Hispanic-American, First Nations People, and Asians/Pacific Islanders. The book shows readers how to approach helping by first understanding the world view of each of these groups. Each chapter includes indigenous strategies and/or a biculturalization approach to assessments, interventions, and evaluations. Levels of practice include individuals, families, organizations, and communities. Each chapter includes case vignettes that illustrate the helping strategies. For social workers and social work students interested in culturally competent social work practice, or diversity practice.

Heather Hindman

Meeting the Global: Expatria's Forms and Consequences in Kathmandu (Stanford University Press, 2013)

HindmanTransnational business people, international aid workers, and diplomats are all actors on the international stage working for organizations and groups often scrutinized by the public eye. But the very lives of these global middlemen and women are relatively unstudied. Mediating the Global takes up the challenge, uncovering the day-to-day experiences of elite foreign workers and their families living in Nepal, and the policies and practices that determine their daily lives. In this book, Heather Hindman calls for a consideration of the complex role that global middlemen and women play, not merely in implementing policies, but as objects of policy.

Examining the lives of expatriate professionals working in Kathmandu, Nepal and the families that accompany them, Hindman unveils intimate stories of the everyday life of global mediators. Mediating the Global focuses on expatriate employees and families who are affiliated with international development bodies, multinational corporations, and the foreign service of various countries. The author investigates the life of expatriates while they visit recreational clubs and international schools and also examines how the practices of international human resources management, cross-cultural communication, and promotion of flexible careers are transforming the world of elite overseas workers.

Madeline Hsu

Dreaming of Gold, Dreaming of Home: Transnationalism and Migration Between the United States and South China, 1882-1943 (Stanford University Press, 2000)

Hsu1This book is a highly original study of transnationalism among immigrants from Taishan, a populous coastal county in south China from which, until 1965, the majority of Chinese in the United States originated. Drawing creatively on Chinese-language sources such as gazetteers, newspapers, and magazines, supplemented by fieldwork and interviews as well as recent scholarship in Chinese social history, the author presents a much richer depiction than we have had heretofore of the continuing ties between Taishanese remaining in China and their kinsmen seeking their fortune in “Gold Mountain.”

Long after the gold in California ran out and prejudice confined them to dismal Chinatowns, generations of Chinese—mostly men from rural areas of southern China—continued to migrate to the United States in hopes of bettering the family’s lot by remitting much of the meager sums they earned as laundrymen, cooks, domestic workers, and Chinatown merchants.

Economic hardships and U.S. Exclusion laws extended the immigrants’ separation from their families for decades, “sojourns” that in many cases ended only in death. Men lived as bachelors and their wives as widows, parents passed away, and children grew up without ever seeing their fathers’ faces. Families and village communities had to adapt to survive the stress of long-term, long-distance separation from their primary wage-earners.

At the same time, men raised in the rural communities of a faltering imperial China had to negotiate encounters with an industrializing, Western-dominated, often hostile world. This history explores the resiliency and flexibility of rural Chinese, qualities that enabled them to preserve their families by living apart from them and to survive the intertwining of their rural world with global systems of race, labor, and capital. The author demonstrates that through migration to dank and narrow enclaves, they came to live, and even to flourish, in a transnational community that persisted despite decades of separation and an ocean’s width of distance.

Chinese Americans and the Politics of Race and Culture (Temple University Press, 2008) Co-editor

Hsu2This collection offers multifaceted explorations of how Chinese Americans have shaped their ethnic culture and identities to claim recognition and acceptance as participants in America's multiracial, multicultural democratic state. In a field that has recently demonstrated its centrality to American processes of racialized nation-state and ideological formations, these articles represent a cutting edge in American, immigration, and ethnic studies.Sucheng Chan introduces this valuable new anthology with a commanding discussion of the field of Chinese American studies, in which she examines its history and points the way ahead. Here, she and Madeline Y. Hsu have brought together leading-edge scholarship from a new generation of thinkers, as useful for scholars as it is for undergraduate readers. The contributors address a broad range of issues, from the activism of left-wing and Communist Chinese immigrants to the U.S. in the 1920s and early 1930s and humanitarian relief during the Sino-Japanese War to the construction of new Chinese regional identities in New York.

