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Domino R. Perez, Director BUR 552, Mailcode F9200, Austin, TX 78712 • (512) 471-4557

Anne M. Martínez

Assistant Professor Ph.D., University of Minnesota

Anne M. Martínez

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 475-7268
  • Office: GAR 3.214
  • Office Hours: Spring 2013, Tuesday, 3:30-5:30 and by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

Biography

Research interests

Professor Martínez is interested in the role of religion in interactions between the United States and Mexico during and immediately after the Mexican Revolution, as well as Mexican migration to the Midwest during that time period. Her work examines the relationships among race, religion and nationalism for Mexicans in both the United States and Mexico.

Professor Martínez's forthcoming book, Catholic Borderlands: Mapping Catholicism into U.S. Empire, 1905-1935 (University of Nebraska Press, 2014), considers how Mexico's religious crisis during and after the Mexican Revolution shaped American Catholicism. This cultural, diplomatic, and intellectual history sets the stage for her second book project, The Outsourcing of Souls, a social history of Black and Mexican Catholics in Chicago from 1910 to the beginning of World War II.

Her second book project, The Outsourcing of Souls compares Black and Mexican Catholics in Chicago from 1910 to the beginning of World War II.

Courses taught

Mexican American cultural, intellectual and social histories; emphasis on race, gender and citizenship through a transnational lens; U.S. Catholic history

Awards/Honors

Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture, University of Chicago (2004-05)

College Research Fellow, College of Liberal Arts, University of Texas (2012-13)

Interests

Religion; U.S.-Mexico Relations; and Race, Labor and Religion within the Mexican-origin community in Chicago in the first half of the Twentieth-Century

MAS 316 • History Of Mexican Amers In Us

36625 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 330pm-500pm JGB 2.324
(also listed as HIS 314K )
show description

This course examines the history of Mexicans/Mexican Americans/Chicana/os in the United States from the U.S.-Mexican conflict in what is now the southwestern United States to the present. We will attempt to understand the past through an interdisciplinary lens – through art, literature, film, poetry, geography, economics and revisionist histories. We will focus on understanding how these histories influence contemporary Chicano/Chicana life and experience.

 

Required Materials

Aida Barrera, Looking for Carrascolendas

Vicki L. Ruiz, From Out of the Shadows

A packet of required readings will available at Jenn’s on Guadalupe at Dean Keaton.

A few required readings will be available on Blackboard.

 

Grading

 

Short (5-7 pages) papers will account for 60% of your final grade. Quizzes and class participation will make up the remaining 40% of the final grade.

 

MAS 374 • Us Catholic History

36694 • Spring 2014
Meets TH 330pm-630pm GAR 2.128
(also listed as AMS 321, HIS 365G, R S 346 )
show description

This course examines the experiences of Catholic in the United States, with an emphasis on the twentieth century. We will examine how Catholicism and national identity work for U.S. Catholics, with an emphasis on Catholic women and Latina/os.

Texts:

Books TBA

Course packet

Grading:

75% of grade will be based on writing

25% of grade will be based on attendance and participation

MAS 319 • Mexican Amer Women, 1910-Pres

36483 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 330pm-500pm GAR 0.102
(also listed as HIS 317L, WGS 301 )
show description

This course examines the history of Mexican women in the United States in the twentieth century. Starting with the Mexican Revolution, which led to the first significant migration of Mexicans to the United States, we will look at lives and roles of Mexican and Mexican American women in this country and along the U.S.-Mexico border. We will explore how race, gender, class and religion shape the experience of Mexican American women, and how the writing of their history has changed in the last one hundred years.

 

Texts:

Vicki L. Ruiz, From Out of the Shadows (Oxford)

W. K. Stratton with Anissa Zamarron, Boxing Shadows (Texas)

A packet of required readings is available at Jenn’s on Guadalupe at Dean Keeton.

Additional required readings are available on Blackboard.

 

MAS 374 • Race & Citizenship In Us Hist

36524 • Fall 2013
Meets T 330pm-630pm GAR 1.134
(also listed as AMS 370, HIS 350R )
show description

Race has been key in defining citizenship since the founding of the United States of America. From the earliest treaties with Indians to the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, the Jones Act, the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, race has outweighed citizenship in determining the rights of individuals in this country. In this course we will use primary and secondary sources to analyze how race and citizenship have functioned for populations of color in the United States. We will examine events in U.S. history and consider how citizenship impacts the histories of various groups as well as the writing of their histories

Texts:

The Possessive Investment in Whiteness, George Lipsitz

A packet of required readings will be available at Jenn’s on Guadalupe at Dean Keaton.

A few required readings will be available on Blackboard.

The bulk of the reading for this course will be from materials you collect for your research project.

Additional readings to be determined.

