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Cherise Smith, Ph.D, Director JES A232A, Mailcode D7200, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-1784

Maria Franklin

Associate Professor Ph.D., 1997, Anthropology, University of California at Berkeley

Associate Professor of Anthropology and of African and African Diaspora Studies

Contact

Interests

Historical archaeology, archaeological theory, African Diaspora studies, race and gender, feminist theory, colonialism and slavery.

AFR 372F • Archaeol/Hist Slavery In N. Am

30395 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SAC 4.174
(also listed as ANT 324L )
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Course Description:

This course is a comparative survey of the institution of slavery on the American mainland from thecolonial through the antebellum periods. An interdisciplinary perspective will be employed through readings, exercises, lectures and discussions related to the archaeology and history of slavery. We will begin with discussions of some of the key issues and questions that scholars of American slavery have addressed over time, and consider a few of the theories concerning identity formation and enslaved Africans. Following lectures/discussions focus on the development of plantation societies, particularly among the English, and later, the Americans. While plantation economies will be covered, the emphasis will be on issues related to society and culture from the viewpoint of enslaved Africans and blacks. Further, rather than view slavery as a dominant institution, the class will consider the ways in which those in bondage covertly and overtly resisted their enslavement. Their social and cultural practices,it will be argued, were crucial in carrying out these acts. By considering a variety of case studies from the 17th to the 19th centuries, covering diverse regions and locales, we can study the development of race-based slavery, understand its role in the transformation of American society and culture, and recognize the diversity of experiences that shaped, and were shaped by, this institution.

Topics to be covered include the following:

I. Race and gender

II. Life within the enslaved community

A. Cultural practices (for example, foodways, landscapes, religion, and craft production).

B. Social institutions (for example, families, slave quarter communities, and marriage practices).

III. Relationships between slaveowners and the enslaved.

IV. Plantations: cotton, sugar, rice, and tobacco.

V. Institution of slavery: legal codes, planter ideologies, relationship to race and racism.

VI. Labor diversity within the system of slavery: urban vs. rural, artisans and skilled labor, field labor,domestic work.

VII. Opposition and resistance: slave uprisings, abolitionism, the Underground Railroad, maroonage, runaways, etc.

VIII. Interpreting historical sources related to slavery.

Course Goals:

By the end of the semester, you should be able to do the following:

 Compare and contrast the diversity of plantation systems by considering the following factors: settlement patterns, built environments, labor forces, and planting/processing techniques involved in sugar, rice, cotton, and tobacco agriculture.

 Discuss the diversity of experiences of enslaved blacks and Africans with regard to different sociohistorical contexts (e.g., 17th-century Chesapeake, Spanish Florida, 19th-century Louisiana, etc.). Critically analyze the role of gender in shaping the experiences of enslaved individuals.

 Demonstrate how enslaved groups actively participated in the creation of cultural practices and socialinstitutions. Assess the various strategies of resistance used by both the free and the enslaved to challenge the system of slavery.

 Possess some basic knowledge on how to use primary historical documents and material culture to interpret the lifeways, experiences, and perspectives of slaveowners and the enslaved.

Course Requirements: Final grades will be based on the percentage of points scored out of a possible “100”. The total points possible are divided as follows:

(1) Two in-class group exercises (5 pts. each) = 10 points

(2) Journal entries (4 pts. each) = 40 points

(3) Discussion (5 pts. each) = 10 points

(4) Wiki project = 40 points

Group exercises

You must arrive on time to class in order to receive full credit for completing each group assignment. The handouts needed for both will be posted on Blackboard. Please print these out (bring the handouts to class), read them over and be prepared to start the assignment at the beginning of class.

Journals

The “Journal” tool in Blackboard has been set up. I will post the questions and/or issues that you should address foreach entry on Blackboard (under Announcements), and announce them in class (or via email).The journals will help me to evaluate and keep track of your progress over the semester in comprehending course content and in meeting course goals. Focus on the readings when journaling. The main things that I am looking for when grading (but you don’t have to incorporate all 3 for each entry) are: comprehension of the author’s objectives and your ability to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of his/her arguments, your ability to relate the reading to the day’s topic(s) and contextualize it more broadly within the major course goals, and, importantly, how well you address the issue/question assigned for each entry using specific evidence from the reading(s). Please feel free to provide your reflections on how well you’re doing in the course. Your journals will only be viewable by you and I.

Due dates for journal entries are listed in the schedule below; you must complete your entry by 11am on the due date or it will be considered late. Each entry should be around 250 words.

DiscussionsGoal: To provide a forum for class discussion of course materials as a means of ensuring that students are wellversed on the subject matters to date before moving forward. This is an opportunity to engage in friendly debate, ask questions that still linger for you, and to try and grasp how specific readings, etc. relate to broader course goals.

