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Lorraine and Tom Pangle, Co-Directors BAT 2.116, C4100, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-6648

Mark Regnerus

Associate Professor Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Associate Professor of Sociology
Mark Regnerus

Contact

Biography

Mark Regnerus is an associate professor of sociology at the University of Texas at Austin (PhD, 2000, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) and a faculty associate at the university’s Population Research Center. Author of over 30 published articles and book chapters, his research is in the areas of sexual behavior, religion, and family. His book Premarital Sex in America: How Young Americans Meet, Mate, and Think about Marrying (Oxford, 2011) is available beginning in December 2010. His previous book Forbidden Fruit: Sex and Religion in the Lives of American Teenagers (Oxford University Press, 2007)tells the story of the sexual values and practices of American teenagers, paying particular attention to how participating in organized religion shapes sexual decision-making. Mark's research and opinion pieces have been featured in numerous media outlets in the US and elsewhere. Forbidden Fruit has been reviewed in Slate, the Dallas Morning News, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, and The New Yorker. His op-ed on marital timing norms appeared in the Washington Post on April 26, 2009.

NIH Biosketch

CTI 304 • Judaism/Christianity:soc Persp

34160 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BUR 216
(also listed as SOC 308 )
show description

Cross listed with CTI 304

 

Course Description

While a majority of Americans still identify as Christians, many know little about its historic roots in Judaism, about the texts that Jews and Christians share, about what Jews believe, how and why the two faiths diverged and evolved, how institutionalized Christianity addresses—or more aptly, fails to seriously consider—its Jewish origins, and about how Jews and Christians have gotten along throughout history. This course is an introduction to these themes, with particular attention paid to the social, historical, and intellectual contexts and forces which have shaped these processes up to the present day. Particular attention is paid to religious evolution—how systems and ways of thought and action change, why, and how Christians and Jews have dealt with such changes.

Contacting the instructor: The best way to reach me is by email at regnerus@prc.utexas.edu. In general the TA can answer most course-related technical questions. I enjoy personal and course material conversations, however, so please don’t hesitate to drop by during office hours or make an appointment.

Course Requirements: Final grade is determined as follows: Exam #1= 20%, Exam #2= 25%, Final Exam = 30%

5 quizzes worth 5% each=25%.

Lectures: Course lectures are on Mondays and Wednesdays, led by Dr. Regnerus. This is very important to state—there will be lots of material that will only be covered in class, and that will be on the three exams.

Exams: the three exams will consist of multiple choice and true/false questions, short answer questions, and perhaps an essay question. They are all closed book. The final exam (#3) is comprehensive; the other two cover their respective sections of the course. Please do not ask to take them at a time other than the scheduled date and time. The first exam will be administered on Wednesday, February 24, and the second exam will be administered on Wednesday, April 14. The final exam is comprehensive; its date will be announced when it becomes known. To prepare for them, first make sure that you understand the meaning and function of all of the terms and concepts covered in the unit that the exam tests. That is, you should be able both to define each concept accurately and to demonstrate how it is related to the rest of the material in that unit. Second, you should be able to use the specific content of the unit the exam tests to illustrate or illuminate the general themes developed in the course. When studying and note-taking, always distinguish the centrally important issue or argument in the reading or lecture from the less-important details, facts, and other data that are only meant to illustrate or support the central issue or argument. The danger of not doing so is treating all material as equally important, becoming overwhelmed with information, and failing to see and grasp the major point. It’s not that supporting details and illustrations are unimportant and can be disregarded, just that they should not be cognitively processed in a way that obscures the reading or lecture’s main argument. I give makeup exams only in what I consider extreme circumstances (e.g., hospitalization, death of a family member) and only if I am informed before the exam.

Quizzes: Five quizzes will be administered during the semester, approximately every two weeks. The quizzed will cover assigned readings since the last quiz (or exam). They will consist of 2-3 short essay questions simply designed to decipher whether the student has read the material. Each will count for five percent of the course grade. They are scheduled for five Wednesdays: Feb 3, Feb 17, March 10, March 31, and April 28.

Accommodations: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic adjustments for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities at (512) 471-6259. At the beginning of the semester, students who need special accommodations should notify me and present a letter prepared by the Services for Students with Disabilities Office.

Professor Profile: Dr. Regnerus received his PhD in Sociology in 2000 from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and has taught at UT since 2002. He also teaches an Intro-to-Sociology course (Soc 302) and occasionally research methods (Soc 317m). His published research concerns sexual decision- making, family formation, and the influence of religion on human behavior. His first book (assigned here) was published in 2007, entitled Forbidden Fruit: Sex and Religion in the Lives of American Teenagers. He is currently finishing a second book project, entitled Premarital Sex in America.

