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Cherise Smith, Ph.D, Director JES A232A, Mailcode D7200, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-1784

Kevin Cokley

Professor Ph.D., 1998, Counseling Psychology, Georgia State University

Professor of Educational Psychology and of African and African Diaspora Studies
Kevin Cokley

Contact

Biography

Kevin Cokley, Ph.D. is a Professor of Counseling Psychology and Faculty Affiliate of the Center for African and African American Studies at the University of Texas-Austin. Dr. Cokley’s research and teaching can be broadly categorized in the area of African American psychology. His research interests include the construction of racial and ethnic identities, Afrocentric psychology, academic motivation, academic self-concept, and understanding the psychological and environmental factors that impact African American student achievement. Dr. Cokley has published over 35 articles and book chapters. His 2004 article published in the Harvard Educational Review challenges the notion that African American students are anti-intellectual. He is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Black Psychology, and has served on the editorial boards of several journals including the Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology journal and the Journal of Counseling Psychology. He is the recipient of the 2008 “10 Rising Stars of the Academy” award by Diverse Issues in Higher Education, the 2007 Association of Black Psychologists’ Scholarship Award, and the 2004 co-recipient of the Emerging Professional Award given by the Society for the Psychological Study of Ethnic Minority Issues of the American Psychological Association.

Interests

Racial and Ethnic Identity Development; Factors that Impact Academic Achievement of African American Students; Academic Self-Concept, Academic Motivation; Multicultural Psychology and Issues of Race, Ethnicity, and Culture; Afrocentric/African-centered Psychology

AFR 374D • Psychol Of Afr Amer Experience

30765 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SZB 330
show description

Required Texts and Readings:

1. *Belgrave, F. Z., & Allison, K. W. (2006). African American Psychology: From Africa to America. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

2. **Blackboard Readings

Required:

Students are required to go to the link of the Journal of Black Psychology (JBP) at

http://jbp.sagepub.com/ to read cutting edge psychological research related to people of

African descent.

Course Description:

This course is an introduction to understanding the psychology of people of African descent. The course examines the psychology of people of African descent using an African-centered (Afrocentric) liberatory conceptual model. Alternative conceptual models of African/Black psychology will also be examined. Topics that will be covered in the course include Ancient African philosophical underpinnings of African/African American psychology, the psychological impact of enslavement, Black/African/African American identity and personality development, psychological issues in educating Africans/African Americans, aggression, violence, crime, mental health, and the psychological impact of hip hop.

This course is reading intensive; therefore, it is critically important that all assigned readings are completed prior to each class in order that a high-level, scholarly discussion will ensue. The nature of the topics addressed in this course is such that rote lecturing is deemed by me to be inappropriate. The course is thus designed primarily as a seminar where class discussion is expected. I will only lecture in instances when the material is particularly challenging. I expect that you will come prepared every class to engage in a focused exchange of ideas related to the various readings. I will facilitate these exchanges, making appropriate commentary as necessary.

Course Objectives:

Upon completion of this course you will be able to:

1. Demonstrate knowledge of the historical roots of African psychology from an African-centered (Afrocentric) perspective and be able to identify the development of African American/Black psychology as a distinct system of psychological thought

2. Demonstrate an understanding of the major terms and concepts of African-centered (Afrocentric) psychology. This includes the Africentric worldview, African self-consciousness, MAAT, Maafa, the extended self, and Sankofa.

3. Demonstrate a critical awareness and understanding of the major models of African/Black identity, personality, and psychological functioning. These models include Cross’s Nigrescence theory and Kambon’s African Self-Consciousness theory.

4. Conceptualize and critique issues impacting all Africans in the diaspora using

an African-centered psychological framework.

