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Dr. Susan Sage Heinzelman, Director 2505 University Avenue, A4900, Burdine Hall 536, Austin Texas 78712 • 512-471-5765

Christine L Williams

Core Faculty Ph.D., University of California - Berkeley

Professor
Christine L Williams

Contact

Biography

Research

Dr. Christine Williams is professor of sociology at the University of Texas at Austin.  She writes on gender, race, and class inequality in the workplace.  Her most recent book, Inside Toyland:  Working, Shopping, and Social Inequality, exposes how these forms of inequality are embedded within consumer culture through an examination of low-wage retail work.  Two previous books focus specifically on gender discrimination at work.  These prior works were based on studies of men and women in nontraditional (gender atypical) occupations, such as men in nursing and women in the U.S. Marine Corps.  She has also studied sexuality, homophobia, and sexual harassment in a wide variety of workplace settings. A co-edited book, Gender & Sexuality in the Workplace, was published in 2010.  She is currently conducting a study (with Professor Chandra Muller) on scientists and engineers in the oil and gas industry.  Dr. Williams edited the journal, Gender and Society, from 2003-06.

Professor Williams teaches course in gender, sexualities, labor and labor movements, and qualitative research methods. She is on leave during the fall, 2014.

Research Subject Headings: Gender, Inequality, Labor, Sexuality

Affiliated Research/Academic Unit


Conference Panel Celebrates Sociologist's Work

posted: Tuesday July 20, 2010

At a recent conference in California, sociologist Christine Williams discussed the broad themes and motivations of her scholarly work in the company of distinguished scholars and honored guests.

WGS 322 • Sociology Of Gender

46535 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CLA 0.112
(also listed as SOC 333K )
show description

Description: 

This course is an introduction to the sociological study of gender in U.S. society.  From the moment of birth, boys and girls are treated differently.  Gender structures the experiences of men and women in all major social institutions, including the family, the workplace, and schools.  We will explore how gender impacts everyone’s lives and life chances.  The central themes of the course are historical changes in gender beliefs and practices; socialization practices that reproduce gender identities; how race/ethnicity, class, and sexuality shape the experience of gender; and the relationship between gender, power, and social inequality.  The goals of the course are:

 

  • To understand the sociological perspective as it relates to gender.  What are gender stereotypes?  How do social institutions, including schools, the mass media, families, and work organizations, treat men and women?  You should be able to discuss how the social environment influences the behavior and experiences of men and women.

 

  • To understand how gender is related to other forms of social inequality.  How do men and women from different racial/ethnic groups, social class positions, and sexual orientations, experience gender inequality?  You should be able to discuss hegemonic, marginalized, and alternative definitions of masculinity and femininity.

 

  • To understand how and why gender norms change over time.  Why are behaviors that were considered “masculine” at one time now considered “feminine”?  What role do social movements (including feminism) play in changing society’s expectations of appropriate behavior for men and women?  How has globalization altered relationships between men and women?

 

  • To develop a deeper appreciation of how your own experiences, views, choices, and opportunities have been shaped by gender.

 

This course carries the UGS flag for Cultural Diversity in the United States, which means that it is “designed to increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one U.S. cultural group that has experienced persistent marginalization.”

 Required Texts

C.J. Pascoe, Dude, You’re a Fag, Univ. of California Press, 2007.

Kristen Schilt, Just one of the guys?, University of Chicago Press, 2010.

Susan Thistle, From Marriage to the Market, Univ. of California Press, 2006.

Sinikka Elliott, Not My Kid. NYU Press, 2012.

Carolina Bank-Muñoz, Transnational Tortillas. ILR Press, 2008.

FILM:  The Education of Shelby Knox (DVD).

Course Requirements

 You must have completed at least 60 hours (junior standing) to take this class.  Students who do not meet this prerequisite will be dropped from the course.

 Students are required to attend all lectures and complete all reading assignments on time.  You are encouraged to participate in class discussion and to attend office hours regularly. 

 I am available to discuss appropriate academic accommodations that you may require as a student with a disability.  Before course accommodations will be made, you may be required to provide documentation to the Office of the Dean of Students, Services for Students with Disabilities.

