Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
caaas masthead
Cherise Smith, Ph.D, Director JES A232A, Mailcode D7200, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-1784

Fehintola (Tola) Mosadomi

Assistant Professor Ph.D., 1998, Interdisciplinary Linguistics and Yoruba Phonology, Tulane University

Assistant Professor of Middle Eastern Studies and of African and African Diaspora Studies
Fehintola (Tola) Mosadomi

Contact

Biography

Fehintola Mosadomi holds a Ph.D. from Tulane University with a specialization in Yoruba Phonology. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Middle Eastern studies and an affiliate of the John L. Warfield Center for African and African American Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. She is a poet and linguist. Dr. Mosadomi’s interests include poetry, language pedagogy, language and power, language and gender, feminist studies, African linguistics, semantics, and Francophone studies.

Interests

African languages and linguistics; Creole studies; language pedagogy; gender studies; theoretical and applied linguistics

YOR 601C • Beginning Yoruba

30765 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 1100am-1230pm PAR 304
show description

An intensive beginning course with an emphasis on basic skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Together, YOR 601C and YOR 611C (the latter of which will be taught in Spring 2015) fulfill the College of Liberal Arts foreign language requirement.

AFR 372G • Gndr In North & West Africa

30725 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 1.206
(also listed as MEL 321, MES 342, WGS 340 )
show description

The course seeks to develop in students an understanding and appreciation of African gender theories through an examination of the variables between the realities of African gender perspectives and current gender theories. Students should engage in effective and meaningful dialogue that not only affects Africa but also the West, thus increasing an awareness in cross-cultural gender issues.

Texts

Akinwumi Isola. Efu nseta n Ani wu ra, Iya lo de Ibadan and Tinu ubu ,Iya lo de Egba : Two Yoruba  Historical Dramas. Trans. Pamela Olubunmi Smith. Trenton, N.J.: Africa World Press Inc., 2005. - Ba , Mariama. So Long a Letter. Trans. Modupe Bode-Thomas. London and Nairobi: Heinemann, 1981. - Djebar, Assia. Fantasia: An Algerian Calvacade. Trans. Dorothy Blair. London: Quartet Books, 1989. Trans of L'Amour, la fantasia. -Oyo no-Mbia, Guillaume. "Three Suitors, One Husband" in Faces of African Independence: Three Plays. Charlottesville, 1988.

Grading

Attendance and Participation: 10% Individual Term Paper 40% Individual Oral Presentation 15% Group Term Paper 20% Group Oral Presentation 15%

YOR 507 • First-Year Yoruba II

30995 • Spring 2014
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-200pm PAR 308
show description

One of the three main languages of Nigeria, Yoruba accounts for about 20 million speakers of the language in Southwestern Nigeria alone as we as another 15 million beyond the immediate Yorubaland, including Nigerian neighbors such as the Republic of Benin and Togo as well as in Haiti, Trinidad, Cuba, Brazil, among other diaspora nations where Yoruba is used in ritual and sacred rites.  This course focuses on the spoken standard Yoruba language as used in contemporary Nigeria. Students will acquire all four skills in language instruction: speaking, listening, reading, and writing.  In addition, students will be exposed to several cultural issues and values as they are gradually immersed into the Yoruba world and culture through language and other multimedia.

AFR 317C • Peoples And Cultures Of Africa

30250 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm PAR 303
show description

Description:

This course, a selection of indigenous and contemporary societies of Africa south of the Sahara, is designed to provide students with an understanding of the diversity of the societies and cultures of Africa, focusing on the pre-colonial, colonial, and post colonial historical, political, economic, and socio-cultural issues that have determined and shaped the lives of the people. Emphasis is placed on themes of religion, gender, family structures, cultural institutions, marriage, kinship, and oral traditions.  Through readings, films, documentaries, and video interviews, we will examine the images of Africa, from the perspectives of Africans and the West, as well as continuity and change in traditions of the African people.