S. Akbar Hyder

Reliving Karbala: Martyrdom in South Asian Memory (Oxford University Press, USA, 2008)

Hyder1In 680 C.E., a small band of the Prophet Muhammads family and their followers, led by his grandson, Husain, rose up in a rebellion against the ruling caliph, Yazid. The family and its supporters, hopelessly outnumbered, were massacred at Karbala, in modern-day Iraq. The story of Karbala is the cornerstone of institutionalized devotion and mourning for millions of Shii Muslims. Apart from its appeal to the Shii community, invocations of Karbala have also come to govern mystical and reformist discourses in the larger Muslim world. Indeed, Karbala even serves as the archetypal resistance and devotional symbol for many non-Muslims. Until now, though, little scholarly attention has been given to the widespread and varied employment of the Karbala event.

In Reliving Karbala, Syed Akbar Hyder examines the myriad ways that the Karbala symbol has provided inspiration in South Asia, home to the worlds largest Muslim population. Rather than a unified reading of Islam, Hyder reveals multiple, sometimes conflicting, understandings of the meaning of Islamic religious symbols like Karbala. He ventures beyond traditional, scriptural interpretations to discuss the ways in which millions of very human adherents express and practice their beliefs. By using a panoramic array of sources, including musical performances, interviews, nationalist drama, and other literary forms, Hyder traces the evolution of this story from its earliest historical origins to the beginning of the twenty-first century.

Today, Karbala serves as a celebration of martyrdom, a source of personal and communal identity, and even a tool for political protest and struggle. Hyder explores how issues related to gender, genre, popular culture, class, and migrancy bear on the cultivation of religious symbols. He assesses the manner in which religious language and identities are negotiated across contexts and continents.

At a time when words like martyrdom, jihad, and Shiism are being used and misused for political reasons, this book provides much-needed scholarly redress. Through his multifaceted examination of this seminal event in Islamic history, Hyder offers an original, complex, and nuanced view of religious symbols.

Let’s Study Urdu: An Introduction to the Script (Yale University Press, 2007) Co-author

Hyder2Let’s Study Urdu! is a comprehensive introduction to the Urdu language that draws on a range of real-life contexts, popular film songs, and prized works of Urdu literature. A variety of effective aural, oral, and written drills will help students master the language while keeping them entertained. Let’s Study Urdu! provides students of diverse backgrounds, including heritage speakers, the opportunity to enhance their competency over basic grammatical structures so that they can comfortably use the language in Urdu-speaking milieus from South Asia, the Middle East, Europe, and North America.


Shanti Kumar

Ghandi Meets Primetime: Globalization and Nationalism in Indian Television (University of Illinois Press, 2005)

Kumar1Shanti Kumar's Ghandi Meets Primetime, examines how cultural imaginations of national identity have been transformed by the rapid growth of satellite and cable television in postcolonial India. To evaluate the growing influence of foreign and domestic satellite and cable channels since 1991, the book considers a wide range of materials including contemporary television programming, historical archives, legal documents, policy statements, academic writings and journalistic accounts. Kumar argues that India's hybrid national identity is manifested in the discourses found in this variety of empirical sources. He deconstructs representations of Mahatma Gandhi as the Father of the Nation on the state-sponsored network Doordarshan and those found on Rupert Murdoch's STAR TV network. The book closely analyzes print advertisements to trace the changing status of the television set as a cultural commodity in postcolonial India, and examines publicity brochures, promotional materials and programming schedules of Indian-language networks to outline the role of vernacular media in the discourse of electronic capitalism. The empirical evidence is illuminated by theoretical analyses that combine diverse approaches such as cultural studies, poststructuralism and postcolonial criticism. Shanti Kumar is an assistant professor of communication arts at the University of Wisconsin, and coeditor of "Planet TV: A Global Television Reader". A volume in the series Popular Culture and Politics in Asia Pacific, edited by Poshek Fu.


Planet TV: A Global Television Reader (NYU Press, 2002) Co-editor

Kumar2From the 1967 live satellite program "Our World" to MTV music videos in Indonesia, from French television in Senegal to the global syndication of African American sitcoms, and from representations of terrorism on German television to the international Teletubbies phenomenon, TV lies at the nexus of globalization and transnational culture.

Planet TV provides an overview of the rapidly changing landscape of global television, combining previously published essays by pioneers of the study of television with new work by cutting-edge television scholars who refine and extend intellectual debates in the field. Organized thematically, the volume explores such issues as cultural imperialism, nationalism, postcolonialism, transnationalism, ethnicity and cultural hybridity. These themes are illuminated by concrete examples and case studies derived from empirical work on global television industries, programs, and audiences in diverse social, historical, and cultural contexts.

