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Cherise Smith, Ph.D, Director JES A232A, Mailcode D7200, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-1784

Matt Richardson

Associate Professor Ph.D., 2005, African Diaspora Studies and Emphasis in Women's and Gender Studies, University of California, Berkeley

Associate Professor of English and of African and African Diaspora Studies
Matt Richardson

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Biography

Matt Richardson is Associate Professor in English, the Center for African and African American Studies, and the Center for Women's and Gender Studies.  He holds a Ph.D. in African Diaspora Studies & Emphasis in Women's and Gender Studies from the University of California-Berkeley.  He has published articles in Sexuality Research and Social Policy: Journal of the NSRC and The Journal of Women’s History, as well as works of fiction in publications like Pharos and Does Your Mama Know: African American Coming Out Stories.  He received the Woodrow Wilson Fellowship National Fellowship for Junior Faculty and the Dean’s Fellowship in 2009.

AFR 372E • Black Queer Literature/Film

29735 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GEA 127
(also listed as E 376M, WGS 340 )
show description

E 376M  l  8-Black Queer Literature and Film

Instructor:  Richardson, M

Unique #:  34945

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  AFR 372E; WGS 340

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Flags:  Writing

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: In recent years the term “queer” has emerged as an identity and an analytical framework that focuses on non-normative ways of being. This seminar will combine elements of critical race theory to investigate the particular experiences and cultural production of Black people who are determined to be gender variant and different sexualities. We will analyze written works and films/videos by and about lesbians, bisexual, transgender and gay Black people. Emphasis will be on understanding the historical and theoretical construction of sexual and gender identities and sexual/cultural practices in Black communities. Special attention will be paid to the construction of race, gender and sexual identities in North America, the Caribbean and the United Kingdom.

Required Texts: Audre Lorde, Sister/Outsider; Jackie Kay, Trumpet; Melvin Dixon, Vanishing Rooms; Sharon Bridgforth, Love, Conjure, Blues; Films of Marlon Riggs, Isaac Julien and Cheryl Dunye.

Films: Even though these are films and not paper reading material, all films are required texts for the class.

Requirements & Grading: Attendance, 10%; Midterm, 20%; In-class Writing & Participation, 20%; Presentation/Paper, 20%; Final Paper, 30%.

AFR 388 • Feminist Theories

30657 • Fall 2014
Meets M 900am-1200pm PAR 310
(also listed as WGS 391 )
show description

Course Description:

This course introduces students to feminist theory as it intersects with race, nation, and sexuality. Since this is an introductory course, we will not explore feminist theory in all its incarnations. Rather than charting the historical development of a single body of knowledge called feminism, the class will read contemporary work by women that deals with questions of race, gender, transnationalism, and colonialism. Each week we will unpack one primary text with the intent of understanding the circumstances of its production, its significance, and how it can help us think about our own work.

Selected Texts:

Anzaldua, Gloria. "Borderlands, La Frontera: The New Mestiza." Third Edition, ed. San Francisco, CA: Aunt Lute Books, 1987.

Brown, Wendy. "States of Injury: Power and Freedom in Late Modernity." Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1995.

Lorde, Audre. "Sister/Outsider". Freedom: Crossing Press, 1984.

Puar, Jasbir K. "Terrorist Assemblages: Homonationalism in Queer Times". Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2007.

Sandoval, Chela. "Methodology of the Oppressed: Theory out of Bounds". Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, 2000.

Smith, Andrea. "Conquest: Sexual Violence and the American Indian Genocide". Cambridge, MA: South End Press, 2005.

 

AFR 317F • African American Lit And Cul

30620 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 304
(also listed as E 314V )
show description

Instructor:  Richardson, M

Unique #:  35230

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  AFR 317F

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This course will survey some of the foundational texts of African American literature of the mid-to-late 20th Century. Class is a particularly important part of departure for the course material, especially as it relates to race, gender and sexual identity. As this is a writing-intensive course, we will pay particular attention to the style as well as the content of our texts. Considerable attention will be placed on close textual analysis, writing and revising skills. Discussion will also play an integral role in the course.

