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Sharmila Rudrappa, Director BUR 480, Mailcode A2200, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6427

Snehal Shingavi

Assistant Professor Ph.D., 2008, University of California, Berkeley

Snehal Shingavi

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Biography

Snehal Shingavi received his Ph.D. in English from the University of California, Berkeley in 2008 after earning BAs in English and Economics from Trinity University in 1997.  His interests include Anglophone South Asian literature, Hindi/Urdu literature, Literature in Translation and Translation Theory, Theories of “the nation” (anticolonialism, nationalism, statism, postcolonialism, postnationalism, cosmopolitanism, globalization), and Classical Marxism.  He won the Mellon Fellowship in Humanistic Studies, has published articles in several journals including International Socialist Review, and has appeared as a commentator on programs such as Hardball on CNN.

Interests

Anglophone South Asian literature, Hindi/Urdu literature, Literature in Translation and Translation Theory, Theories of “the nation” (anticolonialism, nationalism, statism, postcolonialism, postnationalism, cosmopolitanism, globalization, transnationalism, internationalism), Classical Marxism

AAS 320 • Literature Of Islamophobia

36495 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 105
(also listed as E 360S, ISL 372, R S 346 )
show description

Instructor:  Shingavi, S

Unique #:  36110

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  AAS 320, ISL 372, R S 346

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This class will consider how fiction from the post-9/11 era (widely called the “Global War on Terror”) has produced a particular vision of Islam and Muslims that both reproduces and challenges the ideology of Islamophobia and refines and critiques prior understandings of Muslims. We will be interested in thinking about the deployment of Islam in political rhetoric; depictions of Islam and Muslims in popular culture; debates about Islam that have entered national life in the US; and novelistic representations of Islam over the last decade. We will be particularly interested in understanding how ideas about religion intersect but do not overlap with ideas about race, and how the question of opportunities for Muslim women has become a contemporary preoccupation.

Texts: Readings will include: Edward Said’s Covering Islam; Junaid Rana’s Terrifying Muslims; Afzal-Khan; Updike; Amis; Hamid.

Requirements & Grading: Midterm exam – 25%; Final exam – 30%; Course blog (250 words weekly) – 15%; Short research essays (4, 2 pages each) – 20%; Participation – 10%.

AAS 320 • Global Indian Literature

36010 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 306
(also listed as ANS 361, E 360L )
show description

Instructor:  Shingavi, S            Areas:  V / G

Unique #:  35570            Flags:  Global Cultures

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AAS 320, ANS 361            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Two important historical trends have marked the development and recognition of “Indian literature” as a global (rather than a strictly national) phenomenon. First, the patterns of migration of South Asians since the beginning of the Raj moved Indians to various parts of the British Empire and created a network of ambassadors and webs of affiliation throughout the world for South Asian culture; the fact of colonial schools which produced English-speaking Indians is not incidental. Second, the celebrity of Rushdie as the premiere Indian writer helped to produce a niche market within the publishing world for books about and by South Asians (usually represented by the big, national novel). To this must also be added the contemporary rise of India as a leading world economy which has raised the demand for and curiosity about Indian culture within the global marketplace. This course will investigate the production of a “global Indian literature” – paradoxically cosmopolitan and national – as made up of the intersecting experiences of Indians outside of India and the demands of the literary market (international publishing houses and the big literary prizes). All of the writers that we will consider have won major national and international prizes (the Nobel, Man Booker, Commonwealth Writers, Pulitzer, etc.), and this will allow to think about what kinds of issues, what kinds of histories, and what kinds of forms tend to predominate in this body of writing.

Texts: Tagore, Home and the World; Rushdie, Satanic Verses; Roy, The God of Small Things; Mistry, A Fine Balance; Lahiri, Interpreter of Maladies; Naipaul, A Bend in the River; Chatterjee, The Mammaries of the Welfare State; Ghosh, Sea of Poppies; Seth, Golden Gate; Desai, In Custody.

Requirements & Grading: Weekly blog posts, 250 words (20%); Midterm (20%); Final (30%); Paper, 6-7 pages (20%); Participation (10%).

