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Mary Neuburger, Director BUR 452, 2505 University Avenue, Stop F3600, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-3607

Robert Moser

Professor Ph.D., University of Wisconsin

Robert Moser

Contact

Biography

Professor Moser specializes in the study of electoral systems, political parties, ethnicity and elections, women’s and minority representation, and Russian politics. He has written numerous book chapters and articles on democratization, elections, and political parties in the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. His articles have appeared in World Politics, Comparative Political Studies, Comparative Politics, Legislative Studies Quarterly, Electoral Studies, and Post- Soviet Affairs. His research has been funded by SSRC, IREX, and the Ford Foundation.

He was appointed the William D. Blunk Memorial Professor for 2005-06 in recognition of his undergraduate teaching and advising and was awarded the President's Associates Teaching Excellence Award in 2002. More recently, Moser received the 2008 Harry Ransom Award for Excellence in Teaching and the Silver Spurs Endowed Teaching Fellowship in 2010.

He is the author of Unexpected Outcomes: Electoral Systems, Political Parties, and Representation in Russia (2001) and co-editor, with Zoltan Barany, of Russian Politics: Challenges of Democratization (2001), Ethnic Politics after Communism (2005), and Is Democracy Exportable? (2009). His latest book, co-authored with Ethan Scheiner, is Electoral Systems and Political Context(2012).

REE F335 • Politics Of New Democracies

87742 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm MEZ B0.306
(also listed as GOV F365N, LAS F337M )
show description

Prerequisites

6 hours lower-division coursework in GOV

 

Course Description

One of the most important developments in the last quarter century has been the expansion of democracy around the world. The most dramatic events of the late 20th century and the early 21st century — the fall of the Berlin Wall, the end of apartheid, the collapse of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War, and the “Arab Spring” — have all been associated with what scholars have called the “third (and now fourth) wave” of democratization, in which authoritarian regimes around the world collapsed in favor of varying degrees of democratic governance. With the end of the Cold War and the emergence of the threat of international terrorism, the spread of democracy, particularly in the Middle East, has become a central tenet of U.S. foreign policy and the “war on terror.” International terrorism has presented consolidated and emergent democracies with their greatest challenge to date. Democracy is seen as a primary antidote to this threat but also its chief target.

This course will examine the process of democratization in an attempt to determine which factors make the consolidation of democracy in a formerly authoritarian system more likely. The course will be organized thematically rather than regionally, meaning that we will deal primarily with broad issues that (conceivably) can be generalized to all cases. The examples of democratization used in the course will be drawn from many geopolitical regions including Latin America, post-communist states (Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union), the Middle East, Asia and Africa. After a survey of the central concepts surrounding democratization, the class will focus on specific factors related to successful democratization including: modernization, political culture, institutional design, civil society, and globalization.   

 

Grading Policy

First Take-Home Essay                                            25%

Second Take-Home Essay                                        25%

First Multiple Choice Exam                                        20%

Second Multiple Choice Exam                                    20%

Participation (based on in-class quizzes)                    10%

 

Texts 

Fareed Zakaria, The Future of Freedom (New York:  W.W. Norton, 2007).

Zoltan Barany and Robert G. Moser (eds.), Is Democracy Exportable? (New York: Cambridge UP, 2009).

 

 

REE 335 • Govs And Politics Of Russia

44685 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm MEZ B0.306
(also listed as GOV 336M )
show description

Course Description

Twice in the 20th century Russia experienced revolutionary political, economic, and social change. Since the communist regime collapse in 1991, Russia has attempted to simultaneously transform its political system from a communist regime to a democratic one and its state-controlled economy to one based on a free market. While engaged in this daunting task, the country has also had to deal with the precipitous decline in international power and influence that accompanied the dismemberment of the Soviet Union, loss of empire in Eastern Europe, and defeat in its superpower struggle with the United States. Begun with high hopes of a smooth transition to free market democracy, this transformation instead produced a decade-long economic collapse and very fragile democratic and capitalist institutions.  In the 2000s, President Vladimir Putin ushered in a highly centralized political system that was marked by excessive executive power, severe restrictions on civil liberties, human rights, and media freedoms, and manipulated and fraudulent elections.  Essentially, Russia has returned to authoritarian rule despite retaining some of the trappings of democratic politics.

This course will introduce students to the political development in Russia from 1917 to the present. It is vitally necessary to have some background on the Soviet system if one is to understand the contemporary situation. Thus, we will spend the first one-third of the course examining the birth, life, and death of the Soviet Union. After this, we will discuss the twin challenges of democratization and radical market reform facing the new post-Soviet Russian state. We will examine competing explanations including culture, institutions, and leadership decisions that can account for the difficulties Russia has had establishing a functional democracy and market economy.