Texts: Richard Wright, Native Son; James Baldwin, Notes of a Native Son; Ann Petry, The Street; Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man; Lorraine Hansberry, Raisin in the Sun; Ntozake Shange, For Colored Girls.

Requirements & Grading: 4 Short 1-pg Essays Based on Questions and Close Readings of Required Texts: 20%; 2 Short 3-pg Essays: 30%; Group Presentation and 4-pg paper: 20%; 8-10-pg Research Paper: 20%; Attendance and Participation: 10%.

AFR 372E • Contemp Afr Amer Women Fic

30690 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ 1.216
(also listed as E 376M, WGS 340 )
show description

Instructor:  Richardson, M

Unique #:  36190

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  AFR 374F, WGS 340

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: SPECULATIVE FICTION OF THE AFRICAN DIASPORA -- In this course, we will examine the novels and films of women of African descent produced from the 1970s to the present. We will focus on issues of imagination and the creation of spectacular images of the past and the future. This class gives special consideration to how African and African Diasporic spirituality is depicted in film and literature.  In this course, we will use the work of history and psychoanalytic theory, cultural, queer, and feminist theories to assist our exploration of these questions and issues.

Required Texts: Beloved by Toni Morrison; Fledgling and Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler; Erzulie’s Skirt by Ana-Marine Lara; Brown Girl in the Ring by Nalo Hopkinson; Course Reader.

Requirements & Grading: 4 Short 1-pg Essays Based on Questions and Close Readings of Required Texts: 30%; 2 Short 3-pg Essays: 30%; 8-10-pg Research Paper; 20%; Attendance and Participation: 20%.

AFR 372E • Afr Am Lit Thru Harl Renais

30390 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm GAR 2.112
(also listed as E 376R )
show description

Instructor:  Richardson, M            Areas:  II / G

Unique #:  35970            Flags:  Cultural diversity, Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AFR 372E            Computer Instruction:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course is a survey of major black writers in the context of slavery and its immediate aftermath from the eighteenth century and ending in the beginning of the twentieth century. The eighteenth century saw the inauguration of writing from enslaved Africans in America. Even from a condition of bondage, their work contributes to literary and intellectual debates about the nature and limitations of freedom, personhood and citizenship. We will begin by examining issues of gender and sexuality from the perspectives of slaves and freed people. Throughout the course, we will view films and documentaries that illuminate this period of African American culture and history. We will also examine works by African American authors writing a generation after slavery as they look back to slavery in order to imagine the future of African Americans.

Texts: Henry Bibb: Narrative of the life and adventures of Henry Bib; Olaudah Equiano: The Interesting Narrative and Other Writings; David Walker: Appeal to the Coloured Citizens of the World; Frederick Douglass: Narrative of the Life; Harriet Jacobs: Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Frances Ellen Watkins Harper: Iola Leroy; Charles Chesnutt: Marrow of Tradition; Nella Larsen: Quicksand and Passing.

Requirements & Grading: Two Short Papers (4-6 pages each), 40%; Final Paper, 40%; Attendance, 10%; Participation, 10%.

AFR 372E • Black Queer Literature & Film

30320 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAR 303
(also listed as E 376M, WGS 340 )
show description

Instructor:  Richardson, M            Areas:  V / G

Unique #:  35670            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AFR 372E; WGS 340            Computer Instruction:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: In recent years the term “queer” has emerged as an identity and an analytical framework that focuses on non-normative ways of being. This seminar will combine elements of critical race theory to investigate the particular experiences and cultural production of Black people who are determined to be gender variant and different sexualities. We will analyze written works and films/videos by and about lesbians, bisexual, transgender and gay Black people. Emphasis will be on understanding the historical and theoretical construction of sexual and gender identities and sexual/cultural practices in Black communities. Special attention will be paid to the construction of race, gender and sexual identities in North America, the Caribbean and the United Kingdom.

Required Texts: Audre Lorde, Sister/Outsider; Jackie Kay, Trumpet; Melvin Dixon, Vanishing Rooms; Sharon Bridgforth, Love, Conjure, Blues; Tim’m West, Red Dirt Revival; Films of Marlon Riggs, Isaac Julien and Cheryl Dunye.

