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Cherise Smith, Ph.D, Director JES A232A, Mailcode D7200, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-1784

Edmund T. Gordon

Associate Professor Ph. D., Stanford University

Associate Professor of African and African Diaspora Studies, Chair of AADS Department
Edmund T. Gordon

Contact

Biography

Edmund T. Gordon is chair of the African and African Diaspora Studies Department and Associate Professor African and African Diaspora Studies and Anthropology of the African Diaspora at The University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Gordon is also the former Associate Vice President of Thematic Initiatives and Community Engagement of the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement as well as former Director of the Center for African and African American Studies at The University of Texas. His teaching and research interests include: Culture and power in the African Diaspora, gender studies (particularly Black males), critical race theory, race education, and the racial economy of space and resources. His publications include Disparate Diasporas: Identity and Politics in an African-Nicaraguan Community, 1998 UT Press. Dr. Gordon received his Doctorate in Social Anthropology from Stanford University and his Master's of Arts from Stanford University in Anthropology and Master's degree in Marine Sciences from the University of Miami.

Additional Affiliations:

African and African Diaspora Studies Department, Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies, Center for Women and Gender Studies

Interests

Culture and power in the African Diaspora, gender studies (particularly Black males), critical race theory, race education, and the racial economy of space and resources.

AFR 381 • Black Diaspora Thry/Ethnogrphy

30640 • Fall 2014
Meets W 1000am-100pm CLA 1.302C
(also listed as ANT 391 )
show description
Almost three decades ago, anthropologist and pioneer of African Diaspora Studies, St. Clair Drake, asserted, “the diaspora analogy…needs constant critical analysis if it is to be a useful guide to research as well as a striking metaphor.”  This seminar is designed to introduce students to the variety of ideas that underlie the articulation of the construct of the “BlackDiaspora.”  Although structured through the understanding of the African diaspora as an historical formation, the focus is on the Blackdiaspora as a distinct intellectual project as well as a political one.  As such, we will explore the ways scholars have conceptualized and theorized the “diasporic condition” of Black peoples, and how the community is imagined. These questions have undergirded the contemporary struggle over the meanings of race, place, identity, and consciousness within the African diaspora. Thus, their full examination necessitates intensive discussions and explorations of a number of issues.  In our engagement with theorizations of the African diaspora, we will explore, among other things, global/transnational understandings and articulations of Blackness; the (indispensable?) role of Africa in diasporic identity formations; the relationship between politics and Black cultural production and expression; the interrelationship of race, culture, gender, sexuality and ethnicity; notions of “roots” and “routes” in structuring the diasporic condition; issues of cultural syncretism and hybridity; and the unstable contradiction between notions of “essentialist” origins and social constructions of Black identities.

AFR 303 • Intro Afr/Afr Diaspora Studies

30575 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm UTC 3.132
(also listed as ANT 310L )
show description

This course provides students with an introduction to Black Studies. The first section of the course is devoted to a history of Black Studies in the U.S. using the integration and development of Black Studies here at the University of Texas, Austin as a case study. We will then turn to considerations of the historical construction of Africa, the Black Diaspora and the idea of Blackness. Building on this foundation the course provides students with the analytical tools to critically explore canonical Black Studies literature, themes, and theories. This section of the course interrogates race, gender, class, sexuality, and their intersections as well as culture, power and politics. The second section of the course will focus in on the expression and use of Black Studies in the areas of: Critical Black Studies; Education, Psychology, and Mental Health; Government, Law and Public Policy; Expressive Culture, Arts, Music, Sports; and Africa and its Diasporic Cultures.

AFR 303 • Intro Afr/Afr Diaspora Studies

30265 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm UTC 4.134
(also listed as ANT 310L )
show description

This course provides students with an introduction to Black Studies. The first section of the course is devoted to a history of Black Studies in the U.S. using the integration and development of Black Studies here at the University of Texas, Austin as a case study. We will then turn to considerations of the historical construction of Africa, the Black Diaspora and the idea of Blackness. Building on this foundation the course provides students with the analytical tools to critically explore canonical Black Studies literature, themes, and theories. This section of the course interrogates race, gender, class, sexuality, and their intersections as well as culture, power and politics. The second section of the course will focus in on the expression and use of Black Studies in the areas of: Critical Black Studies; Education, Psychology, and Mental Health; Government, Law and Public Policy; Expressive Culture, Arts, Music, Sports; and Africa and its Diasporic Cultures.