Texts to include:

Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart. London: Heinemann, 1958

Achebe, Chinua. A Man of the People. New York: Doubleday, 1966

Ba, Mariama. So long a Letter. Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1989

Oyono-Mbia, Guillaume. Three Suitors, One Husband.  London: Methuen, 1968

Smith, Pamela.  Efunsetan, Aniwura, Iyalode Ibadan, and Tinuubu, Iyalode Egba: Two Historical Dramas.  Trenton, New Jersey: Africa  World Press, Inc., 2005

Grading breakdown (percentages):

 Attendance and Participation:             10%    

 Mid-Term Exam:                                30%    

Group Term Paper:                              40%    

Group Oral Presentation:                     20%

AFR 317C • Yoruba Women

30255 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm PAR 301
(also listed as WGS 301 )
show description

Course Description:

In the past couple of decades, African women’s/ gender studies have increasingly becomea focus of inquiry in many spheres--- socio-economic, political, religious, and cultural.However, Western feminist and womanist perspectives and theoretical frameworks havedominated the studies and analyses of African women’s lives. This course, whichfocuses on Yorùbá women, will examine gender construction in Yorùbáland and furtherexplore the differences between Western gender construction and African notions ofgender. For many centuries before colonization, the Yorùbá of southwestern Nigeria hada history of statehood supported by different categories of power--- military, religious,and political. By analyzing the religious, linguistic, and socio-political aspects of cultural,and socio-political aspects of Yorùbá life, the course will shed light on gender relations inYorubaland and revisit the construction- -African/Yoruba womanhood in extantscholarship.

Course Objective:

The course seeks to develop in students an understanding andappreciation of African gender theories through an examination of the variables betweenthe realities of African gender perspectives and current gender theories. Students willengage in effective and meaningful dialogue that not only affects Africa but also theWest, thus increasing an awareness in cross-cultural gender issues.

Required Texts: All readings in course packet are required

****(Reading) Course Packets: Available at the UT Copy Center, TX Union,Room 2.214, 2247 Guadalupe Phone: 475-6675Akinwumi Isola. Efúnsetán Aníwúrà, Ìyálóde Ègbá: Two Yorùbá Historical Dramas.Translated from the Yorùbá. Pamela Olubunmi Smith, translator. Trenton, N.J.:Africa World Press Inc., 2005.

Cheryl Johnson-Odim and Nina Emma Mba. For Women and the Nation:Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti of Nigeria, Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1997.

Grading Policy:

Attendance and Participation: 10%

Assigned Readings (with brief summary and reactions) 10%

Individual Term Paper 25%

Individual Oral Presentation 15%

Group Term Paper 25%

Group Oral Presentation 15%

A = 94-100A- = 90-93B+ = 88-89B = 85-87B- = 80-84C+ = 78-79C = 75-77C- = 70-74D+ = 68-69D = 65-67D- = 60-64F = 59-0

Individual Term Paper

There will be a mid-semester term paper of 5 to 7 pages (minus bibliography). A topic will beassigned by the professor. If you have difficulties researching and writing, see me or go to thewriting center as soon as possible for help.

Group Term PaperThere will be an end of semester term paper of 10 to 12 pages (minus bibliography). No lateterm papers will be accepted. Students will be placed in groups and a topic will be assigned toeach group by the professor.

All term papers (group and individual) should be turned in to me in class only.

Assigned Readings

Required readings will be assigned to each student throughout the semester. These assignedreadings (with a brief summary of about 2-3pages typed written to be turned in on the day ofpresentation) get all students engaged.

Oral Presentation:

In the middle of the semester, there will be an individual oral presentation of each student’sfinal term paper. At the end of the semester, there will be an oral presentation of group termpapers. Oral presentation, like the term paper, should be structured: introduction, body, andconclusion. No YouTube presentations. You need permission from the professor if you will usetechnology for presentation of your work, which means—come to class early to prepare the useof the consul.-No student shall read from his or her paper. Prepare to use flashcards or speak spontaneously.

Video:Films / documentaries will be watched in class, followed by discussions.

YOR 507 • First-Year Yoruba II

30585 • Spring 2013
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-200pm PAR 308
show description

One of the three main languages of Nigeria, Yoruba accounts for about 20 million speakers of the language in Southwestern Nigeria alone as we as another 15 million beyond the immediate Yorubaland, including Nigerian neighbors such as the Republic of Benin and Togo as well as in Haiti, Trinidad, Cuba, Brazil, among other diaspora nations where Yoruba is used in ritual and sacred rites.  This course focuses on the spoken standard Yoruba language as used in contemporary Nigeria. Students will acquire all four skills in language instruction: speaking, listening, reading, and writing.  In addition, students will be exposed to several cultural issues and values as they are gradually immersed into the Yoruba world and culture through language and other multimedia.