You will be assigned two discussion dates; there are six altogether. You are required to coordinate with your codiscussants (you can email one another via Blackboard) in completing the following:

1) Each co-discussant must come up with 2 questions/topics/debates related to the readings, video, and to a lesser extent, the lectures assigned to your group. These should be grouped by themes (e.g., plantation labor, resistance to slavery, women’s experiences, cultural production, etc.). Please do not recycle questions assigned for journal entries.

Your questions should be aimed towards generating a productive class discussion, so don’t make them too easy. Feel free to post questions that you yourself don’t know the answer to!

2) One student will be responsible for putting together a handout of the above and forwarding the document to me via email by 9am on the day of the discussion. I will bring copies to hand out in class. Please be sure that the name of each student who contributed to the assignment is listed on the handout. This is the document that I’ll use for grading.3) Finally: you must be present on the days that you are assigned or you will receive no credit even if you contributed to this assignment.

Wiki project

Your major project for this class is to create a wiki page based on interpretations of a selection of ex-slave narratives from the Federal Writer’s Project. You are responsible for coming up with a research question on life during antebellum slavery, choosing a minimum of 7 narratives and 3 scholarly readings to address it, and then writing an essay based upon your interpretation of the sources. Your essay should be between 1,700 to 2,000 words (about 3.5- 4 single-spaced pages).

Do not use the narratives assigned to our class for this project. As for articles/books, you can use one from class, but you are expected to conduct research for this paper in finding appropriate source materials.

You will be given a tutorial on working with Dupral wikis, which are very user friendly. The wiki editor allows you to incorporate hyperlinks, images, sound bites, etc., into your text. Be creative in constructing your wiki page by using these features since part of your grade will be based upon your resourcefulness in finding relevant media to integrate into your essay. There are ample sources on the web that can be used.

A 100-150 word abstract of your project, stating your main question and listing your 3 scholarly reference works, is due on November 1. The abstracts will allow me to assess whether or not you have a suitable question and supporting references. You may be asked to revise your topic or find alternate readings. Note: Abstracts will not be graded, but 6 points will be deducted from your wiki assignment for failure to turn this in.

A handout with more specifics will be made available in October. If you prefer to get started on this assignment sooner, there are plenty of books at the PCL containing the ex-slave narratives, or you can simply go to:

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/snhtml/snhome.html

Policy on late assignments: A late assignment will only be accepted with prior approval from the instructor.

In this case, only a one-week extension of the deadline will be granted and 50% of the points possible will be deducted from the final assignment grade.

Grading Scale:

90 – 100 = A

80 – 89 = B

70 – 79 = C

60 – 69 = D

59 and below = F

Required Texts available at the UT Co-op:

1. Ira Berlin, “Generations in Captivity,” 2003. This book is also available electronically via UTnetcat.

2. Leland Ferguson, “Uncommon Ground”, ([1992]2004).

AFR 381 • African Diaspora Anthropology

30455 • Spring 2013
Meets W 900am-1200pm BEL 232
(also listed as ANT 392R )
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Almost three decades ago, anthropologist and pioneer of African Diaspora Studies, St. Clair Drake, asserted, “the diaspora analogy...needs constant critical analysis if it is to be a useful guide to research as well as a striking metaphor.” This seminar is designed to introduce students to the variety of ideas that underlie the articulation of the construct of the “African diaspora.” Although structured through the understanding of the African diaspora as an historical formation, the focus is on the African diaspora as a distinct intellectual project as well as a political one. As such, we will explore the ways scholars have conceptualized and theorized the “diasporadic condition” of Black peoples, and how the community is imagined. These questions have undergirded the contemporary struggle over the meanings of race, place, identity, and consciousness within the African diaspora. Thus, their full examination necessitates intensive discussions and explorations of a number of issues.

In our engagement with theorizations of the African diaspora, we will explore, among other things, global/transnational understandings and articulations of Blackness; the (indispensable?) role of Africa in diasporic identity formations; the relationship between politics and Black cultural production and expression; the interrelationship of race, culture, gender, sexuality and ethnicity; notions of “roots” and “routes” in structuring the diasporadic condition; issues of cultural syncretism and hybridity; and the unstable contradiction between notions of “essentialist” origins and social constructions of Black identities.

This seminar meets the Dept. of Anthropology’s core requirement. As a “sixth” core course, it addresses both the anthropology and archaeology of the African Diaspora. 