AFR 374D • Minority Stu Leadership Issues

30380 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm JGB 2.202
show description

This course will explore racial identity development by discussing innovative ways to think and talk about race. The course incorporates the use of lectures, readings, simulation exercises, group research project and extensive class discussion to assist students as they explore the psychological impact of racism on all students, regardless of ethnicity.

AFR 303 • Intro Afr/Afr Diaspora Studies

30177 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm JGB 2.218
(also listed as ANT 310L )
show description

This course provides students with an introduction to Black Studies. The first section of the course is devoted to a history of Black Studies in the U.S. using the integration and development of Black Studies here at the University of Texas, Austin as a case study. We will then turn to considerations of the historical construction of Africa, the Black Diaspora and the idea of Blackness. Building on this foundation the course provides students with the analytical tools to critically explore canonical Black Studies literature, themes, and theories. This section of the course interrogates race, gender, class, sexuality, and their intersections as well as culture, power and politics. The second section of the course will focus in on the expression and use of Black Studies in the areas of: Critical Black Studies; Education, Psychology, and Mental Health; Government, Law and Public Policy; Expressive Culture, Arts, Music, Sports; and Africa and its Diasporic Cultures.Required Readings include: Karenga (1982), Hobsbawm and Ranger (1983), Fanon (1967), Lorber (1994, Williams (1983) 87-93, Dubois (1973), Moynihan (1965)

AFR 374D • Minority Student Leadrshp Iss

30355 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm JGB 2.202
show description

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course will explore racial identity development by discussing innovative ways to think and talk about race. The course incorporates the use of lectures, readings, simulation exercises, group research project and extensive class discussion to assist students as they explore the psychological impact of racism on all students, regardless of ethnicity.

COURSE GOALS

Students enrolled in MSLI will Develop an understanding about racial identity development. Develop strategies for facilitating productive dialogue about racial issues. Focus on leadership issues affecting students of color and develop outcome strategies for improvement. Develop skills including research, public speaking, ethical and moral decision-making.

Textbooks The following textbooks are required: Almetris M. Duren, Overcoming: A History of Black Integration at the University of Texas at Austin, 1979, University Printing Division Beverly Daniel Tatum, Ph.D., 1997, “Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?” 1997, Basics Books, Perseus Books Group

AFR 374D • Minority Stu Leadership Issues

30448 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 134
show description

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course will explore racial identity development by discussing innovative ways to think and talk about race. The course incorporates the use of lectures, readings, simulation exercises, group research project and extensive class discussion to assist students as they explore the psychological impact of racism on all students, regardless of ethnicity.

COURSE GOALS

Students enrolled in MSLI will

Ø   Develop an understanding about racial identity development.

Ø   Develop strategies for facilitating productive dialogue about racial issues.

Ø   Focus on leadership issues affecting students of color and develop outcome strategies for improvement. 

Ø   Develop skills including research, public speaking, ethical and moral decision-making.

AFR 320 • Race, Gender, And Nation

30200 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SAC 4.118
(also listed as ANT 324L )
show description

African American Men and Women in Society.

AFR 374D • Minority Std Leadership Issues

30245 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm JGB 2.202
show description

This course will explore racial identity development by discussing innovative ways to think and talk about race. The course incorporates the use of lectures, readings, simulation exercises, group research project and extensive class discussion to assist students as they explore the psychological impact of racism on all students, regardless of ethnicity.   The main course textbook is Beverly Daniel Tatum, Ph.D., 1997,  “Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?”

