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Lisa Moore Interim, Director 2505 University Avenue, A4900, Burdine Hall 536, Austin Texas 78712 • 512-471-5765

Mia Carter

Associate Faculty Ph.D., English and Modern Studies, 1992, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Associate Professor

Contact

Biography

College: Liberal Arts

Home Department: English

Additional department affiliations: Asian-American Studies

Education: PhD, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Research interests:Ethnic and Third World Literature; Popular Culture; Modern British Literature; Women, Gender and Literature; post-colonial and ethnic studies, modernism, 19th and 20th Century British Literature, Imperial studies, film, women's studies.

Courses taught:
WGS 345 MAJOR AUTHORS: VIRGINIA WOOLF

WGS 345 • Virginia Woolf

47910 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 105
(also listed as E 349S )
show description

Instructor:  Carter, M

Unique #:  35820

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  WGS 345

Flags:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: This course will examine the critical and fictional works of Virginia Woolf. We will also be examining Woolf’s continuing legacy and influence. Some of the areas of inquiry the class will be exploring are the value and limitations of high modernism, English literary heritage and tradition, feminism, creative and critical definitions of gender and sexuality, intellectual activism (Woolf’s critiques of patriarchy, war, fascism), Woolf and imperialism-colonialism.

Required Readings (all editions Harcourt Brace Jovanovich; please buy the required HBJ editions)

Selected essays, including “Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown” and “Modern Fiction.”

The Complete Shorter Fiction of Virginia Woolf; The Voyage Out; Jacob’s Room; Mrs. Dalloway; To the Lighthouse; Orlando; The Waves; Three Guineas (long essay)

Requirements & Grading: No late papers will be accepted.

* Three 2-3-page critical analysis essays: 30% of final grade

* One ungraded, but critically assessed seminar paper prospectus.

* One 10-12-page: 40% of final grade

Consistently active, substantial, and significant participation: 30%, a portion of which will be determined by reading quizzes. There will be 4-5 unannounced reading quizzes during the course of the semester.

Class policies: This is a technology-free class; all notes must be taken in notebooks. The use of computers, Blackberries, cell phones is strictly prohibited; exception for full compliance to this rule will be granted only for students with a documented medical need.

Come to class thoroughly prepared, which means keep up with the reading assignments; demonstrate that you have completed the required reading and have thought about it--have analyzed the literature rigorously, critically, and creatively. Consistently active and intellectually substantial and significant participation comprises a large portion of your final grade (30%); therefore silence will not serve you well in this class.  Since I cannot tell you what these texts mean, your success depends--to a great extent--on your willingness to engage with the texts and with your fellow classmates. No one has the final, correct, absolute interpretation of these books. I invite you to take risks, to challenge yourself, and to share your understanding of each novel or film. I also reserve the right to give spontaneous, in-class quizzes if silence appears to be a lack of preparedness.

Attendance Policy: Three absences will drop you a full letter grade (an A will become a B, etc.); four or more absences will guarantee your failure of this class.

WGS 345 • Virginia Woolf

47430 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 105
(also listed as E 349S )
show description

Instructor:  Carter, M            Areas:  I / H

Unique #:  35515            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  WGS 345            Computer Instruction:  No

E 370W (Topic 10: Major Authors: Virginia Woolf) may not also be counted.

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: This course will examine the critical and fictional works of Virginia Woolf. We will also be examining Woolf’s continuing legacy and influence. Some of the areas of inquiry the class will be exploring are the value and limitations of high modernism, English literary heritage and tradition, feminism, creative and critical definitions of gender and sexuality, intellectual activism (Woolf’s critiques of patriarchy, war, fascism), Woolf and imperialism-colonialism.

Required Readings (all editions Harcourt Brace Jovanovich; please buy the required HBJ editions)

Selected essays, including “Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown” and “Modern Fiction.”

The Complete Shorter Fiction of Virginia Woolf; The Voyage Out; Jacob’s Room; Mrs. Dalloway; To the Lighthouse; Orlando; The Waves; Three Guineas (long essay)

Requirements & Grading: No late papers will be accepted.