Grading Policy

Your grade in this class is based on your written work, including three in-class essays and 4-5 homework assignments.  You will be evaluated based on both your mastery of the material and the quality of your writing.  Make-up examinations will be given only to those absent for university-approved reasons. The homework assignments require you to write 2-page essays.   Essay questions will be distributed in class and posted on Blackboard one week before they are due at the beginning of class.  No late assignments will be accepted.

 

            Exam 1                        30%

            Exam 2                        30%

            Exam 3                        20%

            Periodic Homework Assignments 20% (4-5% each)

 

WGS 393 • Readings In Gender & Sexuality

48245 • Spring 2014
Meets M 1200pm-300pm CLA 1.302A
(also listed as SOC 395G )
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This graduate seminar is designed to provide a forum for discussion of recently published books in the sociology of gender and sexuality.  It assumes a graduate-level understanding of sociology and feminist theory.  Readings are organized thematically around the major social institutions, i.e., family, work, religion, politics.  Instructor permission required.

 

WGS 322 • Sociology Of Gender

47735 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 800am-930am GSB 2.122
(also listed as SOC 333K )
show description

Description:

This course examines the social and cultural construction of gender, focusing on women and men in U.S. society.  We will explore how gender is experienced by different groups of men and women, with a focus on race/ethnicity, sexuality, class, and nationality.  The course begins with description of current gender stereotypes in popular culture, and differences in the socialization and education of girls and boys.  Next we will examine gender differences in the workplace, exploring the reasons for the persistent gap in pay between employed men and women.  The third part of the course examines women’s changing relationship to the home and work, including changes in the meanings of marriage and motherhood, with a focus on the lives of impoverished women.  This section also reviews public policy responses to women’s poverty.  The final part of the course examines the impact of globalization on men and women around the world.

Texts:

C.J. Pascoe, Dude, You’re a Fag, Univ. of California Press, 2007.

Kristen Schilt, Just one of the guys?, University of Chicago Press, 2010.

Susan Thistle, From Marriage to the Market, Univ. of California Press, 2006.

Kathryn Edin and Maria Kefalas, Promises I can keep, Univ. of California Press, 2005.

Carolina Bank‐Mu.oz, Transnational Tortillas: Race, Gender, and Shop‐Floor Politics in Mexico

and the United States. ILR Press, 2008.

The Education of Shelby Knox (DVD).

Grading and Requirement:

Grades in the class will be based on three examinations and four homework assignments. The

first two exams are worth 30 percent, and the third is worth 20 percent of the final grade. All

examinations will have an essay format (Blue Books are required). Make‐up examinations will

be given only to those absent for university‐approved reasons. The final 20 percent of the grade

is based on written homework assignments. The assignments require students to write 2‐page

essays. Essay questions will be distributed in class and posted on Blackboard. They will be due

the following class period. No late assignments will be accepted. Evaluations (letter grades) are based on mastery of the material and quality of the writing.

 

WGS 322 • Sociology Of Gender

47050 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 800am-930am GSB 2.122
(also listed as SOC 333K )
show description

Description:

This course examines the social and cultural construction of gender, focusing on women and men in U.S. society.  We will explore how gender is experienced by different groups of men and women, with a focus on race/ethnicity, sexuality, class, and nationality.  The course begins with description of current gender stereotypes in popular culture, and differences in the socialization and education of girls and boys.  Next we will examine gender differences in the workplace, exploring the reasons for the persistent gap in pay between employed men and women.  The third part of the course examines women’s changing relationship to the home and work, including changes in the meanings of marriage and motherhood, with a focus on the lives of impoverished women.  This section also reviews public policy responses to women’s poverty.  The final part of the course examines the impact of globalization on men and women around the world.

Texts:

C.J. Pascoe, Dude, You’re a Fag, Univ. of California Press, 2007.

Kristen Schilt, Just one of the guys?, University of Chicago Press, 2010.

Susan Thistle, From Marriage to the Market, Univ. of California Press, 2006.

Kathryn Edin and Maria Kefalas, Promises I can keep, Univ. of California Press, 2005.