AFR 317C • Yoruba Women

30185 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 101
(also listed as WGS 301 )
show description

In the last two to three decades, African Gender Studies, as a focus of inquiry, have dominated socio-political, religious, moral, and academic discourses inside and outside of Africa. In the realm of African gender studies, the theory of African feminism is grounded in African historical and cultural experience in the sense that it highlights the African woman’s needs, hopes, and desires, and therefore, the terms ‘Africana Womanism’ or ‘African Womanism’.However, Western-based feminist theoretical concepts and analytical perspectives, including the womanist theory in the African Diaspora, have often been applied to most available body of works. If gender is a social construction, how applicable are Western concepts of gender to gender issues in Africa, and how valid are such concepts? These questions form the basic arguments for this course in which Yoruba women will be the focus of discussion.  The Yoruba of Nigeria, West Africa, have for the past five centuries a history of organized statehood, military, and political power before the European scramble for Africa, which was followed by re-organization of African peoples, cultures, and state boundaries for the purposes of colonization. Within this historical context, the course will explore the gender construction in Yoruba land. Also, through the analyses of religious, linguistic, and socio-political discourse and practices among the Yoruba, the course will also examine the variables between the realities of African gender perspectives and current gender theories.

YOR 507 • First-Year Yoruba II

30665 • Spring 2012
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-200pm PAR 308
show description

One of the three main languages of Nigeria, Yoruba accounts for about 20 million speakers of the language in Southwestern Nigeria alone as we as another 15 million beyond the immediate Yorubaland, including Nigerian neighbors such as the Republic of Benin and Togo as well as in Haiti, Trinidad, Cuba, Brazil, among other diaspora nations where Yoruba is used in ritual and sacred rites.  This course focuses on the spoken standard Yoruba language as used in contemporary Nigeria. Students will acquire all four skills in language instruction: speaking, listening, reading, and writing.  In addition, students will be exposed to several cultural issues and values as they are gradually immersed into the Yoruba world and culture through language and other multimedia.

AFR 317C • Yoruba Women

30150 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 101
(also listed as WGS 301 )
show description

In the last two to three decades, African Gender Studies, as a focus of inquiry, have dominated socio-political, religious, moral, and academic discourses inside and outside of Africa. In the realm of African gender studies, the theory of African feminism is grounded in African historical and cultural experience in the sense that it highlights the African woman’s needs, hopes, and desires, and therefore, the terms ‘Africana Womanism’ or ‘African Womanism’.However, Western-based feminist theoretical concepts and analytical perspectives, including the womanist theory in the African Diaspora, have often been applied to most available body of works. If gender is a social construction, how applicable are Western concepts of gender to gender issues in Africa, and how valid are such concepts? These questions form the basic arguments for this course in which Yoruba women will be the focus of discussion.  The Yoruba of Nigeria, West Africa, have for the past five centuries a history of organized statehood, military, and political power before the European scramble for Africa, which was followed by re-organization of African peoples, cultures, and state boundaries for the purposes of colonization. Within this historical context, the course will explore the gender construction in Yoruba land. Also, through the analyses of religious, linguistic, and socio-political discourse and practices among the Yoruba, the course will also examine the variables between the realities of African gender perspectives and current gender theories.

YOR 506 • First-Year Yoruba I

30425 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm MEZ B0.302
show description
First-Year Yoruba I

AFR S374C • African Film

81570 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm PAR 301
(also listed as WGS S340 )
show description

African Cinema provides an alternative route to our knowledge of francophone and anglophone Africa. It also provides a medium of engendering or fostering discussion among students, artists, teachers, scholars, film directors, audiences, and film critics, thus enriching and (re)defining our thoughts and ideologies both on traditional and modern Africa. The course will examine the roles played by the rest of the world in the political and economic production of films in Africa, and allow students to increase awareness and engage in effective, meaningful dialogue on religion, education, politics, socio-economics, gender relationships and gender representations, traditional values, the role and status of women in the society, and moral issues that pertain not only to Africa but also to the West.  Attention will be paid to issues concerning film making practices in Africa.

YOR 507 • First-Year Yoruba II

30665 • Spring 2011
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-200pm PAR 308
show description

One of the three main languages of Nigeria, Yoruba accounts for about 20 million speakers of the language in Southwestern Nigeria alone as we as another 15 million beyond the immediate Yorubaland, including Nigerian neighbors such as the Republic of Benin and Togo as well as in Haiti, Trinidad, Cuba, Brazil, among other diaspora nations where Yoruba is used in ritual and sacred rites.  This course focuses on the spoken standard Yoruba language as used in contemporary Nigeria. Students will acquire all four skills in language instruction: speaking, listening, reading, and writing.  In addition, students will be exposed to several cultural issues and values as they are gradually immersed into the Yoruba world and culture through language and other multimedia.

