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Mary Neuburger, Director BUR 452, 2505 University Avenue, Stop F3600, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-3607

Marina Potoplyak

Lecturer PhD, UT Austin

Marina Potoplyak

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 471-3607
  • Office: BUR 466
  • Office Hours: Spring 2014: T/Th 12:30-­1:30pm, and by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: F3600

Interests

Russian Modernism, Russian Avant-Garde, Russian Pedagogy, Instructional Technology, Russian Food History

REE 325 • Russian Food Ways

45190 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am BUR 228
(also listed as RUS 330 )
show description

Explores the history and practice of food production and consumption in Russia and the former Soviet Union from historical, literary, and cultural points of view.  Using the methodology of food history, we will explore the restrictions, beliefs, etiquette, and taboos surrounding food and drink in Tsarist and Soviet Russia.  From Orthodox Church-mandated dietary restrictions and fasting through the Soviet cult of nutritious and abundant food to “deficit”-driven inventive dishes of the Perestroika period, the history of Russian food reflects the vicissitudes of political, social, economic, and even spiritual life.  Through a variety of historical and literary texts, we will explore the rich cultural context of Russian food and drinks and their role as an integral part of Russian national identity.

REE 325 • Lit & Art, Rus Mod, & Av-Gard

45510 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm GEA 127
(also listed as RUS 330 )
show description

Focusing on literary and artistic expressions of Russian modernist and avant-garde aesthetics, this course explores various responses to Russian cultural modernity between 1890s, when Russian Symbolists first published their works, and the Party decree of 1932 that established the Writers’ Union and outlawed all other artistic organizations.  Unfolding against the background of the revolutions and civil war in Russia, diverse manifestations of the spirit of modernity were captured by the aesthetics of Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes, Futurists’ shocking manifestos, socialist realist works, and avant-garde art movements like Constructivism and Malevich’s Suprematism, among others.  While reading critically both textual and non-textual works, we will constantly reference the unique socio-political and cultural context of the period locally and globally in order to create a panoramic vision of possibly the richest period in Russian culture.

Requirements:

Participation – 10%

Short response paper – 15%

Presentation – 15%

Two exams – 30%

Final paper or multimedia project – 30%

Texts:

Dmitry Merezhkovsky. On the Causes of the Decline and on the New Trends in Contemporary Russian Literature (1892) (Excerpts)

Alexandr Blok.  The Unknown Lady (1906)

A Slap in the Face of Public Face (1912)

Igor Stravinsky.  The Rite of Spring (1913)

Vladimir Mayakovsky.  A Cloud in Trousers (1915)

---. About That (1923)

Evgeny Zamiatin. We (1920)

Osip Mandelstam.  The Noise of Time (1923)

Trotsky, Leon.  Literature and Revolution (1923) (excerpts)

Various manifestos and documents (course packet)

Poems by Velimir Khlebnikov, Konstantin Balmont, Valery Bryusov, Anna Akhmatova and others (course packet)

REE S325 • Rebels/Revolutnrs Rus Hist/Lit

87780 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am BUR 116
(also listed as C L S323, HIS S362G, RUS S356 )
show description

REE 325 • Lit & Art,Rus Modern & Av-Gard

44605 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm PAR 303
(also listed as RUS 330 )
show description

Course Description

 

Focusing on literary and artistic expressions of Russian modernist and avant-garde aesthetics, this course explores various responses to Russian cultural modernity between 1890s, when Russian Symbolists first published their works, and the Party decree of 1932 that established the Writers’ Union and outlawed all other artistic organizations.  Unfolding against the background of the revolutions and civil war in Russia, diverse manifestations of the spirit of modernity were captured by the aesthetics of Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes, Futurists’ shocking manifestos, socialist realist works, and avant-garde art movements like Constructivism and Malevich’s Suprematism, among others.  While reading critically both textual and non-textual works, we will constantly reference the unique socio-political and cultural context of the period locally and globally in order to create a panoramic vision of possibly the richest period in Russian culture.