Developing a new critical framework for exploring the political, economic, sociological and technological dimensions of television cultures, and countering the assumption that global television is merely a result of the current dominance of the West in world affairs, Planet TV demonstrates that the global dimensions of television were imagined into existence very early on in its contentious history. Parks and Kumar have assembled the critical moments in television's past in order to understand its present and future.

Robert M. Oppenheim

Kyongju Things: Assembling Place (University of Michigan Press, 2008)

OppenheimKyongju is South Korea's preeminent "culture city," an urban site rich with archaeological wonders that residents compare to those of Nara, Xian, and Rome. By examining these ancient objects in relation to the controversies that engulfed South Korea's high-speed railway line when it was first proposed in the 1990s, Kyongju Things offers a grounded and theoretically sophisticated account of South Korean development and citizenship in the last quarter of the twentieth century. Its sensitivity to issues of place, knowledge, and cultural heritage and its innovative use of network theory will be of interest to a wide range of scholars in anthropology, Asian studies, the history of science and technology, cultural geography, urban planning, and political science.

Sharmila Rudrappa

Ethnic Routes to Becoming American: Indian Immigrants and the Cultures of Citizenship (Rutgers University Press, 2004)

RudrappaHow does an immigrant become an ethnic American? And does American society fundamentally alter because of these newcomers?

In Ethnic Routes to Becoming American, Sharmila Rudrappa examines the paths South Asian immigrants in Chicago take toward assimilation in the late twentieth-century United States, where deliberations on citizenship rights are replete with the politics of recognition. She takes us inside two ethnic institutions, a battered women’s shelter, Apna Ghar, and a cultural organization, the Indo American Center, to show how immigrant activism, which brings cultural difference into public sphere debates, ironically abets these immigrants’ assimilation. She interlaces ethnographic details with political-philosophical debates on the politics of recognition and redistribution. In this study on the under-researched topic of the incorporation of South Asian immigrants into the American polity, Sharmila Rudrappa compels us to rethink ethnic activism, participatory democracy, and nation-building processes.

Snehal Shingavi

The Mahatma Misunderstood: The Politics and Forms of Literary Nationalism in India (Anthem Press, 2013)

ShingaviThe Mahatma Misunderstood studies the relationship between the production of novels in late-colonial India and nationalist agitation promoted by the Indian National Congress. The volume examines the process by which novelists who were critically engaged with Gandhian nationalism, and who saw both the potentials and the pitfalls of Gandhian political strategies, came to be seen as the Mahatma’s standard-bearers rather than his loyal opposition.







Nancy Stalker

Prophet Motive: Deguchi Onisaburo, Oomoto, and the Rise of New Religion in Japan (University of Hawaii Press, 2008)

StalkerFrom the 1910s to the mid-1930s, the flamboyant and gifted spiritualist Deguchi Onisaburô (1871-1948) transformed his mother-in-law's small, rural religious following into a massive movement, eclectic in content and international in scope. Through a potent blend of traditional folk beliefs and practices like divination, exorcism, and millenarianism, an ambitious political agenda, and skillful use of new forms of visual and mass media, he attracted millions to Oomoto, his Shintoist new religion. Despite its condemnation as a heterodox sect by state authorities and the mainstream media, Oomoto quickly became the fastest-growing religion in Japan of the time.

In telling the story of Onisaburô and Oomoto, Nancy Stalker not only gives us the first full account in English of the rise of a heterodox movement in imperial Japan, but also provides new perspectives on the importance of "charismatic entrepreneurship" in the success of new religions around the world. She makes the case that these religions often respond to global developments and tensions (imperialism, urbanization, consumerism, the diffusion of mass media) in similar ways. They require entrepreneurial marketing and management skills alongside their spiritual authority if their groups are to survive encroachments by the state and achieve national/international stature. Their drive to realize and extend their religious view of the world ideally stems from a "prophet" rather than "profit" motive, but their activity nevertheless relies on success in the modern capitalist, commercial world.

Unlike many studies of Japanese religion during this period, Prophet Motive works to dispel the notion that prewar Shinto was monolithically supportive of state initiatives and ideology.