AFR 317C • Yoruba Women

35245 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 101
(also listed as WGS 301 )
show description

AFR 317C YORUBA WOMEN

In the last two to three decades, African Gender Studies, as a focus of inquiry, have dominated socio-political, religious, moral, and academic discourses inside and outside of Africa. African Gender Studies are grounded in the theory of African Feminism which highlights the needs, hopes and desires of African women. This approach to African Feminism has best been labeled African Womanism.

Western-based feminist theoretical concepts and analytical perspectives have typically excluded the realties of African women. If gender is a social construction, how applicable are Western concepts of gender to gender issues in Africa, and how valid are such concepts? These questions form the basic arguments for this course in which Yoruba women will be the focus of discussion.  The Yoruba of Nigeria, West Africa, have a history of organized statehood, and military and political power that predates colonization. While considering this historical context and integrating contemporary perspectives, the course will explore the gender construction in Yoruba-land. Through the analysis of religion, linguistic structure and socio-political discourse, the course will examine the realities of African gender perspectives and current gender theories.

 

Possible Texts and Readings:

Nnaemeka, Obioma.  Sisterhood: Feminisms and Power. New Jersey: Africa World Press Inc., 1998.

 

Ogundipe-Leslie. Re-Creating Ourselves: African Women and Critical Transformation. New Jersey: African World Press Inc., 1994.

 

Olajubu, Oyeronke. Women in the Yoruba Religious Sphere. Albany: State University of New York University Press, 2003.

 

Oyewumi, O. The Invention of Women. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1999.

 

Smith, Pamela. Efunsetan Aniwura and Olu Omo Tinuubu. New Jersey: Africa World Press Inc., 2005


 

YOR 506 • First-Year Yoruba I

35495 • Fall 2010
Meets MTWTHF 300pm-400pm PAR 308
show description

STANDARD YORUBA OF SOUTHWEST NIGERIA

YOR 506 • First-Year Yoruba I

35915 • Fall 2009
Meets MTWTHF 300pm-400pm PAR 308
show description

 

FIRST YEAR YORUBA I

 

Fall Semester 2009

 

 

Course Number: YOR 506    (35915)                       

Meeting: M-F   3-4pm PAR 308

Professor: Dr. Tola Mosadomi

Office: WMB 5.120B                       

Office Hours: M W 2-3pm, and by appointment

E-mail: mosadom@mail.utexas.edu

 

Course Description:

Yoruba is spoken along the West African coast of Africa in countries such as Nigeria, The Republic of Benin, Togo, and the Ivory Coast. It is used for religious purposes in Cuba and Brazil. One of three major languages spoken in south western Nigeria, Yoruba is spoken by over 20 million people.

 

 

Course Objective:

This course seeks to develop students' proficiency in Yoruba in the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By studying a language, we understand the culture in which the language is spoken. Therefore, the history and culture of the Yoruba people will be structured into the program. There will be tone practice in every class.  Most writing exercises will be graded (all essays will be graded). Audio-visual materials will help in developing the four basic language skills. Active participation by individuals and in groups will help students develop their potential. Exercises will be assigned in class. By the end of the course, students will be expected to have mastered the following:

 

  • simple classroom instructions
  • comprehension of simple questions and ability to respond to such questions on familiar topics
  • short and simple basic conversations
  • correct spelling of words
  • writing of short paragraphs, describing
  • basic simple explanations
  • grammar and pronunciation of main topics taught
  • reasonable use of tones

 

Required Materials:

 

Mosadomi, Fehintola. Yorùbá Yemi. (YY)  Handouts/Course Packet--- Available at the UT Copy Center, TX Union, Room 2.214, 2247 Guadalupe. Phone: 475-6675

 

 

A Dictionary of the Yoruba Language, Ibadan: University Press Limited.