  

Texts:

Dmitry Merezhkovsky. On the Causes of the Decline and on the New Trends in Contemporary Russian Literature (1892) (Excerpts)

Alexandr Blok.  The Unknown Lady (1906)

A Slap in the Face of Public Face (1912)

Igor Stravinsky.  The Rite of Spring (1913)

Vladimir Mayakovsky.  A Cloud in Trousers (1915)

---. About That (1923)

Evgeny Zamiatin. We (1920)

Osip Mandelstam.  The Noise of Time (1923)

Trotsky, Leon.  Literature and Revolution (1923) (excerpts)

Various manifestos and documents (course packet)

Poems by Velimir Khlebnikov, Konstantin Balmont, Valery Bryusov, Anna Akhmatova and others (course packet 

 

Requirements and Grading

 

Participation – 10%

Short response paper – 15%

Presentation – 15%

Two exams – 30%

Final paper or multimedia project – 30%

REE 325 • Rebels/Revolutnrs Rus Hist/Lit

44469 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BEN 1.122
(also listed as RUS 356 )
show description

Course Description: Spanning almost a century of Russian literature, this course highlights a gallery of fictional and real rebels and revolutionaries.  What was their cause?  Who supported them?  How were they portrayed in popular novels of the time?  We will supplement textual analysis of prose and poetry with the study of historical documents in order to understand the complex historical, moral, and cultural dimensions of such enduring phenomena as revolution, rebellion, and terrorism.

 Course Materials:

Pushkin, Aleksandr.  The Captain’s Daughter (1836)

Pushkin, Aleksandr.  “In the Depths of Siberian Mines” (1827)*

Turgenev, Ivan.  Fathers and Sons (1862)

Bakunin, Mikhail.  The Revolutionary Catechism (1865) vs. Nechaev's Catechism of the Revolutionary (1869)(excerpts)*

Dostoevsky, Fyodor.  The Demons (1873)

Vera Zasulich's memoirs (excerpts from Five Sisters: Women against the Tsar)*

Andreyev, Leonid.  “The Seven That Were Hanged” (1909)

Bely, Andrei.  Petersburg (1913)

Related documents and articles*

*Included in Course Packet

 

Class Attendance:  Twice-weekly class attendance is required.  You are expected to read all assigned texts before the class and to participate actively in the discussion.    According to the General Information catalog, “[a] student who is absent from a class or examination for the

observance of a religious holy day may complete the work issued within a reasonable time after the

absence, if proper notice has been given” (page 71). The deadline for notification of such an absence

is fourteen days prior to the class absence or the first class day for religious holy days that fall

within the first two weeks of the semester.

 

Deadlines: 

February 15 – First in-class exam

March 1 – Response paper #1 due

March 10 – Revised paper due

March 29 – Second in-class exam

April 7 – Response paper #2 due

April 19 – Revised paper due

May 6 – Third in-class exam

May 15 – Final paper due

*Deadlines are subject to change.  Please consult Blackboard for latest announcements!*

 

Special Accommodations: At the beginning of the semester, students with disabilities who need special accommodations should notify the instructor by presenting a letter prepared by the Services for Students with Disabilities Office. To ensure that the most appropriate accommodations can be provided, students should contact the SSD Office at 471-6259 or 471-4641 TTY.

 

Policy on Scholastic Dishonesty: Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced.  Refer to the Student Judicial Services website for official University policies and procedures on scholastic dishonesty.