Films: Even though these are films and not paper reading material, all films are required texts for the class.

Requirements & Grading: Attendance, 10%; Midterm, 20%; In-class Writing & Participation, 20%; Presentation/Paper, 20%; Final Paper, 30%.

AFR 374F • Contemp Afr Amer Women's Fict

30430 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm MEZ 1.216
(also listed as E 376M, WGS 340 )
show description

Instructor:  Richardson, M            Areas:  III / G

Unique #:  35675            Flags:  Cultural diversity; Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AFR 374F, WGS 340            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: SPECULATIVE FICTION OF THE AFRICAN DIASPORA -- In this course, we will examine the novels and films of women of African descent produced from the 1970s to the present. We will focus on issues of imagination and the creation of spectacular images of the past and the future. Considering the past violence and violations suffered under systems of racism, misogyny, and homophobia, what would a utopia or a dystopia look like? How does collective experiences of trauma influence our visions of utopia? In this course, we will use the work of history and psychoanalytic theory, cultural, queer, and feminist theories to assist our exploration of these questions and issues.

Required Texts: Beloved by Toni Morrison; Fledgling and Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler; Erzulie’s Skirt by Ana-Marine Lara; Brown Girl in the Ring by Nalo Hopkinson; Course Reader.

Requirements & Grading: 4 Short 1-pg Essays Based on Questions and Close Readings of Required Texts: 30%; 2 Short 3-pg Essays: 30%; 8-10-pg Research Paper; 20%; Attendance and Participation: 20%.

AFR 372E • Afr Am Lit Thru Harlem Renais

30320 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 300pm-430pm PAR 303
(also listed as E 376R )
show description

Instructor:  Richardson, M            Areas:  II / G

Unique #:  35670            Flags:  Cultural diversity, Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AFR 372E            Computer Instruction:  n/a

Only one of the following may be counted: AFR 374 (Topic 2: African American Literature through the Harlem Renaissance), 374F (Topic 1: African American Literature through the Harlem Renaissance), E 376R.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The eighteenth century saw the inauguration of writing from enslaved Africans in America. Even from a condition of bondage, their work contributes to literary and intellectual debates about the nature and limitations of freedom, personhood and citizenship. We will begin by examining issues of gender and sexuality from the perspectives of slaves and freed people. We will also examine works by African American authors writing a generation after slavery as they look back to slavery in order to imagine the future of African Americans. This course is a survey of major black writers in the context of slavery and its immediate aftermath from the eighteenth century and ending in the beginning of the twentieth century. Throughout the course, we will view films and documentaries that illuminate this period of African American culture and history.

Texts: Henry Bibb: Narrative of the life and adventures of Henry Bib; Olaudah Equiano: The Interesting Narrative and Other Writings; David Walker: Appeal to the Coloured Citizens of the World; Frederick Douglass: Narrative of the Life; Harriet Jacobs: Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Frances Ellen Watkins Harper: Iola Leroy; Charles Chesnutt: Marrow of Tradition; Nella Larsen: Quicksand and Passing.

Requirements & Grading: Two Short Papers (4-6 pages each), 40%; Final Paper, 40%; Attendance, 10%; Participation, 10%.

AFR 381 • Black Subjectivity

30415 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 100pm-230pm CAL 419
(also listed as E 397N, WGS 393 )
show description

The initiation of the trans-Atlantic slave trade created great debate among philosophers, politicians and scientists concerning the question of African humanity. This course examines the historical antecedents to contemporary anti-Black racism. Looking at 18th Century philosophy, 19th Century comparative anatomy, slave narratives and recent scholarship such as critical race theory and psychoanalysis, we will explore the impact of the condition of slavery on the denial of Black subjectivity. As well, we will discuss whether and how Black experiences in the Americas index an incommensurable condition relative to other non-white racialized social groups. Can we locate a deep singularity defining Black experiences, at once connected to but immanently distinct than those of other groups?

