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Dr. Susan Sage Heinzelman, Director 2505 University Avenue, A4900, Burdine Hall 536, Austin Texas 78712 • 512-471-5765

Fehintola (Tola) Mosadomi

Core Faculty Ph.D., 1998, Interdisciplinary Linguistics and Yoruba Phonology, Tulane University

Assistant Professor
Fehintola (Tola) Mosadomi

Contact

Biography

Fehintola Mosadomi is assistant professor in the Department of Middle Eastern Studies.

She holds a Ph.D. in interdisciplinary linguistics with a minor in Francophone studies from Tulane University, with two master’s degrees from the University of Delaware.

Her research interests include Yoruba language, culture and history, Yoruba women and Creole studies.

Dr. Mosadomi is a poet, who has authored several articles in books and journals on Creole studies, African language and gender, African linguistics and pedagogy. She is completing her manuscript on Yoruba grammar.

Dr. Mosadomi was awarded the Dana-Dartmouth Fellowship, was a Fellow at the Center for Research on Women at Tulane University, and is a Faculty Fellow at the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. She received a grant from Liberal Arts Instructional Technology Services for Yoruba technology.

Courses taught:
First Year Yoruba I, First Year Yoruba II, Second Year Yoruba I, Second Year Yoruba II, Yoruba Women, Yoruba History and Culture

Recent Publications:"Food and Language: African Roots of American Southern Culture." In Toyin Falola, ed. Restless Minds. Forthcoming 2007.

"Cultural Continuity: Masking Traditions of the Black Mardi Gras Indians and Yoruba Egungun." Joyce Jackson and Fehintola Mosadomi in Toyin Falola and Ann Genova, eds. Orisa: Yoruba Gods and Spirituality in Africa and the Diaspora. New Jersey: Africa Wold Press, Inc., 2005.

"A Salute to the African Woman." In Alfred Fayemi, ed. Windows to the Soul: Photographs Celebrating African Women. New York: Albofa Press, 2003.

"Marriage, Women and Tradition in Guillaume Oyono Mbia's 'Three Suitors: One Husband"' in electronic journal West Africa Review. Ed. Nkiru Nzegwu, (Special Issue) 2:1, 2000.

WGS 340 • Gndr In North & West Africa

46655 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 103
(also listed as AFR 372G, ISL 373, MEL 321, MES 342 )
show description

This course seeks to develop in students an understanding and appreciation of African gender theories through an examination of the variables between the realities of African gender perspectives and current gender theories. Students should engage in effective and meaningful dialogue that not only affects Africa but also the West, thus increasing an awareness in cross-cultural gender issues.

Texts

Akinwumi Isola. Efu nseta n Ani wu ra, Iya lo de Ibadan and Tinu ubu ,Iya lo de Egba : Two Yoruba  Historical Dramas. Trans. Pamela Olubunmi Smith. Trenton, N.J.: Africa World Press Inc., 2005. - Ba , Mariama. So Long a Letter. Trans. Modupe Bode-Thomas. London and Nairobi: Heinemann, 1981. - Djebar, Assia. Fantasia: An Algerian Calvacade. Trans. Dorothy Blair. London: Quartet Books, 1989. Trans of L'Amour, la fantasia. -Oyo no-Mbia, Guillaume. "Three Suitors, One Husband" in Faces of African Independence: Three Plays. Charlottesville, 1988.

Grading

Attendance and Participation: 10% Individual Term Paper 40% Individual Oral Presentation 15% Group Term Paper 20% Group Oral Presentation 15%

WGS 340 • Gndr In North & West Africa

48045 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 1.206
(also listed as AFR 372G, MEL 321, MES 342 )
show description

The course seeks to develop in students an understanding and appreciation of African gender theories through an examination of the variables between the realities of African gender perspectives and current gender theories. Students should engage in effective and meaningful dialogue that not only affects Africa but also the West, thus increasing an awareness in cross-cultural gender issues.

Texts

Akinwumi Isola. Efu nseta n Ani wu ra, Iya lo de Ibadan and Tinu ubu ,Iya lo de Egba : Two Yoruba  Historical Dramas. Trans. Pamela Olubunmi Smith. Trenton, N.J.: Africa World Press Inc., 2005. - Ba , Mariama. So Long a Letter. Trans. Modupe Bode-Thomas. London and Nairobi: Heinemann, 1981. - Djebar, Assia. Fantasia: An Algerian Calvacade. Trans. Dorothy Blair. London: Quartet Books, 1989. Trans of L'Amour, la fantasia. -Oyo no-Mbia, Guillaume. "Three Suitors, One Husband" in Faces of African Independence: Three Plays. Charlottesville, 1988.

Grading

Attendance and Participation: 10% Individual Term Paper 40% Individual Oral Presentation 15% Group Term Paper 20% Group Oral Presentation 15%

WGS 301 • Yoruba Women

47680 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm PAR 301
(also listed as AFR 317C )
show description

Course Description:

In the past couple of decades, African women’s/ gender studies have increasingly becomea focus of inquiry in many spheres--- socio-economic, political, religious, and cultural.However, Western feminist and womanist perspectives and theoretical frameworks havedominated the studies and analyses of African women’s lives. This course, whichfocuses on Yorùbá women, will examine gender construction in Yorùbáland and furtherexplore the differences between Western gender construction and African notions ofgender. For many centuries before colonization, the Yorùbá of southwestern Nigeria hada history of statehood supported by different categories of power--- military, religious,and political. By analyzing the religious, linguistic, and socio-political aspects of cultural,and socio-political aspects of Yorùbá life, the course will shed light on gender relations inYorubaland and revisit the construction- -African/Yoruba womanhood in extantscholarship.