AFR 301 • African American Culture

35230 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm UTC 4.134
(also listed as AMS 315, ANT 310L )
show description

This course examines the physical, social and economic dimensions of the urban crises with an emphasis on minority communities in general and African American’s in particular. We will explore the dynamics of race and class in American cities.  An interdisciplinary approach will be used to study contemporary issues such as poverty, education, politics and police brutality.

AFR 375 • Community Internship

35555 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm JES A230
show description

Women’s Self Determination and Empowerment through Community Engagement

 

Dr. Lanese Aggrey

Office: SSB 4.442

laggrey@austin.utexas.edu                                                                                                       512.232.6593 (office)

 

Class Time:

Location:

Tuesdays, Thursdays: 12:30 - 2 p.m.

Department of African and African-American Diasporan Studies

Office Hours:

Tuesday, Thursday after class.  Please arrange for appointment.

Course Description:

This academic service learning (ASL) course will:*

  • Focus on the historical and contemporary role of African and African American women as they embody self-determination and empowerment through community engagement and social justice work.
  • Through readings, film, music, reflection activities, classroom discussions, research and community service, this course offers an opportunity to learn about African and African-American women’s role in the shaping of their nations and their communities
  • Participate in service to a community partner serving African-American women in a local, national or global community, or participate in the development of a community organization to serve this population.

This course will be conducted as a seminar. That is, students are expected to participate in graduate level type discussion groups and will be evaluated by their preparation and conduct in these discussion groups. Groups of students will be expected to lead selected discussions on readings, films and/or reflections.  Students not selected to lead that week’s discussion are expected to fully participate in the discussions and will be evaluated as such.  The professor’s role is to help facilitate discussion and reflection activities.

 

Objectives

Course Objectives:  An academic experience that offers historical and contemporary evidence of African and African-American womens‘ self-determination and agency.  Broadly, the curriculum will be connected to service to a community organization serving this population and/or research that contributes to the development of a community organization.

 

Learning Objectives

  • That knowledge gained in this course is fully integrated into general knowledge, not viewed as an add-on.
  • That students will learn about African and African-American women’s contributions to society
  • That students will learn about African and African-American women in Austin
  • That via reflective activities, students will have opportunities to learn more about themselves while they learn about this population
  • That this combination of academic learning with service to the community will offer students a richer, deeper and more complex understanding of African and African-American women’s agency.

 

Requirements:

Course Attendance/Class Participation                                               25pts

(Participation includes, but is not limited to, class attendance, course readings, films and discussion participation about those readings, discussion of reflection activities, completion of service hours with community partner.  Effort to critically engage the curriculum, discussions, service assignments).

Preparation/Facilitation of Weekly Discussions:                               25 pts

Service Activities:                                                                               25 pts

Reflection Activities:                                                                           25 pts

Evaluation:

  • A                95 – 100 pts
  • A-              90 – 94 pts
  • B                85 – 89 pts
  • B-              80 – 84 pts
  • C                75 – 79 pts
  • C-              70 – 74 pts.
  • D                65 – 69 pts
  • D-              60 – 64 pts
  • F                01 – 59 pts

Possible Text:

Text will be provided by either Blackboard, email attachment or printed form.

 

Class Policies

Details

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Policies

1.         Attendance/Tardiness: Attendance and prompt arrival to class are mandatory.  Beyond two absences, each absence will result in 5 points being subtracted from the final grade points. An individual exception will be made only in the event of properly documented extenuating circumstances beyond the student's control.  Tardiness beyond a few SHORT minutes is not acceptable.  Without a valid excuse, tardiness after attendance is taken will be considered an absence.  Please be considerate of your classmates and the instructor by trying your best to be on time.

2.         Late Assignments/Incompletes: Assignments are due on the date assigned.  Three points per day (including weekends) will be deducted for late assignments.  Incompletes for the course will only be given in the case of extenuating circumstances beyond the student's control. 

3.         Research paper format: Because this course is designed to emulate a graduate student seminar, any research papers for the course requires the APA editorial style as the standard format for all written assignments.  Details of the APA style are included in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 4th Edition.  Abbreviated versions may be found online via Google.