AFR 374D • Archaeol/Hist Slavery In N Am

30347 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SAC 4.118
(also listed as ANT 324L )
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This course is a comparative survey of the institution of slavery on the American mainland (with some discussion of the Caribbean) from the era of seventeenth-century European colonialism through the antebellum period.  We will begin by exploring Portuguese, French, Dutch, British and Spanish colonizing efforts in the Americas, and their varying roles in the trans-Atlantic slave trade.  The class proceeds with discussions of the Middle Passage, and the development of plantation societies.  Whileplantation economies will be covered, the emphasis will be on issues related to society, culture, and identity formation, particularly amongst the enslaved.Thus, the course will cover the daily life experiences of enslaved peoples within a variety of sociohistorical contexts marked by relations of domination and resistance.  Through historical and archaeological evidence, one begins, however, to understand that there existed no monolithic enslaved experience.  Rather, a diversity of experiences, and a range of cultural and social institutions characterized enslaved life.  The issue of identity formation is central here: race, as a social construct, was variously instituted and negotiated under different colonial powers, but nonetheless served as a powerful marker in slave societies.  We will, therefore, consider racial formation from a comparative perspective. 

AFR 374D • Archaeol/Hist Slavery In N Am

30235 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SAC 4.174
(also listed as ANT 324L )
show description

This course is a comparative survey of the institution of slavery on the American mainland (with some discussion of the Caribbean) from the era of seventeenth-century European colonialism through the antebellum period.  We will begin by exploring Portuguese, French, Dutch, British and Spanish colonizing efforts in the Americas, and their varying roles in the trans-Atlantic slave trade.  The class proceeds with discussions of the Middle Passage, and the development of plantation societies.  Whileplantation economies will be covered, the emphasis will be on issues related to society, culture, and identity formation, particularly amongst the enslaved.Thus, the course will cover the daily life experiences of enslaved peoples within a variety of sociohistorical contexts marked by relations of domination and resistance.  Through historical and archaeological evidence, one begins, however, to understand that there existed no monolithic enslaved experience.  Rather, a diversity of experiences, and a range of cultural and social institutions characterized enslaved life.  The issue of identity formation is central here: race, as a social construct, was variously instituted and negotiated under different colonial powers, but nonetheless served as a powerful marker in slave societies.  We will, therefore, consider racial formation from acomparative perspective. 

AFR 376 • Senior Seminar

35560 • Spring 2010
Meets W 200pm-500pm JES A230
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AFR376 SENIOR SEMINAR:  Race, Politics, and Popular Culture                        Spring 2010

Dr. Maria Franklin, Dept. of Anthropology and the

Center for African and African American Studies

 

JES232A, Weds. 2-5pm

Phone: 471-8513 Office: EPS 2.130

Email: mfranklin@mail.utexas.edu

Office hours: Tues. 12:30-2pm and by appointment.

 

Course Description:

 

This seminar explores race and racism through the dynamics of popular culture. Popular culture is used here in the broadest sense of the term to refer to the mainstream, mass-produced, and widely circulated forms of cultural production: TV, movies, music, art, etc. Given pop culture’s varied manifestations and global reach, it is an idea subject through which to approach issues of identity and power. Popular culture’s consumers and producers come from all walks of life, cutting across lines of sexuality, race, gender, and class. Indeed, it is a form of cultural production that is easily accessible to the disenfranchised who have, historically, used popular culture as a means of resistance and to express individual and collective identities. Yet, it is a highly contested field of power, where resistance is typically met to varying degrees with dismissal, policing, and appropriation.

 

The readings and discussions will focus on issues of race and racism, although other vectors of difference (gender, class, and sexuality) that intersect with race will also feature prominently. The general goal of the seminar is to provide students with a greater context for comprehending racism in the U.S. by examining race through the everyday practices that we all participate in but, too often, fail to consume through a more critical lens. Popular culture’s influence on politics, society, and the economy are far reaching, and it is the intention of this seminar to unravel these relationships.

 

Course Requirements:

 

1. Seminar coordination: Groups of 2-3 students will be responsible for co-leading three discussions. This includes a short presentation (5-10 mins.) of the core ideas found in the readings, and preparation of a one-page outline for each set of readings (with discussion topics/questions). One suggestion for coordination is that you divide up the duties and have one person do the introduction of the readings, and the other one or two co-discussants prepare the handout. It is important that you do all of the readings as co-discussants are charged with moderating the discussion and providing their perspective on the readings.

 

If you email me your handout no later than 3pm the Monday before your discussion day, I can photocopy it for the class. Otherwise, it’s your responsibility to do so.

 

2.  Required drafts and papers: The major portion of your grade will be determined by your performance on written assignments. There are three 5-7 page essays (plus a rough draft of each) based on the readings due over the course of the semester. You will be provided with the paper topics and a guideline for formatting your papers. You are required to meet with me to discuss 2 out of 3 of your drafts, and these meetings will take place in 10-minute time slots on the Wednesdays (from 1-2pm or 4-5pm) before the final papers are due. Please note: final papers will not be accepted unless a draft of the paper is turned in for comments.

 

You need only email me a copy of your drafts. For final papers, please turn in a hard copy plus email a copy.