AFR 374F • Black Queer Literature & Film

30520 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 101
(also listed as E 376M, WGS 340 )
show description

Instructor:  Richardson, M            Areas:  V / G

Unique #:  35465            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AFR 374F; WGS 340            Computer Instruction:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: In recent years the term “queer” has emerged as an identity and an analytical framework that focuses on non-normative ways of being. This seminar will combine elements of critical race theory to investigate the particular experiences and cultural production of Black people who are determined to be gender variant and different sexualities. We will analyze written works and films/videos by and about lesbians, bisexual, transgender and gay Black people. Emphasis will be on understanding the historical and theoretical construction of sexual and gender identities and sexual/cultural practices in Black communities. Special attention will be paid to the construction of race, gender and sexual identities in North America, the Caribbean and the United Kingdom.

Required Texts: Audre Lorde, Sister/Outsider; Jackie Kay, Trumpet; Melvin Dixon, Vanishing Rooms; Sharon Bridgforth, Love, Conjure, Blues; Tim’m West, Red Dirt Revival; Films of Marlon Riggs, Isaac Julien and Cheryl Dunye.

Films: Even though these are films and not paper reading material, all films are required texts for the class.

Requiremets & Grading: Attendance, 10%; Midterm, 20%; In-class Writing & Participation, 20%; Presentation/Paper, 20%; Final Paper, 30%.

AFR 374F • Contemp Afr Amer Women's Fict

30525 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 204
(also listed as E 376M, WGS 340 )
show description

Instructor:  Richardson, M            Areas:  III / G

Unique #:  35470            Flags:  Writing; Cultural Diversity

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AFR 374F, WGS 340            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: SPECULATIVE FICTION OF THE AFRICAN DIASPORA -- In this course, we will examine the novels and films of women of African descent produced from the 1970s to the present. We will focus on issues of imagination and the creation of spectacular images of the past and the future. Considering the past violence and violations suffered under systems of racism, misogyny, and homophobia, what would a utopia or a dystopia look like? How does collective experiences of trauma influence our visions of utopia? In this course, we will use the work of history and psychoanalytic theory, cultural, queer, and feminist theories to assist our exploration of these questions and issues.

Required Texts: Beloved by Toni Morrison; Fledgling and Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler; Erzulie’s Skirt by Ana-Marine Lara; Brown Girl in the Ring by Nalo Hopkinson; Course Reader.

Requirements & Grading: 4 Short 1-pg Essays Based on Questions and Close Readings of Required Texts: 30%; 2 Short 3-pg Essays: 30%; 8-10-pg Research Paper; 20%; Attendance and Participation: 20%.

AFR 381 • Black Feminist Theory

30337 • Fall 2011
Meets T 500pm-800pm PAR 302
(also listed as E 389P, WGS 393 )
show description

Black Feminist Theory

Black feminist theory constitutes a distinctive body of politics and thought, produced primarily by black women scholars, artist and activists, in various parts of the African Diaspora. This is a theory and methodology course. We will analyze black feminisms both as political space and scholarly choice. This framework will enable us to examine the continuities between black feminist theories in diverse locations, as well as to explore how different embodied experiences—including histories, geographies and genealogies-- condition divergent perspectives.Themes explored will include slavery, colonialism, diaspora consciousness, multiple genders and sexualities in Black cultures and communities, and class difference and inequities of power within Black communities;‘ womanism’; global and Third World feminisms; representation in popular culture; poetics and resistance. The class will be conducted using trans-disciplinary perspectives including anthropology, history, sociology, literature and film.  We will challenge notions of “theory” as the province of the West [and North] and the middle-class.  This course finds theory in literature, activism, art, ethnography and everyday life. This course is not meant to be an exhaustive reading list, but merely a starting point from which students can build upon in their annotated bibliographies and their seminar papers.

AFR S317F • Afr Am In Amer Cin, 1970s-Pres

81560 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm MEZ 2.122
(also listed as WGS S301 )
show description

African Americans in American Cinema, 1970's to Today.

This course is a survey of the representation of Black masculinity from the 1970's exploitation film genre through the contemporary independent films by Black people. We will discuss issues of race and racism, sexuality and homophobia as well as misogyny and sexism in Black representation. Students will be expected to watch and discuss films as well as read scholarly articles on race theory, feminist theory and cultural criticism.