Carolina Bank‐Mu.oz, Transnational Tortillas: Race, Gender, and Shop‐Floor Politics in Mexico

and the United States. ILR Press, 2008.

The Education of Shelby Knox (DVD).

Grading and Requirement:

Grades in the class will be based on three examinations and four homework assignments. The

first two exams are worth 30 percent, and the third is worth 20 percent of the final grade. All

examinations will have an essay format (Blue Books are required). Make‐up examinations will

be given only to those absent for university‐approved reasons. The final 20 percent of the grade

is based on written homework assignments. The assignments require students to write 2‐page

essays. Essay questions will be distributed in class and posted on Blackboard. They will be due

the following class period. No late assignments will be accepted. Evaluations (letter grades) are based on mastery of the material and quality of the writing.

 

WGS 322 • Sociology Of Gender

46920 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 800am-930am CBA 4.328
(also listed as SOC 333K )
show description

Description:

This course examines the social and cultural construction of gender, focusing on women and men in U.S. society.  We will explore how gender is experienced by different groups of men and women, with a focus on race/ethnicity, sexuality, class, and nationality.  The course begins with description of current gender stereotypes in popular culture, and differences in the socialization and education of girls and boys.  Next we will examine gender differences in the workplace, exploring the reasons for the persistent gap in pay between employed men and women.  The third part of the course examines women’s changing relationship to the home and work, including changes in the meanings of marriage and motherhood, with a focus on the lives of impoverished women.  This section also reviews public policy responses to women’s poverty.  The final part of the course examines the impact of globalization on men and women around the world. 

Required Texts:

C.J. Pascoe, Dude, You're a Fag, Univ. of California Press, 2007.

Christine Williams, Still a Man's World, Univ. of California Press, 1995.

Susan Thistle, From Marriage to the Market, Univ. of California Press, 2006.

Kathryn Edin and Maria Kefalas, Promises I can keep, Univ. of California Press, 2005.

Carolina Bank-Muñoz, Transnational Tortillas:  Race, Gender, and Shop-Floor Politics in Mexico and the United States. ILR Press, 2008.

 

WGS 393 • Readings In Gender & Sexuality

47888 • Spring 2011
Meets W 1200pm-300pm BUR 231
(also listed as SOC 395G )
show description

This course offers an overview of sociological theory and research on gender and sexuality.  The first part focuses on the history of sociological theory on gender and sexuality, followed by a discussion of classic works on the subject.  The second half of the class will concentrate on new works and current debates.  Among the topics we discuss are:  gay and lesbian families; (trans)gender in the workplace; transnational sex work.

 

Students are expected to have a basic background in sociology and/or feminist theory prior to taking this class.  Enrollment is limited to sociology graduate students.  Others must request special written permission from the instructor to enroll in the class.

 

WGS 322 • Sociology Of Gender

47055 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 800am-930am CBA 4.328
(also listed as SOC 333K )
show description

Description:

This course examines the social and cultural construction of gender, focusing on women and men in U.S. society.  We will explore how gender is experienced by different groups of men and women, with a focus on race/ethnicity, sexuality, class, and nationality.  The course begins with description of current gender stereotypes in popular culture, and differences in the socialization and education of girls and boys.  Next we will examine gender differences in the workplace, exploring the reasons for the persistent gap in pay between employed men and women.  The third part of the course examines women’s changing relationship to the home and work, including changes in the meanings of marriage and motherhood, with a focus on the lives of impoverished women.  This section also reviews public policy responses to women’s poverty.  The final part of the course examines the impact of globalization on men and women around the world. 

Required Texts:

C.J. Pascoe, Dude, You're a Fag, Univ. of California Press, 2007.

Christine Williams, Still a Man's World, Univ. of California Press, 1995.

Susan Thistle, From Marriage to the Market, Univ. of California Press, 2006.

Kathryn Edin and Maria Kefalas, Promises I can keep, Univ. of California Press, 2005.

Carolina Bank-Muñoz, Transnational Tortillas:  Race, Gender, and Shop-Floor Politics in Mexico and the United States. ILR Press, 2008.

 


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