 

Grading Policy

First Take-Home Essay                                              25%

First Midterm Exam                                                   20%

Second Take-Home Essay                                          25%

Second Midterm Exam                                               20%

Participation (based on in-class quizzes)                      10%

 

Texts

M. Steven Fish, Democracy Derailed in Russia.

Z. Barany and R. Moser (eds.), Russian Politics: Challenges of Democratization.

REE 335 • Politics Of New Democracies

44477 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm MEZ B0.306
(also listed as GOV 365N, LAS 337M )
show description

see syllabus

REE 335 • Govs And Politics Of Russia

44485 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am MEZ B0.306
(also listed as GOV 336M )
show description

Course Description

Twice in the 20th century Russia experienced revolutionary political, economic, and social change. Since the communist regime collapse in 1991, Russia has attempted to simultaneously transform its political system from a communist regime to a democratic one and its state-controlled economy to one based on a free market. While engaged in this daunting task, the country has also had to deal with the precipitous decline in international power and influence that accompanied the dismemberment of the Soviet Union, loss of empire in Eastern Europe, and defeat in its superpower struggle with the United States. Begun with high hopes of a smooth transition to free market democracy, this transformation instead produced a decade-long economic collapse and very fragile democratic and capitalist institutions.  In the 2000s, President Vladimir Putin ushered in a highly centralized political system that was marked by excessive executive power, severe restrictions on civil liberties, human rights, and media freedoms, and manipulated and fraudulent elections.  Essentially, Russia has returned to authoritarian rule despite retaining some of the trappings of democratic politics.

This course will introduce students to the political development in Russia from 1917 to the present. It is vitally necessary to have some background on the Soviet system if one is to understand the contemporary situation. Thus, we will spend the first one-third of the course examining the birth, life, and death of the Soviet Union. After this, we will discuss the twin challenges of democratization and radical market reform facing the new post-Soviet Russian state. We will examine competing explanations including culture, institutions, and leadership decisions that can account for the difficulties Russia has had establishing a functional democracy and market economy.

Texts:

M. Steven Fish, Democracy Derailed in Russia.

Z. Barany and R. Moser (eds.), Russian Politics: Challenges of Democratization.

Grading:

Test I                           30%

Test II                          30%

Take-home Essay            30%

Participation                   10%

REE S335 • Politics Of New Democracies

88163 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm PAR 301
(also listed as GOV S365N )
show description

One of the most important developments in the last quarter century has been the expansion of democracy around the world.  The most dramatic events of the late 20th century — the fall of the Berlin Wall, the end of apartheid, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and the end of the Cold War — have all been associated with what scholars have called the “third wave” of democratization, in which authoritarian regimes around the world collapsed in favor of varying degrees of democratic governance. With the end of the Cold War and the emergence of the threat of international terrorism, the spread of democracy, particularly in the Middle East, has become a central tenet of U.S. foreign policy and the “war on terror.”  International terrorism has presented consolidated and emergent democracies with their greatest challenge to date.  Democracy is seen as a primary antidote to this threat as well as its chief target.

 

This course will examine the process of democratization in an attempt to determine which factors make the consolidation of democracy in a formerly authoritarian system more likely.  The course will be organized thematically rather than regionally, meaning that we will deal primarily with broad issues that (conceivably) can be generalized to all cases.  The examples of democratization used in the course will be drawn from many geopolitical regions including Latin America, post-communist states (Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union), the Middle East, Asia and Africa.  After a survey of the central concepts surrounding democratization, the class will focus on specific factors related to successful democratization including: modernization, political culture, institutional design, civil society, and globalization.    

REE 335 • Govs And Politics Of Russia

44570 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am MEZ 1.306
(also listed as GOV 336M )
show description

Course Description

Twice in the 20th century Russia experienced revolutionary political, economic, and social change. Since the communist regime collapse in 1991, Russia has attempted to simultaneously transform its political system from a communist regime to a democratic one and its state-controlled economy to one based on a free market. While engaged in this daunting task, the country has also had to deal with the precipitous decline in international power and influence that accompanied the dismemberment of the Soviet Union, loss of empire in Eastern Europe, and defeat in its superpower struggle with the United States. Begun with high hopes of a smooth transition to free market democracy, this transformation instead produced a decade-long economic collapse and very fragile democratic and capitalist institutions.  In the 2000s, President Vladimir Putin ushered in a highly centralized political system that was marked by excessive executive power, severe restrictions on civil liberties, human rights, and media freedoms, and manipulated and fraudulent elections.  Essentially, Russia has returned to authoritarian rule despite retaining some of the trappings of democratic politics.