AAS 320 • Literature Of Islamophobia

36035 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAR 206
(also listed as ANS 361, E 360S, ISL 372 )
show description

Instructor:  Shingavi, S            Areas:  V / G

Unique #:  35550            Flags:  Global cultures

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AAS 320, ANS 361, ISL 372            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This class will consider how fiction from the post-9/11 era (widely called the “Global War on Terror”) has produced a particular vision of Islam and Muslims that both reproduces and challenges the ideology of Islamophobia and refines and critiques prior understandings of Muslims. We will be interested in thinking about the deployment of Islam in political rhetoric; depictions of Islam and Muslims in popular culture; debates about Islam that have entered national life in the US; and novelistic representations of Islam over the last decade.  We will be particularly interested in understanding how ideas about religion intersect but do not overlap with ideas about race, and how the question of opportunities for Muslim women has become a contemporary preoccupation.

Texts: Readings will include: Edward Said’s Covering Islam; Junaid Rana’s Terrifying Muslims; Fawzia Afzal-Khan; John Updike; Martin Amis; Mohsin Hamid.

Requirements & Grading: Midterm exam – 25%; Final exam – 30%; Course blog (250 words weekly) – 15%; Short research essays (4, 2 pages each) – 20%; Participation – 10%.

AAS 320 • Global Indian Literature

35595 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 105
(also listed as ANS 361, E 360L )
show description

Cross-listed with AAS 320; ANS 361

Course Description: Two important historical trends have marked the development and recognition of “Indian literature” as a global (rather than a strictly national) phenomenon. First, the patterns of migration of South Asians since the beginning of the Raj moved Indians to various parts of the British Empire and created a network of ambassadors and webs of affiliation throughout the world for South Asian culture; the fact of colonial schools which produced English-speaking Indians is not incidental. Second, the celebrity of Rushdie as the premiere Indian writer helped to produce a niche market within the publishing world for books about and by South Asians (usually represented by the big, national novel). To this must also be added the contemporary rise of India as a leading world economy which has raised the demand for and curiosity about Indian culture within the global marketplace. This course will investigate the production of a “global Indian literature” – paradoxically cosmopolitan and national – as made up of the intersecting experiences of Indians outside of India and the demands of the literary market (international publishing houses and the big literary prizes). All of the writers that we will consider have won major national and international prizes (the Nobel, Man Booker, Commonwealth Writers, Pulitzer, etc.), and this will allow to think about what kinds of issues, what kinds of histories, and what kinds of forms tend to predominate in this body of writing.

Texts: Tagore, Home and the World; Rushdie, Satanic Verses; Roy, The God of Small Things; Mistry, A Fine Balance; Lahiri, Interpreter of Maladies; Naipaul, A Bend in the River; Chatterjee, The Mammaries of the Welfare State; Ghosh, Sea of Poppies; Seth, Golden Gate; Desai, In Custody.

Grading: Weekly blog posts, 250 words (20%); Midterm (20%); Final (30%); Paper, 6-7 pages (20%); Participation (10%).

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing. 

Publications

Shingavi, S. (2010) Developing the Nationalist Canon. In H. Harder (Ed.), Nationalist Ideology and the Historiography of Literature in South Asia. New Delhi: Social Science Press.

Shingavi, S. & Gasper, P. (2008, September) Palestinian Armed Struggle. Lynne Reiner Publishers.

Shingavi, S. (2007, September) Martin Espada. Facts on File.

Shingavi, S. (2007, September) A Night of Winter Rains. Annual of Urdu Studies, 22, 240-246.

Shingavi, S. (2007, September) A Summer's Evening. Annual of Urdu Studies, 22, 247-252.

Shingavi, S. (2007, September) The Same Trouble. Annual of Urdu Studies, 22, 253-258.

Shingavi, S. (2005) Sevasadan. Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Shingavi, S. (2003, September) Palestine's Lyric Voice for Freedom. International Socialist Review, 30, 58-59.

Shingavi, S. (2008, September) Free Radical: Mulk Raj Anand. India Today, 33(16), 124-126.

Shingavi, S. (2005) Telecom workers fight privatization. In The Great PTCL Strike Against Privatization. Lahore: Shanakht Press.

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