 

 

 

 

Course Outline:

 

                       

                                                WEEK 1

 

Wed    Aug 26            Introduction to course

Self Introduction

Introductory Greetings

 

Reading:Yorùbá Yemi

Exercises: Read online on the Yoruba people and Yoruba language                                          

 

 

Thu Aug 27                 Yoruba in Nigeria

Yoruba as Language and Culture

 

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yemi  (Map of Africa / Map of Yorubaland)

Exercises

 

 

Fri Aug 28                   Yoruba as Language and Culture

Yoruba in the Diaspora

ReadingThe Yoruba Diaspora in the Atlantic World. Eds. Toyin Falola and Matt D. Childs

 

WEEK 2

 

Mon Aug 31               Yoruba in the Diaspora

ReadingThe Yoruba Diaspora in the Atlantic World. Eds. Toyin Falola and Matt D. Childs

 

 

 

Tue Sep 1                   Yoruba Alphabets

                        Consonants

                        Vowels

                        Tone Practice

 

 Reading: Yorùbá Yémi Introduction pp 1-19

Exercises:

 

 

Wed Sep 2                  Consonants

Vowels

                                    Tone Practice

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi  Introduction pp 1-19

Exercises:

 

 

Thu Sep 3                   Nasal and Nasalized Vowels

Tones

                                    The syllabic nasals

                                    Tone Practice

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi  pp. 20-22

Exercises:

 

Fri Sep 4                     Nasal and Nasalized Vowels

Tones

                                    The syllabic nasals

                                                            Tone Practice

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi Reading: Yorùbá Yémi  pp. 20-22

Exercises:

 

 

WEEK 3

 

           

Mon Sep 7                  Labor Day Holiday   

             

 

Tue Sep 8                   Greetings (Ch 1)

                                    Tone Practice

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi pp. 25-30

Exercises:

 

 

Wed Sep 9                  Greetings

                                                            Tone Practice

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi pp. 25-30

Exercises:

 

Thu Sep 10                 Titles in Yorùbá

Classroom Expressions

                                    Tone Practice

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi pp. 23-25

Exercises:

 

Fri Sep 11                   Review of Classroom Expressions        

Yorùbá name

Pick a Yorùbá name

Subject Pronouns

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi pp. 23-25

HW1***** Exercises: YY pp. 27-28, exs 1, 2, 3, and  4  due in class today

 

 

WEEK 4        

 

Mon Sep 14                Subject Pronouns + Verbs

Honorific Pronouns

                                    Tone Practice

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi pp 31-34

Exercises

 

Tue Sep 15                 QUIZ 1

 

 

 

Wed    Sep 16             Subject Pronouns

Progressive Marker + '?' + Verbs

                                    Tone Practice

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi pp 31-34

Exercises: YY pp. 33-34,  exs 1, 2, and  3

 

 

Thu      Sep 17             Subject Pronouns

Progressive Marker + '?' + Verbs

                                    Tone Practice

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi

Exercises: YY pp 31-34;  p 34,  exs 4 and  5

 

 

             

Fri       Sep 18             Interrogatives 'Kí ni' and »é

                                    Tone Practice

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi pp 35-36

Exercises: YY pp 35-36, exs. 1-5

                                   

 

WEEK 5

 

 

Mon    Sep 21             More Verbs

                                                            Tone Practice

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi pp 37-38

Exercises: YY pp. 38-39, ex 1, and more handout exs.

HW2***** Exercises: YY pp. 33-34, exs 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 due in class today

 

 

Tue      Sep 22             Verbs + Negation  kò

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi pp 38-39

Exercises: pp. 38-39, ex 1

 

 

Wed    Sep 23             Classroom Objects (Ch 2)

                                    Interrogative Kí ni' + Classroom Objects

Tone Practice

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi pp 42-43

Exercises:

 

 

Thu      Sep 24             Prepositions

                                                            Interrogatives 'Níbo'

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi

Exercises:  pp. 44-47, exs 1, 2, and 3

 

 

 

Fri       Sep 25             Review of Subject Pronouns

                                                            Possessive Pronouns

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi

Exercises: YY   p. 48-50, exs. 1, 2, and 3

           

 

 

WEEK 6

 

Mon Sep 28                Numbers 0-40 

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi pp. 51-54

Exercises: pp. 51-52, exs. 1 and 2    

                                                           

 

 

Tue Sep 29                 Numbers 0-40 

                                                            Dialogue

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi pp. 51-54

Exercises: pp. 52-54, exs. 3 and 4    

HW3*****Exercises: YY pp. 46-47, exs 1, 2, and 3; and pp. 49-50, exs 1, 2, and 3  due in class today

 

 

