Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
caaas masthead
Cherise Smith, Ph.D, Director JES A232A, Mailcode D7200, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-1784

Workshop in African Studies: "Blackboard Equations: Race and Textual Representation in the Classroom"

Fri, September 18, 2009 • 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM • ISESE Gallery (JES A230) - The John L. Warfield Center for African and African American Studies

Dr. Moyo Okediji,  Assistant Professor of Art and Art History, The University of Texas at Austin

"I will raise a discussion around my use of railroad coal in the context of color symbolism in the United States, with specific reference to my mural entitled Remembering. I will explore the tension between the blackboard and the text as a paradigm for representing racial, gender, and sexual relationships that sustain discussions and frame learning within the academic classroom".

Moyo Okediji is an art historian, artist, and curator. He studied fine arts at the University of Ife, before proceeding to the University of Benin, where he did an MFA in African art criticism, poetry, and painting. At the University of Wisconsin, Madison, he received a Ph.D. in African arts and Diaspora visual cultures.  He has apprenticed with several indigenous African artists working in both sacred and secular mediums including mat weaving, textile designs, terra cotta, shrine painting, and sculpture.

After teaching for several years in Nigeria, Okediji relocated to the United States in 1992. For ten years he was the curator of African and Oceanic arts at the Denver Art Museum. he has taught at various colleges in the United States, including Wellesley College, Gettysburg College, university of Wisconsin, Madison, and the University of Colorado at Denver. He has also exhibited at various places including the New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York, The Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC,. the Corcoran Center, London, and the National Museum Gallery, Lagos Nigeria.  he is the author of books and exhibition catalogues including African Renaissance, Old Forms, New Images in Nigerian Art; and The Shattered Gourd: Yoruba Forms in Twentieth Century American Art.

Sponsored by: The John L. Warfield Center for African and African American Studies


Bookmark and Share

bottom border