Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
cps masthead cps masthead
Wilson Geisler, Director SEA 4.328A, Mailcode A8000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5380

Max Snodderly

Professor

Max Snodderly

Contact

Biography

Dr. Snodderly's core interest is the study of vision. He does research on the effects of nutrition on the eye, with particular emphasis on the retina. He is interested in the effects of aging on visual function and the potential for nutrition to slow or to prevent age-related diseases such as cataract and macular degeneration. Together, these entities are the leading causes of blindness in the world and in the USA. Dr. Snodderly began his career with bachelor's and master's degrees from MIT in electrical engineering, followed by a doctorate in biology from the Rockefeller University and postdoctoral training in psychology at the University of California, Berkeley. He combines approaches from each of these disciplines in his research.

Publications

Gur, M., & Snodderly, D.M. (2006). High response reliability of neurons in primary visual cortex (V1) of alert, trained monkeys. Cerebral Cortex, 16, 888-895.

Mares, J.A., LaRowe, T.L., Snodderly, D.M., Moeller, S.M., Gruber, M.J., Klein, M.L., Wooten, B.R., Johnson, E.J., & Chappell, R.J. (2006). Predictors of optical density of lutein and zeaxanthin in retinas of older women in the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study, an ancillary study of the Women's Health Initiative. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 84, 1107-1122.

Stringham, J.M., Hammond, B.R., Wooten, B.R., & Snodderly, D.M. (2006). Compensation for light loss due to filtering by macular pigment: Relation to the -1 mechanism. Optometry and Vision Science, 83, 887-894.

Gur, M., Kagan, I., & Snodderly, D.M. (2005). Orientation and direction selectivity of neurons in V1 of alert monkeys: functional relationships and laminar distributions. Cerebral Cortex, 15, 1207-1221.

Johnson, E.J., Neuringer, M., Russell, R.M., Schalch, W., & Snodderly, D.M. (2005). Nutritional manipulation of primate retinas. III. Effects of lutein or zeaxanthin supplementation on adipose and retina of xanthophyll-free monkeys. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 46, 692-702.

Leung, I.Y.-F., Sandstrom, M.M., Zucker, C.L., Neuringer, M., & Snodderly, D.M. (2005). Nutritional manipulation of primate retinas. IV. Effects of n-3 fatty acids, lutein, and zeaxanthin on S-cones and rods in the foveal region. Experimental Eye Research, 81, 513-529.

Leung, I.Y.-F., Sandstrom, M.M., Zucker, C.L., Neuringer, M., & Snodderly, D.M. (2004). Nutritional manipulation of primate retinas, II. Effects of age, n-3 fatty acids, lutein, and zeaxanthin on retinal pigment epithelium. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 45, 3244-3256.

Snodderly, D.M., Mares, J.A., Wooten, B.R., Oxton, L., Gruber, M., & Ficek, T. (2004). Macular pigment measurement by heterochromatic flicker photometry in older subjects: the Carotenoids and Age-Related Eye Disease Study. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 45, 531-538.

Kagan, I., Gur, M., & Snodderly, D.M. (2002). Spatial organization of receptive fields of V1 neurons of alert monkeys: comparison with responses to gratings. Journal of Neurophysiology, 88, 2557-2574.

Snodderly, D.M., Kagan, I., & Gur, M. (2001). Selective activation of visual cortex neurons by fixational eye movements: Implications for neural coding. Vision Neuroscience, 18, 259-277.

Snodderly. D.M., & Hammond, B.R. (1999). In vivo psychophysical assessment of nutritional and environmental influences on human ocular tissues: Lens and macular pigment. In: A. Taylor (ed.), Nutritional and Environmental Influences on Vision (pp. 251-273). Boca Raton: CRC Press, 1999.

Snodderly, D.M. (1995). Evidence for protection against age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by carotenoids and antioxidant vitamins. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 62 (Suppl), 1448S-1461S.

Snodderly, D.M., & Gur, M. (1995). Organization of striate cortex (V1) of alert, trained monkeys (Macaca fascicularis): Ongoing activity, stimulus selectivity, and widths of receptive field activating regions. Journal of Neurophysiology, 74, 2100-2125.

Courses

 

bottom border