Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
cwgs masthead
Lisa Moore Interim, Director 2505 University Avenue, A4900, Burdine Hall 536, Austin Texas 78712 • 512-471-5765

Learning from José Muñoz: A teach-in symposium

Wed, April 16, 2014 • 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM • CLA 1.302E (Glickman Conference Center)

db-image

Learning from José Muñoz:  A teach-in symposium

Wednesday April 16  5-8 pm
CLA 1.302E  (Glickman Conference Center)

The symposium will include presentations by Muñoz's students, Ricardo Montez (assistant professor, New School) and Joshua Guzmán (PhD candidate in Performance Studies at NYU) and brief comments by UT faculty and graduate students about how they use Muñoz's work in their teaching and research.  See further details on the talks below.

 Learning from José Muñoz:  A teach-in symposium

Wednesday April 16  5-8 pm
CLA 1.302E  (Glickman Conference Center)

The symposium will include presentations by Muñoz's students, Ricardo Montez (assistant professor, New School) and Joshua Guzmán (PhD candidate in Performance Studies at NYU) and brief comments by UT faculty and graduate students about how they use Muñoz's work in their teaching and research.  For details on the lectures see below.  

Schedule:
5:00-5:15   Welcome
5:15-5:45   Lessons
5:45-6:45   Lectures by Josh Guzmán and Ricardo Montez
6:45-7:00   break
7:00-8:00   Lessons

Participants will include:
Julie Minich (English/CMAS)
Sarah Orem (English)
Laura Gutierrez (Theatre and Dance)
Pilou Miller (MA, Performance Studies, NYU)
James McMaster (Theatre and Dance)
Lisa Moore (English)
Peter Rehberg (Germanic Studies)
Nicole Guidotti-Hernandez (American Studies/CMAS)
Tarek El-Ariss (Middle Eastern Studies)
Cynthia Francica (Comp Lit)
Sharmila Rudrappa (Sociology/ Asian American Studies)
Chad Bennett (English)
Jossianna Arroyo Martinez (Spanish and Portuguese)

Sponsored by the LGBTQ/Sexualities Research Cluster, Center for Mexican American Studies, Department of English, and Department of Theatre and Dance.

Ricardo Montez, "Unresolved: Affects and Potentials in the Aftermath of Loss"

What does it mean to pursue utopic possibility in the legacy of José Muñoz? Longing for the intimacies of the past while striving for something like a better future feels an apt way to describe a present condition of desire for Muñoz’s many mentees. It is as if the language of queer futurity teased out so expertly by Muñoz in relation to art and performance offers a necessary script or mode of survival in the face of his particular passing. Yet, what becomes all too clear in our communal  and divergent responses to loss, are the ways in which Muñoz was not scripting the terms of his singular legacy so much as he was situating his subjecthood within the larger social and historical realities of life in queerness. Through an examination of projects in process, this presentation considers the simultaneous pleasures and pains of working with Muñoz.  In particular, Montez considers the after life of Muñoz’s intimacy-as-pedagogy project where one might be left to confront the nature of attachment and to manage a host of conflicted feelings concerning appropriate ways to move forward.  Attentive to the productive nature of feelings in conflict, Montez looks to the space of the unresolved as evidencing something like methodological strategies for continuing Muñoz’s work in queerness.

Ricardo Montez is Assistant Professor of Performance Studies and Co-Chair of Liberal Arts at the New School for Public Engagement. He is currently curating an art exhibit for Visual AIDS that takes its title from José Muñoz’s 1996 essay, “Ephemera As Evidence,” and explores the ephemeral in relation to artists affected by HIV/AIDS.   His first book, Keith Haring’s Line: Race, Collaboration and Desire, is forthcoming from Duke University Press.


Joshua Guzmán, "Comedown, Be Brown"

Towards the end of his short career, José Muñoz turned to the philosophy of Jean Luc-Nancy to articulate what Muñoz termed as the sense of brown. This was a critical shift away from the intersection of ethnic and affect studies. Muñoz’s move from feeling to sense accounts for the onto-poetics of Latinidad, which he understood as brownness. Guzmán’s paper begins with the ends and fringes of Muñoz’s unfinished project. For Muñoz, if queerness is always on the horizon and not-yet-here, brownness is then situated as the here-and-now and the materiality making up everyday life.
Meanwhile, many people in the wake of Muñoz’s passing have taking up the coda of his Cruising Utopia as a call to take ecstasy with the utopian thinker, to engage in a collective imagining of better futures and different pleasures. Shifting registers, Guzmán foregrounds the brownness structuring the queer in order to take seriously the political potential of something like the comedown from the ecstatic. Guzmán accounts for the mundane and quotidian life-moments of living in and through the loss of José. Guzmán ends by arguing that brownness is about living-in and being-with the thick haze of everyday life, where the comedown structures the dissolving materiality leftover from the failed promise of the “high.”  

Joshua Javier Guzmán is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Performance Studies at New York University who specializes in Chicano avant-garde film, video, and performance. His dissertation examines the queer punk and Chicano/a avant-garde art scenes in post-’68 Los Angeles from the rise of Reagan up to the AIDS epidemic, tentatively titled “Dark Mediations: Queer Chicano Performance and the Politics of Style.” In addition, he shares a deep interest in and writes about the performance of photography and imaging. Joshua currently works for the journal, Social Text.


For further info, contact Ann Cvetkovich, cvet@austin.utexas.edu

Sponsored by: LGBTQ/Sexualities Research Cluster, Center for Mexican American Studies, and Department of Theatre and Dance (Performance as Public Practice


Bookmark and Share
bottom border