Grading:

This has been designated and designed as a writing-intensive course. As such, writing will be a significant part of the workload for this course, and the bulk of your grade will be determined by your writing.

The final paper will count for 50% of the final grade. Class participation will count for 20% of your final grade. The remaining thirty percent will be based on shorter writing assignments.

MAS 316 • History Of Mexican Amers In Us

36145 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 330pm-500pm JGB 2.324
(also listed as HIS 314K )
show description

This course examines the history of Mexicans/Mexican Americans/Chicana/os in the United States from the U.S.-Mexican conflict in what is now the southwestern United States to the present. We will attempt to understand the past through an interdisciplinary lens – through art, literature, film, poetry, geography, economics and revisionist histories. We will focus on understanding how these histories influence contemporary Chicano/Chicana life and experience.

 

Required Materials

Aida Barrera, Looking for Carrascolendas

Vicki L. Ruiz, From Out of the Shadows

A packet of required readings will available at Jenn’s on Guadalupe at Dean Keaton.

A few required readings will be available on Blackboard.

 

Grading

Short (5-7 pages) papers will account for 80% of your final grade. Quizzes and class participation will make up the remaining 20% of the final grade.

MAS 392 • Religion In The Borderlands

36260 • Spring 2013
Meets T 1230pm-330pm UTC 4.114
(also listed as HIS 389, R S 392T )
show description

This course is designed for graduate students to conduct research and prepare a paper in their area of interest on broad questions of religion, ethnicity/race, gender, class, sexuality, citizenship, and transnational identity in global context. More specifically, the course is designed for students from a range of disciplinary backgrounds to explore the ways in which religious, spiritual, national and transnational identities shape and are shaped by changing concepts of citizenship, patterns of global migration, postcolonialism, as well as race, class, and gender formations. In the past students have chosen topics on religion and/or spirituality in the U.S., Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. Students prepare a 25-30 page research paper based on a topic of their choosing, preferably one related to their thesis or dissertation projects. Students will also write short response papers to and lead discussion of readings during the semester. We will workshop student papers during the last week or two of class.

 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

 

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary

MAS 316 • History Of Mexican Amers In Us

35985 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 330pm-500pm BUR 116
(also listed as HIS 314K )
show description

This course examines the history of Mexicans/Mexican Americans/Chicana/os in the United States from the U.S.-Mexican conflict in what is now the southwestern United States to the present. We will attempt to understand the past through an interdisciplinary lens – through art, literature, film, poetry,geography, economics and revisionist histories. We will focus on understanding how these histories influence contemporary Mexican/Mexican American/Chicana/o life and experience. 

This course carries the flag for Cultural Diversity in the United States. Cultural Diversity courses are designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization. 

 

Required Materials

Américo Paredes, George Washington Gómez 

Vicki L. Ruiz, From Out of the Shadows 

i>clicker 

2 bluebooks (more if you write large)

A packet of required readings is available at Jenn’s on Guadalupe at Dean Keaton.

A few required readings will be available on Blackboard.

One copy of each book is on reserve at the Perry Castañeda Library. 

 

Grading

Essays: two essays, 15% each

Exams: two exams, 15% each

daily attendance: 5%

daily participation: 20%

quizzes (as needed): 15%

MAS 374 • Us Catholic History

36060 • Spring 2012
Meets T 330pm-630pm GAR 2.128
(also listed as AMS 321, HIS 365G, R S 346 )
show description

This course will examine the history of Catholics and Catholicism in the United States with an emphasis on the twentieth century. We will examine relationships between immigration, race, labor, politics, devotionalism and religion, with some focus on Mexican Americans and how they have shaped the U.S. Catholic Church in the late twentieth century.

 

Required Readings

Lara Medina, Las Hermanas

Kathleen Sprow Cummings, New Women of the Old Faith

A required packet of readings will be available locally.

Other readings to be determined.

 

Class Format

Approximate use of class time: 40% lecture, 40% discussion and working groups, 20% writing. There will be four major writing assignments. Attendance is required. There is no final exam in this class.

MAS 319 • Mexican Amer Women, 1910-Pres

35985 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GAR 0.102
(also listed as HIS 317L, WGS 301 )
show description

This course examines the history of Mexican women in the United States. Starting with the Mexican Revolution, which led to the first significant migration of Mexicans to the United States, we will look at lives and roles of Mexican and Mexican American women in this country. In addition, we will consider women's lives along the U.S.-Mexico border in the twenty-first century. We will explore how race, gender, class and religion shape the experiences of Mexican American women, and how the writing of their history has changed in the last one hundred years. Students will be expected to think critically about a range of sources, including primary documents, and to incorporate that thinking into writing about assigned topics in the course. 

