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Lisa Moore Interim, Director 2505 University Avenue, A4900, Burdine Hall 536, Austin Texas 78712 • 512-471-5765

Ann Cvetkovich

Core Faculty Ph.D., 1988, Cornell University

Professor
Ann Cvetkovich

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Biography

College: Liberal Arts

Home Department: English

Additional department affiliations: Asian-American Studies

Education: Ph.D., Cornell

Research interests:19th/20th century popular and mass culture, feminist theory; lesbian and gay
studies, the formation of subcultures, local counterpublics, and lesbian communities;
public feelings; trauma studies; women, gender and literature; American Literature;
19th Century British Literature; popular culture; literary theory.

Courses taught:
WGS 301 Difficult Dialogue-Religion/Sexuality

WGS 345 30-Gay and
Lesbian Literature and Culture-W

WGS 301 • Introduction To Lgbtq Studies

47895 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 500pm-630pm CAL 419
show description

This introductory course will provide basic skills in theory, history, and research methods relevant to LGBTQ studies.  Beginning from the premise that sexual identity has a history rather than being a universal category, we will explore concepts of gender and sexuality, as well as related categories of race, class, religion, nation.  We will also briefly survey the making of modern understandings of sexual and LGBTQ identities in the last one hundred years and the implications of this history for broader understandings of gender and sexuality. 

 

The course will be oriented around key questions and debates, including as many of the following as possible: being “born that way” vs. social construction of identity; recent public debates about gay marriage and civil rights; new constructions of family, intimacy, and sociality; critiques of “normativity” and the meaning and uses of the term “queer”; LGBTQ identities and same-sex sexualities in a transnational and global context;  controversies around religion and LGBTQ identities;  transgender activism and new constructions of gender and gender politics; sex, including feminist sex-positivity, cruising cultures, and new social media; the impact of HIV/AIDS and AIDS activism;  the role of art, culture, and representation in LGBTQ culture.

 

The course is open to all and aims to encourage self-reflection and dialogue around gender and sexual differences and to promote the work of being an ally to LGBTQ-identified people.

Consent of Instructor required.

WGS 345 • Feminism And Creative Non-Fict

47835 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 204
(also listed as E 370W )
show description

Instructor:  Cvetkovich, A Areas:  V / G

Unique #:  35940 Flags:  Global Cultures; Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013 Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  WGS 345 Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course will explore the increasing visibility of creative non-fiction in fostering public debate and making social and political interventions.  We will consider whether the genre of “creative non-fiction” differs from non-fiction prose or the essay, as well as how it overlaps with memoir, fiction, and experimental writing.

As a “Gender, Literature, Culture” offering, the course will focus on women writers in order to consider how creative non-fiction has been shaped by feminist work and how it promotes feminist concerns.  We will explore the feminist history of creative non-fiction in Virginia Woolf’s essays; the innovative prose formats used by women of color feminists such as Gloria Anzaldua, Cherrie Moraga, and Audre Lorde; and the new journalism of Joan Didion. Building on that background, we will explore the many ways that women writers are documenting global histories and cultures through creative non-fiction, including subjects such as following:  histories of slavery (Hartman), lesbian modernisms (Cohen), South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (Krog), a husband’s death (Didion), postcolonial tourism (Kincaid), Hurricane Katrina (Trethewey), democracy (Roy), environmentalism (Solnit), multiculturalism (Smith), the Haitian earthquake (Danticat).  Although not all of this work is explicitly concerned with women and gender, we will consider how feminist sensibilities inform its concern with the relation between local experience and global cultures and economies (reflecting the Global Cultures flag). 

In keeping with the course’s Writing flag designation, students will be encouraged to write in a range of forms, including discussion questions, personal narrative, an ethnographic report, and a critical review, some of which will enable them to practice writing their own forms of creative non-fiction.  The final project will include opportunities for revision and peer review.

Texts will be selected from among the following:

Virginia Woolf, Three Guineas

Audre Lorde, “Poetry is not a Luxury” and “The Uses of the Erotic”

Cherrie Moraga, from Loving in the War Years and/or A Xicana Codex

Gloria Anzaldua, from Borderlands/La Frontera

Joan Didion, from Slouching Toward Bethlehem

     *******

Saidiya Hartman, Lose Your Mother

Jamaica Kincaid, A Small Island

Joan Didion, The Year of Magical Thinking

Antje Krog, Country of my Skull

Lisa Cohen, All We Know

Natasha Trethewey, Beyond Katrina

Essays by Rebecca Solnit, from Storming the Gates of Paradise; Arundhati Roy, from Field Notes on Democracy; Zadie Smith, from Changing My Mind; Edwidge Danticat, from Create Dangerously

Requirements & Grading: Discusssion questions posted to Blackboard every other week, 10%; 4 short writing assignments: personal narrative, ethnographic report, review of additional author; critical reading, 10 each%; final essay (7-8-page paper, including proposal, rough draft, peer review, group presentation), 30%; class attendance and participation, 20%.