 

Grade Evaluations: 

 

a. Two Response Papers (10% each):  Response papers should reflect your thinking on assigned reading.  Format: 3-5 pages (at least 1,000 words), Times New Roman, 12 pt.  You will be evaluated on the depth and quality of your reflections, clarity of style, and cohesive argumentation.  After you receive your paper back, you will have about a week to revise and resubmit it.  Detailed instructions will be provided two weeks before the due date.

 b. Three In-Class Exams (10% each): Each exam will test your knowledge of material discussed in class and read independently at home.

 c.  Presentation (10%): Individually or in pairs, you will prepare a 5-10-minute oral presentation on one of the topics offered in the beginning of the semester.  You will discuss your presentation with your instructor no later than two weeks in advance.

d. Final Paper  (30%):  You final paper may draw on one of your response papers.  It should include  your reflections on the topic supported by textual evidence from assigned works.  Detailed instructions will be available mid-semester.  Format: 8-10 pages (at least 2,500 words), Times New Roman, 12 pt.

 e. Participation (10%):  Your instructor will determine this part of the grade based on your preparedness and participation in class.  There are three components of success: regular attendance, advance reading/preparation of assigned materials, and insightful, well-formulated comments during discussions.

REE 325 • Rebels/Revolutnrs Rus Hist/Lit

45174 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GAR 3.116
(also listed as C L 323, RUS 356 )
show description

Course Description: Spanning almost a century of Russian literature, this course highlights a gallery of fictional and real rebels and revolutionaries.  What was their cause?  Who supported them?  How were they portrayed in popular novels of the time?  We will supplement textual analysis of prose and poetry with the study of historical documents in order to understand the complex historical, moral, and cultural dimensions of such enduring phenomena as revolution, rebellion, and terrorism.

 Course Materials:

Pushkin, Aleksandr.  The Captain’s Daughter (1836)

Pushkin, Aleksandr.  “In the Depths of Siberian Mines” (1827)*

Turgenev, Ivan.  Fathers and Sons (1862)

Bakunin, Mikhail.  The Revolutionary Catechism (1865) vs. Nechaev's Catechism of the Revolutionary (1869) (excerpts)*

Dostoevsky, Fyodor.  The Demons (1873)

Vera Zasulich's memoirs (excerpts from Five Sisters: Women against the Tsar)*

Andreyev, Leonid.  “The Seven That Were Hanged” (1909)

Bely, Andrei.  Petersburg (1913)

Related documents and articles*

*Included in Course Packet

 

Class Attendance:  Twice-weekly class attendance is required.  You are expected to read all assigned texts before the class and to participate actively in the discussion.    According to the General Information catalog, “[a] student who is absent from a class or examination for the

observance of a religious holy day may complete the work issued within a reasonable time after the

absence, if proper notice has been given” (page 71). The deadline for notification of such an absence

is fourteen days prior to the class absence or the first class day for religious holy days that fall

within the first two weeks of the semester.

 

Deadlines: 

February 15 – First in-class exam

March 1 – Response paper #1 due

March 10 – Revised paper due

March 29 – Second in-class exam

April 7 – Response paper #2 due

April 19 – Revised paper due

May 6 – Third in-class exam

May 15 – Final paper due

*Deadlines are subject to change.  Please consult Blackboard for latest announcements!*

 

Special Accommodations: At the beginning of the semester, students with disabilities who need special accommodations should notify the instructor by presenting a letter prepared by the Services for Students with Disabilities Office. To ensure that the most appropriate accommodations can be provided, students should contact the SSD Office at 471-6259 or 471-4641 TTY.

 

Policy on Scholastic Dishonesty: Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced.  Refer to the Student Judicial Services website for official University policies and procedures on scholastic dishonesty.

 

Grade Evaluations: 

 

a. Two Response Papers (10% each):  Response papers should reflect your thinking on assigned reading.  Format: 3-5 pages (at least 1,000 words), Times New Roman, 12 pt.  You will be evaluated on the depth and quality of your reflections, clarity of style, and cohesive argumentation.  After you receive your paper back, you will have about a week to revise and resubmit it.  Detailed instructions will be provided two weeks before the due date.

 b. Three In-Class Exams (10% each): Each exam will test your knowledge of material discussed in class and read independently at home.

 c.  Presentation (10%): Individually or in pairs, you will prepare a 5-10-minute oral presentation on one of the topics offered in the beginning of the semester.  You will discuss your presentation with your instructor no later than two weeks in advance.

d. Final Paper  (30%):  You final paper may draw on one of your response papers.  It should include  your reflections on the topic supported by textual evidence from assigned works.  Detailed instructions will be available mid-semester.  Format: 8-10 pages (at least 2,500 words), Times New Roman, 12 pt.

 e. Participation (10%):  Your instructor will determine this part of the grade based on your preparedness and participation in class.  There are three components of success: regular attendance, advance reading/preparation of assigned materials, and insightful, well-formulated comments during discussions.