Wed Sep 30                QUIZ 2

 

 

Thu Oct 1                    Plural Marker 'Àwo?n'

                                                            Tone Practice

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi p. 55-56

Exercises:

 

Fri Oct 2                     The Family (Ch 3)

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi pp. 58-60

Exercises: pp. 59-60 exs 1, 2, and 3 

 

 

WEEK 7

 

 

Mon Oct 5                  The Family

                                                            Polygamy in Yorubaland

 

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi

Exercises: YY  pp. 60-61, exs. 4, 5, and 6  

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi

 

 

 

Tue Oct 6                    The Verbs  Jê  and   Ni

                                                Negation and Kì í «e

 

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi pp. 62-64

Exercises:  pp. 62-63, exs 1 and 2

HW4****Exercises  YY  pp. 51-53, exs 1, 2, 3, 4;  pp. 59-60, exs 1, 2, 3, and 4  due in class today

 

                       

Wed Oct 7                  Monologue                  

 

                                                                       

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi pp. 64-65

Exercises: pp. 64-66 exs. 3, 4, and 5

 

 

Thu Oct 8                    Family in Yorubaland

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi

Exercises: p 67-68, exs. 6 and 7

 

           

Fri Oct 9                     Essay in Class on 'My Family'                    

******HW 5(In-class assignment)   Bring your dictionaries

 

 

WEEK 8

Mon Oct 12                Describing People

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi, pp. 69-71

Exercises: p 67-68, exs. 6 and 7

 

 

Tue Oct 13                  QUIZ 3

 

                                                           

Wed Oct 14                Interrogative 'Tani'      

                                                Àpônlé

                                                            Tone Practice

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi, pp. 72-73

Exercises: YY p. 72-73 ex 1; pp. 75-76

******HW 6 Exercises, YY pp.  62-63, exs 1 and 2, pp. 64-67 exs. 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7

due in class today

 

 

Thu Oct 15                  Numbers 40-100 (Ch 4)

                                                Eélòó

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi, pp. 77-78

Exercises: YY pp. 78-79, exs 1, 2, and 3

 

 

            Fri Oct 16                   The Yoruba Calendar  

                                                Days of the Week

                                                Months of the Year

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi, pp. 79-81

Exercises: pp. 80-81, exs. 1, 2, 3, and 4

 

 

 

WEEK 9

 

Mon Oct 19                The Yoruba Calendar  

                                                Days of the Week

                                                Months of the Year

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi, p. 80-81

Exercises: pp. 80-81, exs. 1, 2, 3, and 4

 

 

 

Tue Oct 20                  Future Tense   Máa

                                                Máa + Yoruba Calendar

 

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi, pp. 80-81; pp. 82-83

Exercises: YY, pp 80-81 exs. 1, 2, 3, and 4

******HW 7 Exercises, YY pp. 78-79, exs 1, 2, 3, and 4;   pp. 80-81, exs 1, 2, 3,  and 4 due in class today      

 

 

 

Wed Oct 21                Máa + Yoruba Calendar

                                                            Mélòó + Asking your age

                                                Tone Practice

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi, pp. 83-86

Exercises: YY, p 83, exs. 1 and 2, p 85 ex 1

 

                                                           

                                   

Thu Oct 22                  Cardinals

                                                Mélòó contnd

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi, pp. 87-90 

Exercises: YY, p 88 ex 1, p 89-90 exs 2 and 3   

 

 

Fri Oct 23                   Time (Ch 5)

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi, pp. 91-94 

Exercises: YY, pp 92-93 exs 1 and 2, p 92 ex 2,  and p 94 exs 3 and 4   

 

 

WEEK 10

 

Mon Oct 26                Time

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi, pp. 95-98 

Exercises: YY, pp 95-98 exs 5, 6, 7, and 8   

 

 

 

                        Tue Oct 27                  Telling your age

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi, pp. 99-101 

Exercises: YY, pp 99-101 exs 1, 2, and 3   

 

 

Wed Oct 28                QUIZ 4

 

 

 

Thu Oct 29                  Colors

                                    Ordinals

 

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi, pp. 102-107 

Exercises: YY, p103 ex 1, p 104 ex 2   

******HW 8 Exercises, YY p 83 exs 1 and 2,  p 85 ex 1;  p 88 ex 1,  pp. 89-90, exs  2 and 3  due in class today

 

 

Fri Oct 30                   Food (Ch 6)                