* Three 2-3-page critical analysis essays: 30% of final grade

* One ungraded, but critically assessed seminar paper prospectus.

* One 10-12-page: 40% of final grade

Consistently active, substantial, and significant participation: 30%, a portion of which will be determined by reading quizzes. There will be 4-5 unannounced reading quizzes during the course of the semester.

Class policies: This is a technology-free class; all notes must be taken in notebooks. The use of computers, Blackberries, cell phones is strictly prohibited; exception for full compliance to this rule will be granted only for students with a documented medical need.

Come to class thoroughly prepared, which means keep up with the reading assignments; demonstrate that you have completed the required reading and have thought about it--have analyzed the literature rigorously, critically, and creatively. Consistently active and intellectually substantial and significant participation comprises a large portion of your final grade (30%); therefore silence will not serve you well in this class.  Since I cannot tell you what these texts mean, your success depends--to a great extent--on your willingness to engage with the texts and with your fellow classmates. No one has the final, correct, absolute interpretation of these books. I invite you to take risks, to challenge yourself, and to share your understanding of each novel or film. I also reserve the right to give spontaneous, in-class quizzes if silence appears to be a lack of preparedness.

Attendance Policy: Three absences will drop you a full letter grade (an A will become a B, etc.); four or more absences will guarantee your failure of this class.

WGS F345 • Virginia Woolf

89230 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm PAR 303
(also listed as E F349S )
show description

Instructor:  Carter, M            Areas:  I / H

Unique #:  83670            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Summer 2012, first session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  WGS 345            Computer Instruction:  No

E 370W (Topic 10: Major Authors: Virginia Woolf) may not also be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course will examine some of the major critical and fictional works of Virginia Woolf. We will start with Woolf’s modernist manifestos (essays) and selections from Woolf’s short stories; we will also read three of Woolf’s major novels. Some of the areas of inquiry the class will be exploring are the value and limitations of high modernism, aesthetics and politics, English literary heritage and tradition, and feminism (Woolf’s critiques of patriarchy, war, fascism).

Texts: Selected essays, including “Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown” (1923) and “Modern Fiction” (1925).

The Complete Shorter Fiction of Virginia Woolf; Jacob’s Room (1922); To the Lighthouse (1927); The Waves (1931)

Requirements & Grading: Three 2-3-page critical analysis essays (30% of final grade); regular Reading quizzes (20% of final grade); Mid-session objective exam (20% of final grade); active, substantial and significant participation (30% of final grade).

In order to succeed in this class, you must make sure that you keep up with the reading assignments; if you are too busy to do heavy reading, you might want to enroll in another class. This is an analysis and discussion based course and you absolutely have to keep up with the syllabus throughout the summer session. Demonstrate that you have completed the required reading and have thought about it--analyzed it closely, rigorously, critically, and creatively. Active and significant participation comprises a substantial portion of your final grade (30%); therefore neither silence nor lack of preparedness will serve you well in this class. Since I cannot tell you what these texts mean, your success depends--to a great extent--on your willingness to engage with the texts and with your fellow classmates. No one has the final, correct, absolute interpretation of these books. I invite you to take risks, to challenge yourself, and to share your understanding of each novel or essay.

Attendance Policy: Three absences will drop you a full letter grade (an A will become a B, etc.); four or more absences will guarantee your failure of this class.

*No late papers will be accepted; incomplete grades will only be given in cases of documented medical emergencies.

WGS 345 • Virginia Woolf

47207 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 103
(also listed as E 349S )
show description

Course Description: This course will examine the critical and fictional works of Virginia Woolf. We will also be examining Woolf’s continuing legacy and influence. Some of the areas of inquiry the class will be exploring are the value and limitations of high modernism, English literary heritage and tradition, feminism, creative and critical definitions of gender and sexuality, intellectual activism (Woolf’s critiques of patriarchy, war, fascism), Woolf and imperialism-colonialism.

 

 

Possible Texts: Selected essays, including “Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown” and “Modern Fiction;” The Voyage Out; Mrs. Dalloway; Jacob’s Room; To the Lighthouse; Orlando; The Waves; Between the Acts; Three Guineas (long essay).

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