Undergraduate Courses

Fall 2010 RUS 412K "Second Year Russian I"

Course Description

This course is the third semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily thorough workbook home assignments. 

Texts:

Russian Stage 2, Welcome Back. Martin-Zaitseiv

Requirements and Grading

In-class tests                        30%

Final Exam                        30%

Homework                        25%

Participation                        15%

 

Prerequisites: RUS 804, 507, 507T, or appropriate score on Russian placement examination.

Fall 2011 RUS 412K "Second-Year Russian I"

Required Textbook: • Irina Dolgova and Cynthia Martin.  Russian: Stage Two: Welcome Back!,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2009).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, two workbooks, two audio CDs, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.

 

Recommended:  All available at the University Co-op:

            • Wade, Terrence. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar (Oxford: Blackwell, 1994).

             • Gerhart, Genevra. The Russian's World.  (Bloomington: Slavica Publishers, 2000).

• Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary, (New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994).

Welcome to the Russian 412! You are entering into the intermediate level of language and culture instruction in one of the world’s most spoken and influential languages. Russian is spoken by 150 million in the former Soviet Union and by another 50 million Russians living all over the world – including New York, Los Angeles, and Houston. This is the year of Russian study that will best prepare you to read the brilliant works of Russian literature, to undertake a longer term of study abroad, to watch Russian films and television in the original, and of course to major in Slavic Studies here at UT! Russian is not only one of the official languages of diplomacy at the U.N., and a member language of the G-8, it is a language for which your prospects in business, engineering, teaching, law, and medicine are greatly enhanced with a reasonable functional proficiency. So whatever your goal, we hope that your second year of study of Russian will bring you many rewards! А сейчас, давайте начнём! 

Fall 2011 RUS 356/REE 325/C L 323 “Rebels and Revolutionaries in Russian History and Literature”

Course Description: Spanning almost a century of Russian literature, this course highlights a gallery of fictional and real rebels and revolutionaries.  Were they heroes and martyrs who sacrificed their lives to improve the lot of others?  Or unscrupulous and manipulative individuals who disguised their thirst for power behind an agenda of societal betterment?  From Pushkin’s portrayal of Emelian Pugachev’s rebellion in the 1770s to Nechaev’s organized revolutionary group, which inspired Dostoevsky’s Demons, to Bakunin’s writings and memoirs of notorious revolutionaries and intelligentsia’s responses to the “revolutionary virus,” the array of representations of rebels and revolutionaries simultaneously served as a reflection of their popular perception and formed the reading public’s opinion on these issues.  We will supplement textual analysis of prose and poetry with the study of historical documents in order to understand the complex historical, moral, and cultural dimensions of such enduring phenomena as revolution, rebellion, and terrorism. 

Course Materials:

Pushkin, Aleksandr.  The Captain’s Daughter (1836)

Pushkin, Aleksandr.  “In the Depths of Siberian Mines” (1827)*

Bakunin, Mikhail.  The Revolutionary Catechism (1865)*

Nechaev's Catechism of the Revolutionary (1869) (excerpts)*

Dostoevsky, Fyodor.  The Demons (1873)

Stepniak-Kravchinsky, Sergei.  Underground Russia: Revolutionary Profiles and Sketches from Life (1883) – Google Books

Vera Zasulich's memoirs (excerpts from Five Sisters: Women against the Tsar)*

Ropshin, V. (Savinkov, Boris) Pale Steed (1909) – Google Books

Andreyev, Leonid. The Seven Who Were Hanged (1909) – Google Books

*Included in course packet available from Jenn’s Copies on Guadalupe St.

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