AFR S374F • Contemp Afr Amer Women's Fict

81585 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am PAR 105
(also listed as E S376M, WGS S340 )
show description

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: SPECULATIVE FICTION OF THE AFRICAN DIASPORA -- In this course, we will examine the novels and films of women of African descent produced from the 1970s to the present. We will focus on issues of imagination and the creation of spectacular images of the past and the future. Considering the past violence and violations suffered under systems of racism, misogyny and homophobia, what would a utopia or a dystopia look like? How does collective experiences of trauma effect our visions of utopia? In this course, we will use the work of history and psychoanalytic, cultural, queer and feminist theories to assist our exploration of these questions and issues.

 

Possible Texts: Beloved by Toni Morrison; Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler; Erzulie’s Skirt by Ana-Marine Lara; Brown Girl in the Ring by Nalo Hopkinson.

 

Requirements & Grading: 2 Short 3-pg Essays: 40%; 8-10-pg Research Paper; 30%; Attendance and Participation: 30%.

AFR 317F • African American Lit And Cul

30435 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAR 304
(also listed as E 314V )
show description

This course will survey some of the foundational texts of African American literature of the mid-to-late 20th Century. We will consider themes of race, gender, and sexual identity in all material. As this is a writing-intensive course, we will pay particular attention to the style as well as the content of our texts.  Considerable attention will be placed on close textual analysis, writing and revising skills. Discussion will also play an integral role in the course.

AFR 374F • Contemp Afr Amer Women's Fict

30580 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 900am-1000am PAR 204
(also listed as E 376M, WGS 340 )
show description

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: SPECULATIVE FICTION OF THE AFRICAN DIASPORA --In this course, we will examine the novels and films of women of African descent produced from the 1970s to the present. We will focus on issues of imagination and the creation of spectacular images of the past and the future. Considering the past violence and violations suffered under systems of racism, misogyny and homophobia, what would a utopia or a dystopia look like? How does collective experiences of trauma effect our visions of utopia? In this course, we will use the work of history and psychoanalytic, cultural, queer and feminist theories to assist our exploration of these questions and issues.

Possible Texts: Beloved by Toni Morrison; Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler; Erzulie’s Skirt by Ana-Marine Lara; Brown Girl in the Ring by Nalo Hopkinson.

Requirements & Grading: 4 Short 1-pg Essays Based on Questions and Close Readings of Required Texts: 20%; 2 Short 3-pg Essays: 30%; Group Presentation and 4-pg paper: 20%; 8-10-pg Research Paper; 20%; Attendance and Participation: 10%.

AFR 374F • Afr Am Lit Thru Harlem Renais

35430 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 105
(also listed as E 376R )
show description

Cross-listed with AFR 374

Only one of the following may be counted: AFR 374 (Topic 2: African American Literature through the Harlem Renaissance), E 376R, 376M (Topic 1: African American Literature through the Harlem Renaissance).

Course Description: The eighteenth century saw the inauguration of writing from enslaved Africans in America. Even from a condition of bondage, their work contributes to literary and intellectual debates about the nature and limitations of freedom, personhood and citizenship. We will begin by examining issues of gender and sexuality from the perspectives of slaves and freed people. We will also examine works by African American authors writing a generation after slavery as they look back to slavery in order to imagine the future of African Americans. This course is a survey of major black writers in the context of slavery and its immediate aftermath. Throughout the course, we will view films and documentaries that illuminate this period of African American culture and history.

Texts: Henry Bibb: Narrative of the life and adventures of Henry Bib; Olaudah Equiano: The Interesting Narrative and Other Writings; David Walker: Appeal to the Coloured Citizens of the World; Frederick Douglass: Narrative of the Life; Harriet Jacobs: Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Frances Ellen Watkins Harper: Iola Leroy; Charles Chesnutt: Marrow of Tradition; Nella Larsen: Quicksand and Passing.

Grading: Two Short Papers (4-6 pages each), 40%; Final Paper, 40%; Attendance, 10%; Participation, 10%.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

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