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Cherise Smith, Ph.D, Director JES A232A, Mailcode D7200, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-1784

Charles Daniel Carson

Assistant Professor Ph. D. in Music History, University of Pennsylvania

Assistant Professor of Music

Contact

  • Phone: +1 512 232 9448
  • Office: Butler School of Music, College of Fine Arts - MRH 3.736
  • Campus Mail Code: E3100

Biography

Charles Carson is a musicologist whose interests are
African-American/American expressive cultures, Popular Music, Jazz,
Film Music, and music and culture. A graduate of the Moores School of
Music at the University of Houston, Charles is a former Howard Mayer
Brown Fellow for the American Musicological Society. He received his
PhD in Music History from the University of Pennsylvania, with a
dissertation entitled "Broad and Market: At the Crossroads of Race and
Class in Philadelphia Jazz, 1956-1980." He has presented and published
in a number of venues, on topics ranging from theme park music to
smooth jazz.

AFR 317 • Music Of African Americans

30583 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MRH 2.634
show description

 

 

AFR 317 • Music Of African Americans

30180 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MRH 2.634
show description

Course Description:

Generally speaking, this course is an introduction to the variety of modes of expression of African American culture in music and other related genres.

II. Course Aims and Objectives:

Aims

Beyond increasing familiarity with African American music and culture, a major goal of this course is to provide you with the tools to coexist--and indeed thrive--in a global context.

Specific Learning Objectives:

By the end of this course, students will: ● Be able to recognize and describe general elements of African American cultural practices, including

instruments/media, performance practice, and aesthetics.

● Discuss the ways in which these elements have influenced (and continue to influence) contemporary American and global cultures.

● Critically assess expressions and representations of African American culture in music and media. ● Be able to apply these critical thinking skills in the context of other cultures, both historical and

contemporary.

III. Format and Procedures:

The primary format for our class meetings will be discussions. These discussions will center around a select body of readings, recordings, videos, and other media, facilitated by reading guides circulated (and completed!) beforehand. Advance preparation is key to avoiding a “dry lecture” format, so please come to class prepared to discuss that day’s materials.

Other activities may include: listening assignments, short quizzes, and concert/performance reviews.IV. My Assumptions

I believe that diversity is good for the world. It opens up our eyes to other perspectives and possibilities, and can thus help move humankind forward. I also believe that the understanding of how identity works in general is key to understanding ourselves. While this course, we will focus upon expressions of African-American identity specifically, but in doing so, I hope that we will foster greater patience, understanding, and respect for any and all peoples.

By enrolling in this class, I assume that you are interested in taking such a journey. While I don’t expect you to agree with everything you learn, I do expect that you will put the utmost effort towards developing an appreciation for African-American culture, as well as an awareness of music’s important role in the enrichment of the human spirit.

AFR F317 • Music Of African Americans

81690 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am MRH 2.634
show description

Generally speaking, this course is an introduction to the variety of modes of expression of African American culture in music and other related genres. Beyond increasing familiarity with African American music and culture, a major goal of this course is to provide you with the tools to coexist--and indeed thrive--in a global context.

By the end of this course, students will:

● Be able to recognize and describe general elements of African American cultural practices, including instruments/media, performance practice, and aesthetics.

● Discuss the ways in which these elements have influenced (and continue to influence) contemporary American and global cultures.

● Critically assess expressions and representations of African American culture in music and media.

● Be able to apply these critical thinking skills in the context of other cultures, both historical and contemporary.

 

My Assumptions:

I believe that diversity is good for the world. It opens up our eyes to other perspectives and possibilities, and can thus help move humankind forward. I also believe that the understanding of how identity works in general is key to understanding ourselves. While this course, we will focus upon expressions of African-American identity specifically, but in doing so, I hope that we will foster greater patience, understanding, and respect for any and all peoples.

By enrolling in this class, I assume that you are interested in taking such a journey. While I don’t expect you to agree with everything you learn, I do expect that you will put the utmost effort towards developing an appreciation for African-American culture, as well as an awareness of music’s important role in the enrichment of the human spirit.

AFR 317 • Music Of African Americans

30380 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MRH 2.634
show description

I. Course Description:

Generally speaking, this course is an introduction to the variety of modes of expression of African American culture in music and other related genres.

II. Course Aims and Objectives:

Aims

Beyond increasing familiarity with African American music and culture, a major goal of this course is to provide you with the tools to coexist-- and indeed thrive--in a global context.

Specific Learning Objectives:

By the end of this course, students will:

● Be able to recognize and describe general elements of African American cultural practices, including instruments/media, performance practice, and aesthetics.

● Discuss the ways in which these elements have influenced (and continue to influence) contemporary American and global cultures.

● Critically assess expressions and representations of African American culture in music and media.

● Be able to apply these critical thinking skills in the context of other cultures, both historical and contemporary.

AFR 387D • Reading Black Music History

30610 • Spring 2012
Meets M 200pm-500pm MRH 3.134
show description

The goal of this seminar is to introduce the broad field of Black Music Research--its history, issues, methodologies--through close readings of foundational texts and their related repertoires. This subject is inherently interdisciplinary, and as such this course will draw connections between numerous fields, including Musicology/Ethnomusicology, History, Sociology, American Studies, English and Literature, Women and Gender Studies, and of course African and African-American Studies. While the focus will primarily be upon African-American music, the discussions will situate this music within the larger contexts of both American society and the African Diaspora. In this way, we may be able to explore larger historiographical issues that can be applied to other areas of research."

 

We will mostly be reading music-centered stuff, but I do plan to throw in some essential readings in black studies (DuBois, Baraka, Asante, Gates, Gilroy, etc.). A background in music is generally not necessary (we won't really be looking at musical scores), though some of the readings will use field-specific terminology.

AFR 317 • Music Of African Americans

30145 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MRH 2.634
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AFR 317 • Music Of African Americans

30410 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MRH 2.634
show description

 

 

AFR 317 • Music Of African Americans

35240 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MRH 2.634
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