5. Explore your thoughts, values, and beliefs (i.e., worldview) as they relate to psychological and social experiences.

Course Requirements:

1. Student should come PREPARED TO EVERY CLASS having read daily class readings.

2. There will be 3 REACTION PAPERS. These reaction papers should be 2 full pages, double-spaced using Time New Roman 12 pt font and will be based on your personal reaction to the videos. These papers should not just be summaries of the videos. The grading criteria for the reaction papers will be as follows:

5 points clarity, organization, and grammatically correct; proofread!

5 points adequacy of factual information presented; quality of personal reactions (i.e., superficial vs. substantive)

example of superficial comments:

"I liked the video because it

was deep. It took place in Africa and showed that all Africans don’t look alike."

example of substantive comments:

"I really enjoyed this video

because it forced me to examine some of my deeply-ingrained,

negative thoughts about Africans."

3. There will be 6 pop quizzes. Each quiz will consist of five multiple choice questions which will cover readings due for the day. The questions will address the following areas:

1. What was the author’s philosophical orientation in terms of school of thought (i.e., traditional, reform, or radical)?

2. What issues did the author discuss? What were the author’s beliefs?

4. The personal growth paper should reflect how (if at all) the class has impacted

you. What did you learn? Do you see things differently?

5. Consistent with an African-centered (Afrocentric) orientation, the final exam will be taken in 2 groups of approximately 7 students. Groups will be determined by the instructor.

Breakdown of Grades:

Points

Requirement

 

30 points

 

3 Reaction Papers worth 10 points each

 

30 points

 

6 Pop Quizzes worth 5 points each

 

20 points

 

2 Page Personal Growth Paper

 

20 points

 

Attendance

 

100 points

 

Final Exam

 

AFR 317F • The Politics Of Black Identity

30305 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SZB 296
show description

Throughout the history of African Americans there has existed a tradition whereby individuals whose attitudes, behavior, and politics differ from the Black majority have been labeled as Uncle Toms, negros, sellouts, and various other denigrating names. Underlying these labels is an orthodoxy of Black ideology that prescribes what is, and isn’t, authentic and normative Blackness. This course analyzes the idea that the activities and practices of certain Black celebrities, leaders, and intellectuals undermine Black progress.

 

Texts:

Kennedy, Randall (2008): Sellout: The Politics of Racial Betrayal. Vintage Books. Baker, Houston (2008). Betrayal: How Black Intellectuals Have Abandoned the Ideals of the Civil Rights Era, University Press.

Grading breakdown:

6.7% Reaction Paper

26.7% - 8 pop quizzes 

26.7% - 4 journals

6.7% - Research Participation

33.3% final exam

AFR 374D • Psychol Of Afr Amer Experience

30385 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm SZB 330
show description

Required Texts:

Textbook: Neville, H. A., Tynes, B. M., & Utsey, S. O. (2009). Handbook of African American Psychology.

Thousand Oaks, CA US: Sage Publications, Inc.

Additional Readings are on Blackboard.

 

Course Description:

Using a worldview that utilizes Africentrism, racial/ethnic socialization and ecological frameworks, this course will focus on the psychological and social issues that promote and impede the optimal lifespan development of Black women, men, and children in the US and the Diaspora. This course promotes relevant community empowerment and action.

 

Course Objectives:

To foster an in-depth, critical discussion of African American development, this course will investigate multiple dimensions of philosophical, historical, theoretical, empirical and application matters in the following areas: the importance of African worldviews within African-American cultures, the impact of racism and sexism upon psychological adjustment, the socialization and intersection of racial, gender and sexual identities. A range of contemporary issues will be actively discussed including socioeconomic status, political climate, social norms, gender/ethnic identity, mental health, family dynamics, academic achievement and social adjustment into a unifying, comprehensive framework. Active student participation is not only encouraged but also expected.

 

Course Ground Rules:

It is expected that each student will:

  • • Be courteous and allow speakers to complete her/his thought(s) before speaking
  • • Be respectful of the opinions of others, even if there is a disagreement
  • • Be involved by participating in discussions and activities, but not dominating either
  • • Be an active participant and learner who is interested in increasing her/his knowledge base
  • • Come to class having completed the readings and prepared to participate in discussions & activities
  • • Maintain academic integrity – more simply, you will not cheat on an assignment or plagiarize a paper. Doing

so will result in immediate failure of this course.