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi, pp. 108-113 

Exercises: YY, p 112 ex 1, pp 113-114 ex 2   

 

 

 

WEEK 11

 

Mon Nov 2                 Food

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi, pp. 115-117 

Exercises: YY, p 115-116 exs 1, 2, 3, and 4    

 

 

Tue Nov 3                   Ordering Food

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi, 118-119 

Exercises: YY, p 119 ex 1    

 

 

Wed Nov 4                 Numbers 100-3000 (Ch 7)

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi, pp. 121-122            

Exercises: YY pp. 120-121 exs 1, 2, and 3   

 

                                               

Thu Nov 5                   Video/Haggling         

                                                            Oní/Alá/¿lê

                                    Haggling in the market

           

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi, pp 123-129                         

Exercises: YY, pp 123-124 ex 1, pp 125-129 exs 4, 5, 6 and 7   

 

 

Fri Nov 6                    Haggling in the market

 

           

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi, pp 126-131   

Exercises: YY pp 130 exs 8 and 9   

 

WEEK 12                  

Mon Nov 9                 Health and Illness (Ch 8)

                                    Parts of the body

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi, pp. 133-139 

Exercises: YY, p 140 ex 1   

 

 

 

 

 

Tue Nov 10                Parts of the body       

                                                What you do with parts of the body

   

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi, pp. 139-140 

Exercises: YY,  p 140 ex 1   

 

 

 

Wed Nov 11               QUIZ 5

 

 

Thu Nov 12    In-Class Essay

****HW 9 (In-class assignment)      Bring your dictionary

 

Fri Nov 13                  Health and Illness (part 2)

                                    Vowel Elision

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi, pp. 141-143 

Exercises: YY,  p 140 ex 1, p 141 ex 2   

 

 

                                                            WEEK 13

 

Mon Nov 16               Dialogue

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi, pp. 145-146 

Exercises: YY,  p 145-146 exs 1 and 2

*******HW 10 YY, p 112 ex 1, pp 113-114 ex 2;  p 115-116 exs 1, 2, 3, and 4;    

 p 119 ex 1;      pp. 120-121 exs 1, 2, and 3;

 

Tue Nov 17                 Traditional Professions (Ch 9)

 

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi, pp. 150-151 

Exercises: YY,  p 151-152 ex 2, p 153 ex 3   

 

 

Wed Nov 18               Possessive / Emphatic Pronouns

                                    Modern Professions

           

Reading: Yorùbá Yémi, pp. 151-153 

Exercises: YY,  p 153 ex 3, p 155 ex 4   

             

                        Thu Nov 19                 VIDEO

 

 

Fri Nov 20                  ORALS

           

                                   

 

 

WEEK 14

 

Mon Nov 23               ORALS

 

*******HW 11 YY, pp. 120-121 exs 1, 2, and 3; pp 123-124 ex 1, pp 125-129 exs 4, 5, 6 and 7 ;  pp 130 exs 8 and 9;  p 136 ex 1, p 140 ex 1, p 141 ex 2       

 

 

Tue Nov 24                 QUIZ 6

 

 

Wed Nov 25               VIDEO

 

 

Thu Nov 26 -Sun Nov 29   THANKSGIVING  HOLIDAY  

 

 

 

                                                WEEK 15

 

Mon Nov 30-Fri Dec 4       PROJECT PRESENTATIONS

 

 

Fri Dec 4                               LAST DAY OF CLASS

 

 

 

DEC ?                                    FINAL EXAM

 

Grading Policy:

 

Attendance and Participation:                                                 10%                                        

Homework and In-class Assignments                                     20%                               6Quizzes                                                                                         25%

Technology Project                                                                            15%

Oral exam                                                                                         10%

Final Exam                                                                                        20%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Score average         Letter grade

 

A         =          94-100

A-        =          90-93

B+       =          88-89

B          =          85-87

B-        =          80-84

C+       =         78-79

C         =          75-77

C-        =          70-74

D+       =          68-69

D         =          65-67

D-        =          60-64

F          =          59-0

 

 

NO INCOMPLETES OF ANY KIND WILL BE GIVEN IN THIS COURSE

 

Assignments will consist of regular grammar exercises, occasional (in-class or out-of-class) short simple essays. Exercises we did in class can be tested on quizzes and exams even when they have not been assigned as written exercises.  At other times, in-class assignments (work to be done in the classroom) will be given at any time in class without prior notice.   Preparation of work for the day will facilitate comprehension of text, and more particularly, in-class assignments. For in-class Yorùbá essay, the use of a dictionary is strongly encouraged just as it is for all home assignments. No late homework will be accepted. No make up assignments, no incompletes. There are eleven homework assignments. Students can drop one assignment with the lowest grade.