Texts

Alma García, editor, Chicana Feminist Thought

Vicki L. Ruiz, From Out of the Shadows

A packet of required readings is available at Jenn’s on Guadalupe at Dean Keeton.

Additional required readings are available on Blackboard.

Grading

Essays 60%

Quizzes  20%

Attendance and participation  20%

 

This course partially fulfills the legislative requirement for American history. 

MAS 374 • Race & Citizenship In Us Hist

36028 • Fall 2011
Meets W 300pm-600pm GAR 0.128
(also listed as AMS 370, HIS 350R )
show description

Race has been key in defining citizenship since the founding of the United States of America. From the earliest treaties with Indians to the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, the Jones Act, the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, race has outweighed citizenship in determining the rights of individuals in this country. In this course we will use primary and secondary sources to analyze how race and citizenship have functioned for populations of color in the United States. We will examine events in U.S. history and consider how citizenship impacts the histories of various groups as well as the writing of their histories.

 

Readings

Unequal Freedom, Evelyn Nakano Glenn 

The Possessive Investment in Whiteness, George Lipsitz

A packet of required readings will be available at Jenn’s on Guadalupe at Dean Keaton. 

A few required readings will be available on Blackboard.

The bulk of the reading for this course will be from materials you collect for your research project.

 

Grading

This has been designated and designed as a writing-intensive course. As such, writing will be a significant part of the workload for this course, and the bulk of your grade will be determined by your writing. 

The final paper will count for 50% of the final grade. Class participation will count for 20% of your final grade. The remaining 30%  percent will be based on shorter writing assignments.

 

This course partially fulfills the legislative requirement for American history. 

MAS 316 • History Of Mexican Amers In Us

36265 • Spring 2011
Meets MW 330pm-500pm BEL 328
(also listed as HIS 314K )
show description

This course examines the history of Mexicans/Mexican Americans/Chicana/os in the United States from the U.S.-Mexican conflict in what is now the southwestern United States to the present. We will attempt to understand the past through an interdisciplinary lens – through art, literature, film, poetry, geography, economics and revisionist histories. We will focus on understanding how these histories influence contemporary Chicano/Chicana life and experience.

MAS 319 • Mexican Amer Women, 1910-Pres

35755 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 330pm-500pm GAR 0.102
(also listed as HIS 317L, WGS 301 )
show description

Mexican American Women, 1910-Present
HIS 317L/MAS 319/WGS 301
(39115/15755/47020)

Professor Anne M. Martínez

 

Teaching Assistant                                                Teaching Assistant
Brenda Beza                                                            Amanda Gray


The best way to reach us between classes is by e-mail.

 

Course Description

This course examines the history of Mexican women in the United States in the twentieth century. Starting with the Mexican Revolution, which led to the first significant migration of Mexicans to the United States, we will look at lives and roles of Mexican and Mexican American women in this country and along the U.S.-Mexico border. We will explore how race, gender, class and religion shape the experience of Mexican American women, and how the writing of their history has changed in the last one hundred years.

 

Learning Objectives

Over the course of the semester, you will learn how, when and why Mexican and U.S. histories intersect in the twentieth century, how women of Mexican descent in the United States have experienced migration, settlement and the establishment of their communities, and how the contemporary border shapes the lives of Mexican and Mexican American women. These objectives will be assessed through your written work and class participation.

 

Required Materials

Alma García, editor, Chicana Feminist Thought (Routledge)

Vicki L. Ruiz, From Out of the Shadows (Oxford)

A packet of required readings is available at Jenn’s on Guadalupe at Dean Keeton.

Additional required readings are available on Blackboard.

 

Class Environment

This class requires a good deal of reading, and thoughtful discussion of those readings. You are expected to show respect for and thoughtful consideration of issues discussed in class and the readings. We will work collaboratively throughout the semester to understand the complex issues raised by the readings and in-class activities. Class time (lectures, discussions, activities) is intended to complement the readings. As such, attendance is required.

 

Policies and Procedures

Grading: A grade of C denotes basic fulfillment of all course requirements. A and B grades are given for original work that exceeds the course requirements, with an A denoting outstanding achievement. A grade of D will be given to work that attempts to meet the requirements but misses specified details. Work that does not fulfill the requirements of the course will be graded F. Plus and minus grades will be issued for this course. An 87 must be earned for a B+, an 83 will designate a B-, and so on. No incompletes will be given in this course. Any act of scholastic dishonesty will result in an F for the course and referral to Student Judicial Services.

 

Your grade for this course will be based on the following:

Assignment            Dates (subject to change)                           % of grade

Essays                      9/29, 11/10, 12/1                                    60

Quizzes                               as needed                                                 20

Attendance and participation            daily                     20

 

Essays: Essays are due at the start of class. You will respond to a question, quote, or idea that addresses some major event or theme discussed in the course, drawing on course readings, films and lectures. Essay topics and requirements will be distributed at least one week before the due date. Essays will be 1200-1300 words each.

