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Lorraine and Tom Pangle, Co-Directors BAT 2.116, C4100, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-6648

James M. Vaughn

Assistant Professor Ph.D., 2008, University of Chicago

CTI 375 • Enlightenment & Revolution

33385 • Spring 2015
Meets M 600pm-900pm GAR 1.134
(also listed as EUS 346, HIS 350L )
show description

This seminar course examines the relationship between the intellectual project of the Enlightenment and the political and social transformations that unfolded in western Europe and North America from the beginnings of the Dutch Revolt in the 1560s to the decade following the Paris Commune of 1871.  What was the connection between intellectual enlightenment and social-political revolution in the West?  The central theme of the course is the contemporary intellectual comprehension of far-reaching social, political, and economic change.  The seminar sessions involve close readings and extensive discussions of the writings of major European intellectuals who sought to understand, analyze, and criticize the upheavals and transformations taking place around them.  Authors read and discussed include Hugo Grotius, René Descartes, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Bernard Mandeville, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Adam Smith, Immanuel Kant, Benjamin Constant, G. W. F. Hegel, John Stuart Mill, and Karl Marx.

 

Texts:

René Descartes, Discourse on Method and Meditations on First Philosophy (Hackett, 2011).

John Locke, Political Writings (Hackett, 2003).

Bernard Mandeville, The Fable of the Bees and Other Writings (Hackett, 1997).

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, The Basic Political Writings (Hackett, 1987).

Adam Smith, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (Univ. Chicago Press, 1977).

Immanuel Kant, Perpetual Peace and Other Essays (Hackett, 1983).

Benjamin Constant, Political Writings (Cambridge Univ. Press, 1988).

G. W. F. Hegel, Introduction to the Philosophy of History (Hackett, 1988).

Robert C. Tucker, ed., The Marx-Engels Reader (W. W. Norton, 1978).

 

Grading:

1. Class attendance and participation – 30% of final grade.

2. Weekly reading responses – 20% of final grade.

3. Mid-term analytical essay – 20% of final grade.

4. Final analytical essay – 30% of final grade.

CTI 375 • Enlightenment And Revolution

34258 • Fall 2013
Meets TH 600pm-900pm GAR 1.134
(also listed as EUS 346, HIS 350L )
show description

This seminar course examines the relationship between the intellectual project of the Enlightenment and the political and social transformations that unfolded in western Europe and North America from the beginnings of the Dutch Revolt in the 1560s to the decade following the Paris Commune of 1871.  What was the connection between intellectual enlightenment and social-political revolution in the West?  The central theme of the course is the contemporary intellectual comprehension of far-reaching social, political, and economic change.  The seminar sessions involve close readings and extensive discussions of the writings of major European intellectuals who sought to understand, analyze, and criticize the upheavals and transformations taking place around them.  Authors read and discussed include Hugo Grotius, René Descartes, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Bernard Mandeville, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Adam Smith, Immanuel Kant, Benjamin Constant, G. W. F. Hegel, John Stuart Mill, and Karl Marx.

 

Texts:

René Descartes, Discourse on Method and Meditations on First Philosophy (Hackett, 2011).

John Locke, Political Writings (Hackett, 2003).

Bernard Mandeville, The Fable of the Bees and Other Writings (Hackett, 1997).

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, The Basic Political Writings (Hackett, 1987).

Adam Smith, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (Univ. Chicago Press, 1977).

Immanuel Kant, Perpetual Peace and Other Essays (Hackett, 1983).

Benjamin Constant, Political Writings (Cambridge Univ. Press, 1988).

G. W. F. Hegel, Introduction to the Philosophy of History (Hackett, 1988).

Robert C. Tucker, ed., The Marx-Engels Reader (W. W. Norton, 1978).

 

Grading:

1. Class attendance and participation – 30% of final grade.

2. Weekly reading responses – 20% of final grade.

3. Mid-term analytical essay – 20% of final grade.

4. Final analytical essay – 30% of final grade.

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