Due dates:

 

Paper 1: draft (emailed by 5pm, Weds., Feb. 17); final paper (Mar. 3 at the beginning of class).

Paper 2: draft (emailed by 5pm, Weds., Mar. 24); final paper (Apr. 7 at the beginning of class).

Paper 3: draft (emailed by 5pm, Weds., Apr. 21); final paper (May 7).

 

NOTE: Late drafts and final papers will be marked down 50% of the earned grade.

 

3. Seminar participation: Given that this is a seminar, everyone is expected to do all of the reading and fully (i.e., vocally) participate in seminar discussions. I will call on individuals to answer questions posed by the discussants to ensure that our discussions are inclusive. A lack of engagement will be reflected in your final grade, which could be knocked down a grade for a consistent failure to actively participate.

 

4. Attendance is required, and roll will be taken. Since there are only 15 class meetings, your presence is important. For each unexcused absence, 5 points will be deducted from your final grade. Please make every effort to be on time to class.

 

5. Minute papers: Towards the end of each class, a question will be posed based on that day’s readings and/or discussion. You will have a minute to provide a written response. You will either earn “0” or 1 point for each. Although you will turn in 13 minute papers, only 10 will count towards your final grade (i.e., you can “throw out” three scores).

 

6. Reading notes: At the end of each class, please submit your notes on the day’s readings. Comments will not be provided on your notes. They will be read in order to track your progress in the seminar and to evaluate your comprehension of the readings.

 

Grading Criteria:

 

Co-lead 3 discussions + prepare handouts (5 pts. each) = 15 points

3 drafts (5 pts. each) + final papers (15 pts. each) = 60 points

10 “minute papers” (1 pt. each) = 10 points

Reading notes (2 pts. deducted for failure to turn in notes for the week) = 15 points

 

TOTAL possible points  = 100

 

Readings 

 

All readings (and grades) will be posted on Blackboard (http://courses.utexas.edu) under “Course Documents”.

 

SCHEDULE OF TOPICS

 

January 20:  Introduction to Seminar.

 

January 27: Africana and Black Studies

 

Aldridge, Delores P., and Carlene Young

2000     Historical Development and Introduction to the Academy. In Out of the Revolution: The Development of Africana Studies. D.P. Aldridge and C. Young, eds. Pp. 3-12. Lanham: Lexington Books.

 

 

 

Rojas, Fabio

2007     From Black Power to Black Studies: How a Radical Social Movement Became an Academic Discipline. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

 

Nelson, William E. Jr.

2000     Black Studies, Student Activism, and the Academy. In Out of the Revolution: The Development of Africana Studies. D.P. Aldridge and C. Young, eds. Pp. 79-91. Lanham: Lexington Books.

 

February 3: Theories of Race, Racism

 

Delgado, Richard and Jean Stefancic

2001     Critical Race Theory: An Introduction. New York University Press, New York.

 

Lipsitz, George

The Possessive Investment in Whiteness: How White People Profit from Identity Politics. Temple University Press.

 

Omi, Michael and Howard Winant.

1994  Racial Formation in the United States: From the 1960s to the 1990s. Routledge.

 

Sanjek, Roger

1996     The Enduring Inequalities of Race. In Race, edited by S. Gregory and R. Sanjek, pp. 1-17. New Brunswick, NJ, New Brunswick, NJ.

 

Suggested readings: In Discover, vol. 15, number 2 (November 1994), the following articles:

Terms of Estrangement, James Shreeve.

Race Without Color, Jared Diamond.

 

February 10: Black Feminist Theory and Politics

 

The Combahee River Collective Statement (April 1977). http://www.feministezine.com/feminist/modern/Black-Feminist-Statement.html

 

Lorde, Audre. Sister Outsider. Freedom, CA: The Crossing Press, 1984. 

 

Collins, Patricia Hill. Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment, pp. 19-40. New York: Routledge. 1991.

 

Crenshaw, Kimberle.     Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence against Women of Color. Stanford Law Review, Vol. 43, No. 6. pp. 1241-1299. 1991.

 

February 17: The Early Years of Race and American Pop Culture

 

Video - Ethnic Notions (Directed by Marlon Riggs)

 

February 24: Race, Gender, and Spectator Sports

 

March 3: Racialized Bodies in Mainstream Culture

 

March 10: Mixed-Race Politics: Racial Transgressions or Accomodations?

 

March 15-20: Spring Break

 

March 24: Music and Black Resistance

 

March 31: Whiteness and “Black” Music

 

April 7: Race in the Media Spotlight

 

April 14: Dominant Representations of Race in Cinema

 

April 21: Black Consciousness in the Film Industry

 

April 28: Case Study

 

Movie: Precious (Directed by Lee Daniels)

 

May 5: Discussion

 

 

 

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