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Madeline Y. Hsu, Director BUR 480, Mailcode A2200, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6427

Ramey Ko

Lecturer J.D., University of Chicago Law School

Contact

Biography

Ramey Ko, Appointee for Member, President's Advisory Commission on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

Ramey Ko is currently Associate Judge of the City of Austin Municipal Court.  Before being appointed a judge by the Austin City Council in January 2010, Judge Ko was an attorney at the Texas Advocacy Project, a non-profit organization that provides free legal services to victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking.  Prior to his position with the Texas Advocacy Project, Judge Ko was an Equal Justice Works Fellow with Texas RioGrande Legal Aid, Inc. and focused on direct representation, education, and outreach related to housing issues faced by survivors of domestic violence.  Judge Ko is an Advisory Board Member of the Texas Asian Chamber of Commerce and serves on the City of Austin Public Safety Commission.  Judge Ko holds a B.A. from Yale University and a J.D. from the University of Chicago.

AAS 325 • Asian American Jurisprudence

36040 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm GAR 1.126
(also listed as AMS 321, GOV 357M )
show description

Throughout the history of the United States, the law and the legal system have shaped nearly every facet of Asian American life.  The law can be used to exclude, to empower, and sometimes even to define the very meaning and definition of one’s community and identity.  Apart from the law itself, the court system, as the main forum for the discussion and resolution of legal disputes, has also had tremendous power to influence the lives and experiences of Asian Americans.  Whether it is immigration, national security, or the pursuit of happiness, the law has had and will continue to have a profound impact on the lives of Asian Americans everywhere.

This course will provide a comprehensive introduction to the study of Asian Americans and the law.  Students will examine the historical development of US law and its relationship to Asian Americans, as well as the development of Asian American jurisprudence as an independent field of legal scholarship.  In addition, this course will provide students the tools to think critically about Asian Americans and the law by introducing students to principles of legal reasoning and analysis and the major schools of legal thought.  Topics will include immigration, civil rights, affirmative action, and access to justice.  Students will also learn about the common law system, legal positivism, legal realism, economic analysis of law, and critical race theory.

We will approach this course like a law school class.  The majority of the readings consist of primary source court opinions, and class time will focus on deepening student understanding of the course material through the Socratic method of question and answer.  Grading will be based on participation, five reading quizzes, a midterm, and a final.  Participation will be measured by quality, not quantity; what matters is not whether students can give a “right” or “wrong” answer, but whether student responses demonstrate a familiarity with the reading and a genuine effort to think critically about the subject matter.

Fulfills Ethic and Leadership and Cultural Diversity flags.

GRADING:

10% Participation

15% Reading Quizzes (5) (5 IDs, 25 min)

25% Midterm Exam (IDs and Essays)

50% Final Exam (IDs and Essays)

AAS 325 • Asian American Jurisprudence

35870 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 101
(also listed as AMS 321, GOV 357M )
show description

Throughout the history of the United States, the law and the legal system have shaped nearly every facet of Asian American life.  The law can be used to exclude, to empower, and sometimes even to define the very meaning and definition of one’s community and identity.  Apart from the law itself, the court system, as the main forum for the discussion and resolution of legal disputes, has also had tremendous power to influence the lives and experiences of Asian Americans.  Whether it is immigration, national security, or the pursuit of happiness, the law has had and will continue to have a profound impact on the lives of Asian Americans everywhere.

This course will provide a comprehensive introduction to the study of Asian Americans and the law.  Students will examine the historical development of US law and its relationship to Asian Americans, as well as the development of Asian American jurisprudence as an independent field of legal scholarship.  In addition, this course will provide students the tools to think critically about Asian Americans and the law by introducing students to principles of legal reasoning and analysis and the major schools of legal thought.  Topics will include immigration, civil rights, affirmative action, and access to justice.  Students will also learn about the common law system, legal positivism, legal realism, economic analysis of law, and critical race theory.

We will approach this course like a law school class.  The majority of the readings consist of primary source court opinions, and class time will focus on deepening student understanding of the course material through the Socratic method of question and answer.  Grading will be based on participation, five reading quizzes, a midterm, and a final.  Participation will be measured by quality, not quantity; what matters is not whether students can give a “right” or “wrong” answer, but whether student responses demonstrate a familiarity with the reading and a genuine effort to think critically about the subject matter.

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