 

Grading Scale:

Grade Percentage:

10% Attendance & Participation

15% Reading Discussions

25% Mid-Term Exam

25% Cultural Debate Forums

25% Final Exam

 

93-100% A 90-92% A- 87-89% B+ 83-86% B 80-82% B-

77-79% C+ 73-76% C 70-72% C- 60-69% D Below 60% F

AFR F374D • Psychol Of Afr Amer Experience

81735 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTH 100pm-300pm SZB 330
show description

This course is an introduction to understanding the psychology of people of African descent. The course examines the psychology of people of African descent using an African-centered (Afrocentric) liberatory conceptual model. Alternative conceptual models of African/Black psychology will also be examined. Topics that will be covered in the course include Ancient African philosophical underpinnings of African/African American psychology, the psychological impact of enslavement, Black/African/African American identity and personality development, psychological issues in educating Africans/African Americans, aggression, violence, crime, mental health, and the psychological impact of hip hop.This course is reading intensive; therefore, it is critically important that all assigned readings are completed prior to each class in order that a high-level, scholarly discussion will ensue. The nature of the topics addressed in this course is such that rote lecturing is deemed by me to be inappropriate. The course is thus designed primarily as a seminar where class discussion is expected. I will only lecture in instances when the material is particularly challenging. I expect that you will come prepared every class to engage in a focused exchange of ideas related to the various readings. I will facilitate these exchanges, making appropriate commentary as necessary.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course you will be able to:

1. Demonstrate knowledge of the historical roots of African psychology from an African-centered (Afrocentric) perspective and be able to identify the development of African American/Black psychology as a distinct system of psychological thought

2. Demonstrate an understanding of the major terms and concepts of African-centered (Afrocentric) psychology. This includes the Africentric worldview, African self- consciousness, MAAT, Maafa, the extended self, and Sankofa.

3. Demonstrate a critical awareness and understanding of the major models of African/Black identity, personality, and psychological functioning. These models include Cross’s Nigrescence theory and Kambon’s African Self-Consciousness theory.

4. Conceptualize and critique issues impacting all Africans in the diaspora using an African-centered psychological framework.

5. Explore your thoughts, values, and beliefs (i.e., worldview) as they relate to psychological and social experiences.

AFR 374D • Psychol Of Afr Amer Experience

30450 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm SZB 330
show description

This course is an introduction to understanding the psychology of people of African descent. The course examines the psychology of people of African descent using an African-centered (Afrocentric) liberatory conceptual model. Alternative conceptual models of African/Black psychology will also be examined.  Topics that will be covered in the course include Ancient African philosophical underpinnings of African/African American psychology, the psychological impact of enslavement, Black/African/African American identity and personality development, psychological issues in educating Africans/African Americans, aggression, violence, crime, mental health, and the psychological impact of hip hop.

AFR 317F • The Politics Of Black Identity

30185 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am UTC 4.124
show description

The Politics of Black Identity

 

Course Description: While a common bond through skin color is assumed amongpeople identified as Black, there exists a tremendous amount of diversitybased on ethnicity, socio-economic status, values, political ideology, andbeliefs around racial allegiance. Through history there has existed atradition whereby Black individuals whose attitudes, behavior, and politicsdiffer from the Black majority have been labeled as Uncle Toms, negros,sellouts, and various other denigrating names. Underlying these labels is anorthodoxy of Black identity that prescribes what is, and isn't, authenticand normative Blackness. This course surveys the diversity and politics ofBlack identities and critically analyzes the idea that the behaviors,attitudes, and philosophies of certain Black celebrities, leaders, andintellectuals undermine or advance Black progress.

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