5.         Participation: Student’s level of active participation will be assessed in three ways: through group work, community service, reflection activities and individual classroom discussion.

6.         Group conflict: Groups are expected to resolve challenges within their group context.  The instructor is willing to serve as consultant if groups are unable to resolve their differences. Groups are not penalized in their grade for consulting with the instructor.

7.         Respect: The instructor and classmates have the ethical responsibility to see that the class environment is maintained as a respectful and confidential setting. In addition, a student’s class performance, grade, and any other personal information the student discusses with the instructor will be kept confidential.

8.         Professional Conduct in Class  The professor expects students to act like professionals in class. This means students should arrive on time for class, be prepared to participate in the class discussion, and show respect for one another’s opinions. We will not, nor should we, always agree with one another. In this environment we should be exposed to diverse ideas and opinions, and sometime we will not agree with the ideas expressed by others. However, the professor does require that students engage one another with respect and professionalism.

 

 

The University of Texas Honor Code

The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.

 

Policy on Scholastic Dishonesty

Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University.  Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced.  For further information, the student may refer to the Web Site of the Student Judicial Services, Office of the Dean of Students (http://www.utexas.edu/depts/dos/sjs/).

 

Documented Disability Statement

Any student who requires special accommodations must obtain a letter that documents the disability from the Services for Students with Disabilities area of the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement (471-6259 voice or 471-4641 TTY for users who are deaf or hard of hearing). Present the letter to the professor at the beginning of the semester so that needed accommodations can be discussed. The student should remind the professor of any testing accommodations no later than five business days before an exam. For more information, visit http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/.

 

Religious Holidays

By UT Austin policy, students must notify the professor of a pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a religious holy day. If the student must miss a class, an examination, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, the professor will give the student an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

 

Use of E-Mail for Official Correspondence to Students

Email is recognized as an official mode of university correspondence; therefore, students are responsible for reading their email for university and course-related information and announcements. Students are responsible to keep the university informed about changes to their e-mail address. Students should check their e-mail regularly and frequently—daily, but at minimum twice a week—to stay current with university-related communications, some of which may be time-sensitive. Students can find UT Austin’s policies and instructions for updating their e-mail address at http://www.utexas.edu/its/policies/emailnotify.php.

 

Use of Blackboard in Class

Blackboard may be used in some instances as a means of communication.  However, this course will not use Blackboard exclusively for class assignments, etc.  Your flexibility is required.

 

Safety

As part of professional social work education, students may have assignments that involve working in agency settings and/or the community. As such, these assignments may present some risks. Sound choices and caution may lower risks inherent to the profession. It is the student's responsibility to be aware of and adhere to policies and practices related to agency and/or community safety. Students should notify the professor regarding any safety concerns.

 

 Behavior Concerns Advice Line (BCAL)

If students are worried about someone who is acting differently, they may use the Behavior Concerns Advice Line to discuss by phone their concerns about another individual’s behavior. This service is provided through a partnership among the Office of the Dean of Students, the Counseling and Mental Health Center (CMHC), the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), and The University of Texas Police Department (UTPD). Call 512-232-5050 or visit http://www.utexas.edu/safety/bcal.

 

Emergency Evacuation Policy

Occupants of buildings on the UT Austin campus are required to evacuate and assemble outside when a fire alarm is activated or an announcement is made.  Please be aware of the following policies regarding evacuation:

  • Familiarize yourself with all exit doors of the classroom and the building. Remember that the nearest exit door may not be the one you used when you entered the building.
  • If you require assistance to evacuate, inform the professor in writing during the first week of class.
  • In the event of an evacuation, follow the professor’s instructions.
  • Do not re-enter a building unless you’re given instructions by the Austin Fire Department, the UT Austin Police Department, or the Fire Prevention Services office.

 

*PLEASE NOTE:  The nature of academic service learning as a pedagogical  (instructional) method dictates that students, instructor as well as syllabus remain fluid.  In other words, the assignments for this course may change/fluctuate by necessity.  The classroom requirements/expectations, however, will not!  It is imperative that you remain comfortable with this possibility.

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