WGS 345 • Gay And Lesbian Lit And Cul

47420 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 304
(also listed as E 370W )
show description

Instructor:  Cvetkovich, A            Areas:  II / G

Unique #:  35655            Flags:  Cultural diversity; Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  WGS 345            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course will explore how literature and culture have played a role in creating LGBT identities, public cultures, and social movements. We will do some background reading in histories and theories of sexuality and modern notions of sexual identity. We will explore key moments in the history of “homosexuality,” including modernist cosmopolitanisms, the radical literatures of the gay liberation movements of the 1950s-70s, the culture of AIDS and AIDS activism, the explosion of queer visibility in the 1990s and beyond, transnational gay and queer cultures. Our aim will be to provide a “history of the present,” that is, to consider how knowledge of previous generations of culture and activism can inform the present. Another of the primary goals of the course will be to consider the ongoing role of alternative culture in an era of marriage equality and neoliberal sexual politics.

It will be useful for students to have taken at least one course in women's studies or have equivalent background in women's studies or gay and lesbian studies. If you're not sure about your preparation, please consult with me.

Texts [tentative]: Henry Abelove, Michele Barale, David Halperin, The Lesbian and Gay Studies Reader (essays by Gayle Rubin, Adrienne Rich, Judith Butler, David Halperin, John D'Emilio, and others); Oscar Wilde, “Portrait of Mr. W.H.”; Radclyffe Hall, “Miss Ogilvy Finds Herself”; Lisa Cohen, All We Know; Audre Lorde, Zami:  A New Spelling of My Name; Shyam Selvadurai, Funny Boy; Dorothy Allison Two or Three Things I Know for Sure; Tony Kushner, Angels in America; Alison Bechdel, Fun Home.

Requirements & Grading: Writing Portfolio (includes Discussion questions every other week; and 4 short writing assignments: personal narrative, queer ethnography, review of a cultural event; critical reading), 50%; Final Project (7-8-page paper, including proposal, rough draft, peer review, group presentation), 30%; Class attendance and participation, 20%.

WGS 393 • Queer Affect, Queer Archives

47530 • Spring 2013
Meets T 500pm-800pm CLA 0.108
(also listed as E 389P )
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Queer Affect, Queer Archives

This course will explore the combined impact of the affective turn and the archival turn in literary and cultural studies with particular emphasis on queer studies.  We will read theoretical texts in these areas alongside selected primary texts that will serve as case studies.  The course will also involve some work in the HRC with the aim of exploring the queer dimensions of its collections and the study of them. The course will also concern itself with questions of documentary form and the role of fiction, literature, and experimental genres in representing archival and affective histories.  We will also focus on creative interventions with existing archives to create counterarchives.

We will focus on writing affect and archive through a series of texts (both fiction and creative non-fiction) to be read as case histories alongside of relevant theory.  These texts will represent areas such as the histories of slavery and colonialism, the Holocaust, histories of 9/11, histories of sexuality and AIDS activism, everyday life.   Topics to be explored will include archive theory; queer temporalities; oral history, testimony, and memoir as documentary genres; ephemera and theories of the ordinary and everyday; photography and visual archives; the current state of LGBT archives; indigenous approaches to the archive; artists working with archives.

Tentative Texts

Saidiya Hartman, Lose Your Mother

Cheryl Dunye, The Watermelon Woman (film)

W.G. Sebald, Austerlitz

Orhan Pamuk, Istanbul and/or Museum of Innocence

Lisa Cohen, All We Know

Alison Bechdel, Are You My Mother?

Art projects by Zoe Leonard, Tammy Rae Carland, Allyson Mitchell, fierce pussy, Ulrike Mueller, Catherine Lord, Onya Hogan-Finlay

Essays by Jacques Derrida, Walter Benjamin, Roland Barthes, Gayatri Spivak, Ann Stoler, Antoinette Burton, Anjali Arondekar, Marianne Hirsch, Diana Taylor, Beth Freeman, Carolyn Dinshaw, Jose Munoz, Heather Love

Archives

ACT UP Oral History Archive

September 11, 2001 Oral History Narrative and Memory Project Archive

Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center and other UT archival resources

Assignments

40% Writing exercises, including a report from the archives, a review of a related novel or non-fiction, a close reading, a piece of documentary writing.

40% An 8-10 page conference paper to serve as the basis for presentation at a symposium to be organized by the class for the end of the semester.