Required Readings:

The Source, by James Michener (Random House, 2002, although any edition will suffice).

Each student should have access to a good, modern version of the Bible (including the Apocrypha). The recommended versions are the New International Version (NIV), the Revised Standard Version (RSV), or the New Revised Standard Version (NRSV). A copy of the Tanakh (or Old Testament) published the Jewish Publication Society (New JPS) can also prove helpful. I will be using the NRSV for course purposes.

All other required readings will be posted on Blackboard.

WCV 303 • Judaism/Christianity:soc Persp

48205 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 330pm-500pm RLM 7.104
(also listed as SOC 308 )
show description

Course Description

While a majority of Americans still identify as Christians, many know little about its historic roots in Judaism, about the texts that Jews and Christians share, about what Jews believe, how and why the two faiths diverged and evolved, how institutionalized Christianity addresses—or more aptly, fails to seriously consider—its Jewish origins, and about how Jews and Christians have gotten along throughout history. This course is an introduction to these themes, with particular attention paid to the social, historical, and intellectual contexts and forces which have shaped these processes up to the present day. Particular attention is paid to religious evolution—how systems and ways of thought and action change, why, and how Christians and Jews have dealt with such changes.

Contacting the instructor: The best way to reach me is by email at regnerus@prc.utexas.edu. In general the TA can answer most course-related technical questions. I enjoy personal and course material conversations, however, so please don’t hesitate to drop by during office hours or make an appointment.

Course Requirements: Final grade is determined as follows: Exam #1= 20%, Exam #2= 25%, Final Exam = 30%

5 quizzes worth 5% each=25%.

Lectures: Course lectures are on Mondays and Wednesdays, led by Dr. Regnerus. This is very important to state—there will be lots of material that will only be covered in class, and that will be on the three exams.

Exams: the three exams will consist of multiple choice and true/false questions, short answer questions, and perhaps an essay question. They are all closed book. The final exam (#3) is comprehensive; the other two cover their respective sections of the course. Please do not ask to take them at a time other than the scheduled date and time. The first exam will be administered on Wednesday, February 24, and the second exam will be administered on Wednesday, April 14. The final exam is comprehensive; its date will be announced when it becomes known. To prepare for them, first make sure that you understand the meaning and function of all of the terms and concepts covered in the unit that the exam tests. That is, you should be able both to define each concept accurately and to demonstrate how it is related to the rest of the material in that unit. Second, you should be able to use the specific content of the unit the exam tests to illustrate or illuminate the general themes developed in the course. When studying and note-taking, always distinguish the centrally important issue or argument in the reading or lecture from the less-important details, facts, and other data that are only meant to illustrate or support the central issue or argument. The danger of not doing so is treating all material as equally important, becoming overwhelmed with information, and failing to see and grasp the major point. It’s not that supporting details and illustrations are unimportant and can be disregarded, just that they should not be cognitively processed in a way that obscures the reading or lecture’s main argument. I give makeup exams only in what I consider extreme circumstances (e.g., hospitalization, death of a family member) and only if I am informed before the exam.

Quizzes: Five quizzes will be administered during the semester, approximately every two weeks. The quizzed will cover assigned readings since the last quiz (or exam). They will consist of 2-3 short essay questions simply designed to decipher whether the student has read the material. Each will count for five percent of the course grade. They are scheduled for five Wednesdays: Feb 3, Feb 17, March 10, March 31, and April 28.

Accommodations: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic adjustments for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities at (512) 471-6259. At the beginning of the semester, students who need special accommodations should notify me and present a letter prepared by the Services for Students with Disabilities Office.

Professor Profile: Dr. Regnerus received his PhD in Sociology in 2000 from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and has taught at UT since 2002. He also teaches an Intro-to-Sociology course (Soc 302) and occasionally research methods (Soc 317m). His published research concerns sexual decision- making, family formation, and the influence of religion on human behavior. His first book (assigned here) was published in 2007, entitled Forbidden Fruit: Sex and Religion in the Lives of American Teenagers. He is currently finishing a second book project, entitled Premarital Sex in America.

Required Readings:

The Source, by James Michener (Random House, 2002, although any edition will suffice).

Each student should have access to a good, modern version of the Bible (including the Apocrypha). The recommended versions are the New International Version (NIV), the Revised Standard Version (RSV), or the New Revised Standard Version (NRSV). A copy of the Tanakh (or Old Testament) published the Jewish Publication Society (New JPS) can also prove helpful. I will be using the NRSV for course purposes.

All other required readings will be posted on Blackboard.

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