 

Quizzes: Quizzes will be given periodically throughout the semester. Students who attend class regularly, pay rapt attention, and keep up with the readings should do well on quizzes.

 

Attendance and participation: Class discussions will be a significant part of the course. Therefore, attendance and participation are required. You are expected to be on time for class. If you are consistently late or leave class early, this will affect your final course grade. There will be in-class assignments, discussions and other activities that will require your participation. These activities and the credit associated with them cannot be made up. It is your responsibility to sign-in on a daily basis. Under no circumstances should you sign in for another student. Any students involved in such questionable behavior will be considered absent for all days in question. I work from day one to create an environment that is open to and welcoming of your participation. I encourage you to participate during class sessions with relevant questions and comments about the readings, lectures and films. If you are not comfortable speaking in class, think about other ways to engage the material. For example, you may e-mail me a link to a relevant article on-line, or visit during office hours to discuss readings and assignments.

 

Academic Dishonesty: Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating on assignments or examinations; plagiarizing, which means misrepresenting as your own work any part of work done by another; submitting the same paper, or substantially similar papers, to meet requirements of more than one course without the approval and consent of all instructors concerned; depriving another student of necessary course materials; or interfering with another student’s work. Any act of academic dishonesty will result in an F for the course and referral to Student Judicial Services.

 

Appropriate Accommodation: Accommodations will be provided for students with disabilities that have been documented by the Services for Students with Disabilities (http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/). If you have a disability requiring accommodation in this class, please notify me and provide SSD documentation at the beginning of the course. Appropriate accommodation takes time and planning.

 

Religious Holy Days: According to UT policy, you must notify me of your pending absence at least 14 days prior to the date of observance of a religious holy day. If you must miss a class or assignment to observe a religious holy day, you will be given an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

 

Course Schedule

(subject to change)

Introduction to the course

8/25            Introduction to the course, terms

 

Mexican Revolution and Migration
8/30 Salas
9/1 Ruiz
9/6 Labor Day, No class
9/8 Ruiz
9/13 Ruiz

 

The Great Depression and Mexican Repatriation
9/15   Vargas
9/20   Repatriation Documents
9/22   Orozco
          Last day to drop class without academic penalty

9/27   Ruiz
9/29 Essay 1 due

 

World War II and the Cold War

10/4 WWII Oral History Narratives, WWII Documents
10/6 Lorence
10/11 Salt Documents

 

Chicanas and the Chicano Movement

10/13 Ruiz
10/18 Ruiz
10/20 García
10/25 Gonzáles, Camarillo
10/27 García
11/1 Trujillo, Chávez Leyva
11/3 García
11/8 García
11/10 Essay 2 due

 

Gender, Migration and Labor

11/15 Amnesty International
11/17 Arriola, Border Documents
11/22 Kamel and Hoffman
11/24 TBA
11/29 Soldatenko
12/1 Essay 3 due

 

There is no final in this class.

This syllabus meets the requirements of HB 2504. Additional information is available to enrolled students.

This course contains a Cultural Diversity flag.

MAS 392 • Indig/Transnatl/Bordrlnds Hist

35850 • Fall 2010
Meets W 1100am-200pm UTC 1.142
(also listed as HIS 389 )
show description

This course will consider borderlands and transnsational histories. We will read a broad
range of recent and classic works in Mexican American, American Indian and Mexican
studies. We will consider the challenges of working across and between national
historiographies. Students will strive to use broader conceptual frameworks of the
borderlands, specifically, and transnational histories, in general, to develop related
research projects.

Grading

Each student will lead one or more class discussion, submit a written analysis and
discussion questions of the readings for that week, and write a seminar paper on a topic
that will further his or her own research interests, related to borderlands history.

Texts

Gloria Anzaldúa, Borderlands/La Frontera.
Juliana Barr, Peace Came in the Form of a Woman: Indians and Spaniards in the Texas
Borderlands
.
Erika Bsumek, Indian-Made: Navajo Culture in the Marketplace, 1868-1940.
Brian Delay, War of a Thousand Deserts: Indian Raids and the U.S.-Mexican War.
Rosalinda Fregoso, MeXicana Encounters: The Making of Social Identities on the Borderlands.
Karl Jacoby, Shadows at Dawn: A Borderlands Massacre and the Violence of History.
Alejandro Lugo, Fragmented Lives, Assembled Parts: Culture, Capitalism and Conquest at the
U.S.-Mexico Border.

Salman Rushdie, Step Across This Line.
Samuel Truett and Elliott Young, eds., Continental Crossroads.
Other readings to be determined.

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