 

This course will introduce students to the political development in Russia from 1917 to the present. It is vitally necessary to have some background on the Soviet system if one is to understand the contemporary situation. Thus, we will spend the first one-third of the course examining the birth, life, and death of the Soviet Union. After this, we will discuss the twin challenges of democratization and radical market reform facing the new post-Soviet Russian state. We will examine competing explanations including culture, institutions, and leadership decisions that can account for the difficulties Russia has had establishing a functional democracy and market economy.

 

Texts:

 

M. Steven Fish, Democracy Derailed in Russia.

Z. Barany and R. Moser (eds.), Russian Politics: Challenges of Democratization.

 

Grading:

 

Test I                                    30%

Test II                                    30%

Take-home Essay            30%

Participation                        10%

 

 

Books Published

Electoral Systems and Political Context: How the Effects of Rules Vary Across New and Established Democracies (with E. Scheiner) (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012)

Moser and Scheiner Book Cover

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Is Democracy Exportable? (coedited with Z. Barany) (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009)

Is Democracy Exportable Cover

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ethnic Politics After Communism (coedited with Z. Barany) (Ithica, NY: Cornell University Press, 2005) 

Ethnic Politics After Communism Cover

 

 

 

 

 


Unexpected Outcomes: Electoral Systems, Political Parties, and Representation in Russia (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2001)

unexpected outcomes cover

 

 

 

 

 

 


Russian Politics: Challenges of Democratization (coedited with Z. Barany) (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001)

Challenges of Democratization Cover

Journal Articles

“Ethnicity and Electoral Manipulation in Russia,” (with Regina Goodnow and Tony Smith), Electoral Studies, forthcoming.

"Between Science and Engineering: Reflections on the APSA Presidential Task Force on Political Science, Electoral Rules, and Democratic Governance," (Htun et al) Perspectives on Politics, Sept. 2013

“Electoral Rules and Political Inclusion,” (with Mona Lena Krook) in Political Science, Electoral Rules, and Democratic Governance. Report of the Task Force on Electoral Rules and Democratic Governance, Edited by Mala Htun and G. Bingham Powell, Jr. (2013)

“Layers of Ethnicity: The Effects of Ethnic Federalism, Majority-Minority Districts, and Minority Concentration on the Electoral Success of Ethnic Minorities in Russia,” (with Regina Goodnow) Comparative Political Studies Vol. 45, No. 2 (2012), pp. 238-264.

“Do Ethnic Parties Exclude Women?” (with Stephanie Holmsten and Mary Slosar) Comparative Political Studies Vol. 43, No. 10 (2010), pp. 1179–1201.

“The Impact of Minority-Majority Districts: Evidence from Ukraine,” (with Julie George and Marko Papic) Post-Soviet Affairs Vol. 26, No. 1 (2010), pp. 58-76.

“Strategic Voting in Mixed-Member Systems: An Analysis of Split-Ticket Voting,” (with Ethan Scheiner) Electoral Studies, Vol. 28, No. 1 (2009), pp. 51-61.

“Electoral Systems and the Representation of Ethnic Minorities: Evidence from Russia,”
Comparative Politics, Vol. 40, No. 3 (2008), pp. 273-292.

“Strategic Ticket Splitting and the Personal Vote in Mixed Systems: A Reconceptualization with Data from Five Countries,” (with Ethan Scheiner) Legislative Studies Quarterly, Vol. XXX (2005), pp. 259-276.

“Mixed Electoral Systems and Electoral System Effects: Controlled Comparison and Cross- National Analysis,” (with Ethan Scheiner) Electoral Studies, Vol. 23, No. 4 (2004), pp. 575-599.

"The Effects of Electoral Systems on Women's Representation in Post-Communist States," Electoral Studies, Vol. 20, No. 3 (2001), pp. 353-369.

"Electoral Systems and the Number of Parties in Post-Communist States," World Politics, Vol. 51, No. 3 (1999), pp. 359-384.

"Independents and Party Formation: Elite Partisanship as an Intervening Variable in Russian Politics," Comparative Politics, Vol. 31, No. 2 (1999), pp. 147-165.

"The Impact of Parliamentary Electoral Systems in Russia," Post-Soviet Affairs, Vol. 13, No. 3 (1997), pp. 284-302.

"The Impact of the Electoral System on Post-Communist Party Development: The Case of the 1993 Russian Parliamentary Elections," Electoral Studies, Vol. 14, No. 4 (1995), pp. 377-398.

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