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Sharmila Rudrappa, Director BUR 480, Mailcode A2200, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-9468

Wenhong Chen

Assistant Professor Ph.D., University of Toronto

Wenhong Chen

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Biography

Wenhong Chen is an assistant professor in the Department of Radio-TV-Film, the College of Communication, at the University of Texas at Austin. She earned her PhD in Sociology from the University of Toronto. Before joining the faculty, she was a postdoctoral researcher at Duke University. Her research interests include the social implication of new information and communication technologies, social capital and social networks, and entrepreneurship. Her research has been funded by the Pew Internet and American Life Project, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada, Advanced Micro Devices, and Bell Canada. Among her awards are the IDEA Award (Research Promise Category), Entrepreneurship Division, Academy of Management and the Young Scholar Award of the International Association of Chinese Management Research. Dr. Chen’s work has been published in Journal of Computer Mediated Communication, Information, Communication & Society, Entrepreneurship Theory & Practice, City & Community, and Management and Organization Review. Collaborating with the Pew Internet and American Life Project, she is currently working on a project examining the implications of new communication technologies in the American workplace.

AAS 320 • Media Industrs/Entreprenrs

36265 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm CMA 3.116
(also listed as SOC 352E )
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Flag: Cultural Diversity in the U.S.

Media industries have been challenged by large social forces such as globalization and technological advancements from analog to digital, wired to wireless, and desktop to cloud. Web 2.0 and social media facilitate former members of the audience to actively participate in media production. While legacy media learn to adapt to a new landscape, new media experiment with and search for viable business models and legitimacy. Great challenges bring unprecedented opportunities and risks for organizational innovations, entrepreneurship, and social change.Drawing on literatures from media studies, management, sociology, and communication, this course helps students to develop a critical understanding of the media industries. We start with a survey of the media landscape. In the second part, we examine the social, political, and economic contexts in which media and culture are produced, distributed, and monetized. Special attention is paid to new media and communication technologies such as Web 2.0, social media, gaming, and mobile phone and apps and the implications of these disruptive innovations for media production and consumption. Cases in old and new media industries from different countries will be analyzed. 
 

AAS 320 • Globalization & Social Media

36030 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm CMA A3.116
(also listed as SOC 321K )
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Cross listed with J349T/RTF 331

Course Description

What are social media doing to us? And we to them? Drawing on literatures from media studies, sociology, communication, and management, this course invites students to engage in critical analysis of the causes, patterns, and consequences of using social media in a global context. Building on cases from diverse cultures and nations, the course provides a rich comparative perspective. The course has three components.

*We start with major debates on the role of communication and media technologies in network society, globalization, and transnationalism.

* In the second part, we focus on how macro social forces and institutions such as state and market shape the development of social media and other new communication technologies. We explore how social inequalities and cultural differences affect digital divides.

* In the third part, we investigate how social media and other new technologies have facilitated changes in politics, organizations, networks, as well as media and culture.

Grading

Class Participation 20% (includes mini assignmnet, 10%  and class presentation 10%)

Research practices 30%

Final Project 50% (includes proposal 10%, presentation 20%  and final paper 20%))

 

 

AAS 320 • Globalization & Social Media-W

35845 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm CMA A3.116
(also listed as SOC 321K )
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Course Description

What are social media doing to us? And we to them? Drawing on literatures from media studies, sociology, communication, and management, this course invites students to engage in critical analysis of the causes, patterns, and consequences of using social media in a global context.  Building on cases from diverse cultures and nations, the course provides a rich comparative perspective. The course has three components.

  • We start with major debates on the role of communication and media technologies in network society, globalization, and transnationalism.
  • In the second part, we focus on how macro social forces and institutions such as state and market shape the development of social media and other new communication technologies. We explore how social inequalities and cultural differences affect digital divides.
  • In the third part, we investigate how social media and other new technologies have facilitated changes in politics, organizations, networks, as well as media and culture.

AAS 320 • Globalization & Social Media-W

35600 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 300pm-430pm CMA A3.116
(also listed as SOC 321K )
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What are social media doing to us? And we to them? How do social media such as Facebook and Twitter affect the way we work, play, and connect? How have new communication technologies changed politics, organizations, networks, as well as the production and consumption of culture and media? How do state policy, market competition, social inequalities, and cultural differences shape the digital divides - the uneven access to and use of social media and other new communication technologies?  This course invites students to engage in a critical analysis of the social impacts of social media in the context of globalization. Building on cases from diverse national and ethnic cultures, the course provides a rich cross-cultural and cross-national comparison.

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