 

 

 Quizzes will comprise all materials taught prior to quiz day.  Quizzes will be 40 minutes long. There will be short oral components integrated into the quizzes. No make up quizzes. No incompletes.

 

Oral Exam is based on all materials learned in class. It is strictly verbal. It can comprise   group skits or individual interviews. More information will be provided on this as the semester progresses.

 

A Final Exam will be given at the end of the semester. More information will be provided on this later in the semester. There will be short oral components integrated into the final exam.  No incompletes.   It is, therefore, advisable to speak Yorùbá in class. Anyone late to class will not be granted extra time or allowed any make up any quiz or exam in or outside of class.

 

Attendance:

With 4 tardies, your overall (final) grade reduces by 5 points. With 5 tardies, you lose 10 points of your overall final grade. With more than 5 tardies, 20 points will be deducted from your final grade. This may eventually earn you an 'F'. Tardiness means any minute past the start of class.  No extra minutes will be allowed for any in-class work ( tests, essays, project presentations, exams...). In short, tardiness is discouraged.

 

With 4 absences (i.e. one more absence beyond the 3 excused absences), you lose 10 points of your overall grade. You are allowed 3 absences (including illnesses or any other excuse) without penalties.

 

With 5 absences, which include the 3 allowed excuses (plus illnesses and other excuses), you automatically earn an 'F'. Excessive absence policy overrides the grading policy. For example, if you earned an 'A' overall and you were excessively absent(absent beyond 4 times), you automatically earn an 'F'.

 

Accommodations: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-62598, 471-6441 TTY

 

Video

Some days are video days. Students will watch a film/documentary. Videos are used to supplement knowledge on Yorùbá language and culture.  More information will be provided on this in class.

 

Technology Projects/Oral Presentation: 

There will be a technology project presentation at the end of the semester. The professor will assign each student a topic.

 

-Oral presentation, like the term paper, should be structured: introduction, body, and conclusion. The duration of oral presentation is ? minutes maximum. There will be a penalty: 10-20 points deducted (the professor will decide on this and will inform the student of the decision) if the student particularly exceeds the number of minutes.

- Prepare to use flashcards or speak spontaneously.

-- Plan your projects ahead of time.

 

 

Plagiarism:

-No student shall share his or her work with any other student. Avoid instances of plagiarism which will have grave consequences. See University regulations on plagiarism:

Policy on Scholastic Dishonesty:

Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced. For further information please visit the Student Judicial Services Web site: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs

 

I AM AVAILAIBLE FOR HELP ON QUIZZES, ESSAY WRITING, EXAMS, AND PROJECT PRESENTATIONS

 

CLASSROOM POLICY

 

The course syllabus can be amended if necessary as the semester progresses.

 

Participation and Preparation

Bring your textbook to class everyday. You will not be allowed to share someone else's book, and this can be devastating in times of essay writing, in-class assignments, etc.

 

Turn off cell phones: There will be no use of cell phones whatsoever in this class: no text messaging, no receiving or making calls: 25 points will be deducted from the final grade of any student who breaks this rule. There can also be grave consequences, such as being dropped from the course.   Any distraction or disruption of class will have serious consequences: 20 points or more will be deducted from final grade.

 

 

Responsibilities: Students must read assignments before coming to class, and prepare for class discussion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

YOR 507 • First-Year Yoruba II

35140 • Spring 2009
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-200pm PAR 308
show description

One of the three main languages of Nigeria, Yoruba accounts for about 20 million speakers of the language in Southwestern Nigeria alone as we as another 15 million beyond the immediate Yorubaland, including Nigerian neighbors such as the Republic of Benin and Togo as well as in Haiti, Trinidad, Cuba, Brazil, among other diaspora nations where Yoruba is used in ritual and sacred rites.  This course focuses on the spoken standard Yoruba language as used in contemporary Nigeria. Students will acquire all four skills in language instruction: speaking, listening, reading, and writing.  In addition, students will be exposed to several cultural issues and values as they are gradually immersed into the Yoruba world and culture through language and other multimedia.

bottom border