Cynthia Talbot

Knowing India: Colonial and Modern Constructions of the Past (Yoda Press, 2011)

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Knowing India honors the contributions of Thomas R. Trautmann to the fields of anthropology and history by presenting research from leading scholars who are his contemporaries, colleagues, and former students. Divided into four sections, the 17 essays in this volume look at modes of conceptualizing and classifying traditional South Asian society, perceptions of the precolonial past in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and aspects of precolonial India's historical development and writing. Contributors include reputed contemporaries of Trautmann such as Madhav Deshpande, David Lorenzen, Romila Thapar, and Sylvia Vatuk, as well as former students like Shah Mahmoud Hanifi, Bhavani Raman, and Parna Sengupta who engage with and take off from questions raised by Trautmann. Also containing essays by Michael Dodson, Kenneth Hall, Anne Hardgrove, Judith Irvine, Carla Sinopoli, and Cynthia Talbot, the book ends with three tributes to Trautmann by Tom Fricke, Richard H. Davis and Rama Mantena.

India Before Europe (Cambridge University Press, 2006), Co-Author

Talbot2India is a land of enormous diversity. Cross-cultural influences are everywhere in evidence, in the food people eat, the clothes they wear, and in the places they worship. This was ever the case, and at no time more so than in the India that existed from 1200 to 1750, before the European intervention. This beautifully illustrated book takes the reader on a journey across the political, religious and cultural landscapes of medieval India. It is fluently composed, with a cast of characters that will educate students and general readers alike.






Precolonial India in Practice: Society, Region, and Identity in Medieval Andhra (Oxford University Press, USA, 2001)

Talbot3The society of traditional India is frequently characterized as static and dominated by caste. This study challenges older interpretations, arguing that medieval India was actually a time of dynamic change and fluid social identities. Using records of religious endowments from Andhra Pradesh, author Cynthia Talbot reconstructs a regional society of the precolonial past as it existed in practice.








Kamala Visweswaran

Fictions Of Feminist Ethnography (University Of Minnesota Press, 1994)

Visweswaran1Although feminist ethnography is an emerging genre, the question of what the term means remains open. Recent texts which fall under this rubric rely on unexamined notions of “sisterhood” and the recovery of “lost” voices. In these essays about her work with women in Southern India, Kamala Visweswaran addresses such troubled issues. Blurring distinctions between ethnographic and literary genres, these essays employ the narrative strategies of history, fiction, autobiography and biography, deconstruction, and post-colonial discourse to reveal the fictions of ethnography and the ethnography in fiction.

Although feminist ethnography is an emerging genre, the question of what the term means remains open. Recent texts which fall under this rubric rely on unexamined notions of “sisterhood” and the recovery of “lost” voices. In these essays about her work with women in Southern India, Kamala Visweswaran addresses such troubled issues. Blurring distinctions between ethnographic and literary genres, these essays employ the narrative strategies of history, fiction, autobiography and biography, deconstruction, and post-colonial discourse to reveal the fictions of ethnography and the ethnography in fiction.

Un/common Cultures: Racism and the Rearticulation of Cultural Difference (Duke University Press Books, 2010)

Visweswaran2In Un/common Cultures, Kamala Visweswaran develops an incisive critique of the idea of culture at the heart of anthropology, describing how it lends itself to culturalist assumptions. She holds that the new culturalism—the idea that cultural differences are definitive, and thus divisive—produces a view of “uncommon cultures” defined by relations of conflict rather than forms of collaboration. The essays in Un/common Cultures straddle the line between an analysis of how racism works to form the idea of “uncommon cultures” and a reaffirmation of the possibilities of “common cultures,” those that enact new forms of solidarity in seeking common cause. Such “cultures in common” or “cultures of the common” also produce new intellectual formations that demand different analytic frames for understanding their emergence. By tracking the emergence and circulation of the culture concept in American anthropology and Indian and French sociology, Visweswaran offers an alternative to strictly disciplinary histories. She uses critical race theory to locate the intersection between ethnic/diaspora studies and area studies as a generative site for addressing the formation of culturalist discourses. In so doing, she interprets the work of social scientists and intellectuals such as Elsie Clews Parsons, Alice Fletcher, Franz Boas, Louis Dumont, Claude Lévi-Strauss, Clifford Geertz, W. E. B. Du Bois, and B. R. Ambedkar.

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