20%  Attendance and participation, including discussion questions posted to Blackboard

WGS 345 • Gender, Sexuality, Migratn

47210 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 300pm-430pm PAR 204
(also listed as E 370W )
show description

Instructor:  Cvetkovich, A            Areas:  V / G

Unique #:  35620            Flags:  Cultural diversity, Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  WGS 345            Computer Instruction:  No

Only one of the following may be counted: Asian American Studies 320 (Topic: Gender, Sexuality, and Migration), E 370W (Topic 9), 370W (Topic: Cultures of Immigration and Dislocation).

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Contemporary literature in the U.S. has been transformed by a new generation of writers who address the diverse cultures produced by histories of migration. We will consider how literature, with its attention to the relation between personal and historical experience, provides an especially valuable document of migration and intervenes in public discourse about it. We will read contemporary fiction, mostly by women of color, with particular attention to how migration is shaped by gender and sexuality. Regions and cultures to be explored include the Mexican borderlands; African diaspora in the Caribbean; indigenous cultures in Canada; Vietnamese and South Asian diaspora and exile in the context of war; and gay migration from the rural to the urban. Issues to explored include how personal narrative articulates the intersections of gender, race, sexuality, and nation; how diaspora transforms notions of home and ancestry; and how history and memory shape the present. We will also consider the role of the contemporary writer as public intellectual in contributing to cultural and historical understanding.

The course will also provide students with an opportunity to reflect critically on their own national identities as residents and/or citizens of the United States – what does it mean, and what can it mean, to be “American”? Through critical readings and written assignments that construct a range of archival sources (the personal, the historical, the ethnographic), students will be encouraged to situate their own experience within a broader historical and transnational context.

Texts: Sandra Cisneros, Caramelo; Junot Diaz, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao ; Monique Truong, The Book of Salt ; Marjane Satrapi, Persepolis I; Eden Robinson, Monkey Beach ; Carolyn Steedman, Landscape for a Good Woman.

Requirements & Grading: (Note: +/- grading will be used for portfolio assessment and for the longer paper and group presentation and the final grade will be averaged based on those grades.)

Writing Portfolio:            40%

1) Statement of Goals; Mid-term Self Assessment; Final Self-Assessment

2) Discussion Questions posted to BB every other week

3) 3 short writing assignments: Personal Narrative; History; Ethnography

Final Project: Personal/ Critical Essay            40%

            (includes rough draft, peer editing, group presentation)

Attendance and class participation            20%

WGS 345 • Gender, Sexuality, Migratn

47080 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 330pm-500pm PAR 103
(also listed as E 370W )
show description

Only one of the following may be counted: Asian American Studies 320 (Topic: Gender, Sexuality, and Migration), E 370W (Topic 9), 370W (Topic: Cultures of Immigration and Dislocation).

 Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The history and culture of the United States and the larger Americas have been profoundly shaped by migrations: colonization by European peoples and the resulting displacements of indigenous peoples; the African diaspora forced by slavery and the Great Migration from South to North; the shifting and unstable border between the U.S. and Mexico; the arrival through Ellis Island and other ports of Eastern and Southern Europeans; the long and multiple histories of immigrants from East and South Asia; the movement of gays and lesbians to urban centers; the arrival of refugees from war and genocide; and contemporary transnational and diasporic connections with nations and regions around the world. Although migration is sometimes represented as a threat to the integrity of the nation, it is, in fact, at the center of it.

We will explore the impact of this history by reading contemporary literature mostly by women, with particular attention to how migration is shaped by gender and sexuality. We will consider how literature, with its attention to the relation between personal and historical experience, provides an especially valuable document of migration and intervenes in public discourse about it. The course will also provide students with an opportunity to reflect critically on their own national identities as residents, and in some cases, citizens of the U.S. – what does it mean, and what can it mean, to be “American”? 

Texts: Sandra Cisneros, Caramelo; Junot Diaz, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao ; Monique Truong, The Book of Salt ; Marjane Satrapi, Persepolis I; Eden Robinson, Monkey Beach ; Carolyn Steedman, Landscape for a Good Woman.

Requirements & Grading: (Note: +/- grading will be used for portfolio assessment and for the longer paper and group presentation and the final grade will be averaged based on those grades.)

Writing Portfolio:            40%

1) Statement of Goals; Mid-term Self Assessment; Final Self-Assessment

2) Discussion Questions posted to BB every other week

3) 4 short writing assignments: Personal Narrative; History; Ethnography; Report on Outside Reading

Paper: Personal Narrative as Critical Essay            20%

Group Presentation and Critical Reflection            20%

Attendance and class participation            20%

Publications

Cvetkovich, A. (2008, March) Drawing the Archive in Alison Bechdel's Fun Home. Women's Studies Quarterly, 36(1), 111-128.

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Cvetkovich, A. (2007, June) Public Feelings. SAQ: South Atlantic Quarterly, 106(3), 459-468.

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