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Cherise Smith, Ph.D, Director JES A232A, Mailcode D7200, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-1784

Keisha Bentley-Edwards

Assistant Professor Ph.D., Interdisciplinary Studies in Human Development, University of Pennsylvania

Assistant Professor of Educational Psychology
Keisha Bentley-Edwards

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Biography

Dr. Keisha L. Bentley-Edwards is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology of the College of Education. Her research examines the processes by which young people understand their cultural selves and how this meaning making influences relationships, academic achievement, well-being and a sense of social responsibility. 

Her research has focused on how cultural strengths can be used as a source of resilience by minimizing the negative outcomes related to racism stress, violence and aggression, and school/community stressors for youth. She has co-developed measurements of racial/ethnic socialization and racial cohesion, primarily in the Black community, and used these culturally relevant assessments to ascertain their influence on youth health, social and academic outcomes. Dr. Keisha Bentley-Edwards also examines the racialized experiences and socialization of White youth to better understand their influences on interactions with people of color. Her emerging research will examine the sociocultural factors related to bullying behavior and victimization.

Dr. Keisha L. Bentley Edwards has a strong belief that research should provide the theoretical framework and empirical evidence to guide practice and intervention. Using an action-research approach, she explores resiliency and cultural competence in the context of 1) the processes of racial socialization, 2) community vs. individual investment in the Black community, 3) risk and protective factors in coping with racism and 4) class and upward mobility.

AFR 372D • Life Span Devel Of Black Women

30312 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm SZB 422
(also listed as WGS 340 )
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Using a worldview that utilizes Womanism/Black feminist, Africentrism and ecological frameworks, this course will focus on the psychological and social issues that promote and impede the optimal lifespan development of Black women.

 

This course seeks to foster an in-depth, critical discussion of Black women’s development by investigating multiple dimensions of philosophical, historical, theoretical, empirical and application matters in the following areas: the importance of African worldviews within African-American cultures, the impact of racism and sexism upon psychological adjustment, the socialization and intersection of racial, gender and sexual identities. A range of contemporary issues will be actively discussed including socioeconomic status, political climate, social norms, gender/ethnic identity, mental health, family dynamics, academic achievement and social adjustment into a unifying, comprehensive framework. 

AFR 374D • Psychol Of Afr Amer Experience

30360 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SZB 422
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Required Texts:

Textbook: Neville, H. A., Tynes, B. M., & Utsey, S. O. (2009). Handbook of African American Psychology.

Thousand Oaks, CA US: Sage Publications, Inc.

Additional Readings are on Blackboard.

 

Course Description:

Using a worldview that utilizes Africentrism, racial/ethnic socialization and ecological frameworks, this course will focus on the psychological and social issues that promote and impede the optimal lifespan development of Black women, men, and children in the US and the Diaspora. This course promotes relevant community empowerment and action.

 

Course Objectives:

To foster an in-depth, critical discussion of African American development, this course will investigate multiple dimensions of philosophical, historical, theoretical, empirical and application matters in the following areas: the importance of African worldviews within African-American cultures, the impact of racism and sexism upon psychological adjustment, the socialization and intersection of racial, gender and sexual identities. A range of contemporary issues will be actively discussed including socioeconomic status, political climate, social norms, gender/ethnic identity, mental health, family dynamics, academic achievement and social adjustment into a unifying, comprehensive framework. Active student participation is not only encouraged but also expected.

 

Course Ground Rules:

It is expected that each student will:

  • • Be courteous and allow speakers to complete her/his thought(s) before speaking
  • • Be respectful of the opinions of others, even if there is a disagreement
  • • Be involved by participating in discussions and activities, but not dominating either
  • • Be an active participant and learner who is interested in increasing her/his knowledge base
  • • Come to class having completed the readings and prepared to participate in discussions & activities
  • • Maintain academic integrity – more simply, you will not cheat on an assignment or plagiarize a paper. Doing

so will result in immediate failure of this course.

 

Grading Scale:

Grade Percentage:

10% Attendance & Participation

15% Reading Discussions

25% Mid-Term Exam

25% Cultural Debate Forums

25% Final Exam

 

93-100% A 90-92% A- 87-89% B+ 83-86% B 80-82% B-

77-79% C+ 73-76% C 70-72% C- 60-69% D Below 60% F

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