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Lisa Moore Interim, Director 2505 University Avenue, A4900, Burdine Hall 536, Austin Texas 78712 • 512-471-5765

Latin American Feminisms and the Challenges of Decoloniality, a talk by Claudia de Lima Costa

Mon, November 19, 2012 • 3:00 PM • GEB 4th Floor Conference Room

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Intersecciones/Interseções/Intersections: Feminisms in Latin America Today (Speaker Series)

One of the most powerful interventions in feminist theory at the end of the 20th century was the direct articulation of the notion of intersectionality by women of color in the US who argued that rather than being seen as separate, discrete or additive concepts race, gender, ethnicity and social class needed to be viewed as elements that simultaneously shaped and transformed the lived experience of women (and men). This speaker series, jointly organized by the Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies and the Center for Women's and Gender Studies, explores the way the concept of intersectionality has "traveled" to Latin America by bringing together state of the art feminist research by Latin American feminists or US scholars of Latin America that engages with race/gender/ethnicity from different perspectives.

Brown Bag Discussion - 11:30am - 1:30pm (GEB 4th floor conference room)

Talk is from 3:00 - 4:30pm (GEB 4th floor conference room)

A Reception Follows from 5:00 -7:00pm (GEB 3rd floor conference room)

 

Latin American Feminisms and the Challenges of Decoloniality

By Claudia de Lima Costa (Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Brazil)
In this presentation, Claudia will place Latin American postcolonial feminisms in conversation with those academic/activists who claim the need to decolonize feminist knowledges. By emphasizing an intersectional approach to understand the gendered character of coloniality, decolonial feminists are seeking innovative ways of articulating new epistemologies or “saberes propios.” However, in these debates little attention has been given to the issue of the travels and translations of decolonial feminisms in Latin America.  In focusing on the vexed issue of translation, she will explore how the post- and the decolonial turn in Latin American feminisms may avoid being entrapped in a coloniality of decoloniality.

Sponsored by: Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies, the Center for Women's and Gender Studies, and the Department of Spanish and Portuguese


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