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Cherise Smith, Ph.D, Director JES A232A, Mailcode D7200, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-1784

Moyosore (Moyo) Okediji

Professor Ph.D., 1995, African and African American Arts, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Professor of Art and Art History

Contact

Biography

Moyo Okediji is an art historian, artist, and curator. He studied fine arts at the University of Ife, before proceeding to the University of Benin, where he did an MFA in African art criticism, poetry, and painting. At the University of Wisconsin, Madison, he received a Ph.D. in African arts and Diaspora visual cultures.  He has apprenticed with several indigenous African artists working in both sacred and secular mediums including mat weaving, textile designs, terra cotta, shrine painting, and sculpture.

After teaching for several years in Nigeria, Okediji relocated to the United States in 1992. For ten years he was the curator of African and Oceanic arts at the Denver Art Museum. he has taught at various colleges in the United States, including Wellesley College, Gettysburg College, university of Wisconsin, Madison, and the University of Colorado at Denver. He has also exhibited at various places including the New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York, The Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC,. the Corcoran Center, London, and the National Museum Gallery, Lagos Nigeria.  he is the author of books and exhibition catalogues including African Renaissance, Old Forms, New Images in Nigerian Art; and The Shattered Gourd: Yoruba Forms in Twentieth Century American Art.

AFR 374F • Diaspora Vision

30485 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm ART 1.120
(also listed as WGS 340 )
show description

Women's experiences in different cultures. Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.

Topic: Diaspora visions: exiles, aliens and nomads.

AFR 374F • Africana Women's Art

30425 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm DFA 2.204
(also listed as WGS 340 )
show description

Can we adopt the criteria used for the analysis and presentation of western art and artists for the analysis and presentation of works by Africana women artists? How do we define Africana women’s art and artists? Who are the most influential Africana women artists, and in which mediums do they work? What tasks do they tackle and what challenges face them? What are the stylistic diversities that define and distinguish their contributions? What are the technological tools available to them, and how have they manipulated and fashioned these tools? How have they shaped the past and present trends in art history, and what are their aspirations and hopes for the future? These are some of the questions that this course will investigate with the use of art historical and critical theories that draw on oral and written literatures, music, films, and other formal and informal documents.

AFR 374F • Diaspora Vision

30380 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am ART 2.208
(also listed as WGS 340 )
show description

Women's experiences in different cultures. Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history; these are identified in the Course Schedule.

AFR 374F • Introduction To African Art

30395 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm DFA 2.204
(also listed as WGS 340 )
show description

With the use of technical approaches and ideological positions that demonstrate the challenges and opportunities of femininity, black women in indigenous African societies have made important contributions to the arts of painting, ceramics, textiles, mixed media installations, and performance arts for hundreds of years. Their creativity continues into contemporary times in the works by women artists who combine international techniques, modern technologies, and feminist ideas to project individual and collective experiences.  By investigating analytical matters such as sexuality, class, religion, race, and ethnic  multiplicities, this course will investigate works by African women within the continent and also in the diasporas, including Europe, South America, the Caribbean, and North America.

AFR 374F • Africana Women's Art

30510 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm DFA 2.204
(also listed as WGS 340 )
show description

Can we adopt the criteria used for the analysis and presentation of western art and artists for the analysis and presentation of works by Africana women artists? How do we define Africana women’s art and artists? Who are the most influential Africana women artists, and in which mediums do they work? What tasks do they tackle and what challenges face them? What are the stylistic diversities that define and distinguish their contributions? What are the technological tools available to them, and how have they manipulated and fashioned these tools? How have they shaped the past and present trends in art history, and what are their aspirations and hopes for the future? These are some of the questions that this course will investigate with the use of art historical and critical theories that draw on oral and written literatures, music, films, and other formal and informal documents.

AFR 374F • Diaspora Vision

30295 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 900am-1000am ART 2.208
(also listed as WGS 340 )
show description

Women's experiences in different cultures. Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history; these are identified in the Course Schedule.

AFR 374F • Introduction To African Art

30305 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm DFA 2.204
(also listed as WGS 340 )
show description

With the use of technical approaches and ideological positions that demonstrate the challenges and opportunities of femininity, black women in indigenous African societies have made important contributions to the arts of painting, ceramics, textiles, mixed media installations, and performance arts for hundreds of years. Their creativity continues into contemporary times in the works by women artists who combine international techniques, modern technologies, and feminist ideas to project individual and collective experiences.  By investigating analytical matters such as sexuality, class, religion, race, and ethnic  multiplicities, this course will investigate works by African women within the continent and also in the diasporas, including Europe, South America, the Caribbean, and North America.

AFR 374F • Introduction To African Art

35395 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm DFA 2.204
(also listed as WGS 340 )
show description

Women's experiences in different cultures. Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history; these are identified in the Course Schedule.

Prerequisite: Varies with the topic.

Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

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