Course Objective:

The course seeks to develop in students an understanding andappreciation of African gender theories through an examination of the variables betweenthe realities of African gender perspectives and current gender theories. Students willengage in effective and meaningful dialogue that not only affects Africa but also theWest, thus increasing an awareness in cross-cultural gender issues.

Required Texts: All readings in course packet are required

****(Reading) Course Packets: Available at the UT Copy Center, TX Union,Room 2.214, 2247 Guadalupe Phone: 475-6675Akinwumi Isola. Efúnsetán Aníwúrà, Ìyálóde Ègbá: Two Yorùbá Historical Dramas.Translated from the Yorùbá. Pamela Olubunmi Smith, translator. Trenton, N.J.:Africa World Press Inc., 2005.

Cheryl Johnson-Odim and Nina Emma Mba. For Women and the Nation:Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti of Nigeria, Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1997.

Grading Policy:

Attendance and Participation: 10%

Assigned Readings (with brief summary and reactions) 10%

Individual Term Paper 25%

Individual Oral Presentation 15%

Group Term Paper 25%

Group Oral Presentation 15%

A = 94-100A- = 90-93B+ = 88-89B = 85-87B- = 80-84C+ = 78-79C = 75-77C- = 70-74D+ = 68-69D = 65-67D- = 60-64F = 59-0

Individual Term Paper

There will be a mid-semester term paper of 5 to 7 pages (minus bibliography). A topic will beassigned by the professor. If you have difficulties researching and writing, see me or go to thewriting center as soon as possible for help.

Group Term PaperThere will be an end of semester term paper of 10 to 12 pages (minus bibliography). No lateterm papers will be accepted. Students will be placed in groups and a topic will be assigned toeach group by the professor.

All term papers (group and individual) should be turned in to me in class only.

Assigned Readings

Required readings will be assigned to each student throughout the semester. These assignedreadings (with a brief summary of about 2-3pages typed written to be turned in on the day ofpresentation) get all students engaged.

Oral Presentation:

In the middle of the semester, there will be an individual oral presentation of each student’sfinal term paper. At the end of the semester, there will be an oral presentation of group termpapers. Oral presentation, like the term paper, should be structured: introduction, body, andconclusion. No YouTube presentations. You need permission from the professor if you will usetechnology for presentation of your work, which means—come to class early to prepare the useof the consul.-No student shall read from his or her paper. Prepare to use flashcards or speak spontaneously.

Video:Films / documentaries will be watched in class, followed by discussions.

WGS 301 • Yoruba Women

47000 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 101
(also listed as AFR 317C )
show description

In the last two to three decades, African Gender Studies, as a focus of inquiry, have dominated socio-political, religious, moral, and academic discourses inside and outside of Africa. In the realm of African gender studies, the theory of African feminism is grounded in African historical and cultural experience in the sense that it highlights the African woman’s needs, hopes, and desires, and therefore, the terms ‘Africana Womanism’ or ‘African Womanism’.However, Western-based feminist theoretical concepts and analytical perspectives, including the womanist theory in the African Diaspora, have often been applied to most available body of works. If gender is a social construction, how applicable are Western concepts of gender to gender issues in Africa, and how valid are such concepts? These questions form the basic arguments for this course in which Yoruba women will be the focus of discussion.  The Yoruba of Nigeria, West Africa, have for the past five centuries a history of organized statehood, military, and political power before the European scramble for Africa, which was followed by re-organization of African peoples, cultures, and state boundaries for the purposes of colonization. Within this historical context, the course will explore the gender construction in Yoruba land. Also, through the analyses of religious, linguistic, and socio-political discourse and practices among the Yoruba, the course will also examine the variables between the realities of African gender perspectives and current gender theories.

WGS 301 • Yoruba Women

46875 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 101
(also listed as AFR 317C )
show description

In the last two to three decades, African Gender Studies, as a focus of inquiry, have dominated socio-political, religious, moral, and academic discourses inside and outside of Africa. In the realm of African gender studies, the theory of African feminism is grounded in African historical and cultural experience in the sense that it highlights the African woman’s needs, hopes, and desires, and therefore, the terms ‘Africana Womanism’ or ‘African Womanism’.However, Western-based feminist theoretical concepts and analytical perspectives, including the womanist theory in the African Diaspora, have often been applied to most available body of works. If gender is a social construction, how applicable are Western concepts of gender to gender issues in Africa, and how valid are such concepts? These questions form the basic arguments for this course in which Yoruba women will be the focus of discussion.  The Yoruba of Nigeria, West Africa, have for the past five centuries a history of organized statehood, military, and political power before the European scramble for Africa, which was followed by re-organization of African peoples, cultures, and state boundaries for the purposes of colonization. Within this historical context, the course will explore the gender construction in Yoruba land. Also, through the analyses of religious, linguistic, and socio-political discourse and practices among the Yoruba, the course will also examine the variables between the realities of African gender perspectives and current gender theories.

WGS 301 • Yoruba Women

47025 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 101
(also listed as AFR 317C )
show description

AFR 317C YORUBA WOMEN

In the last two to three decades, African Gender Studies, as a focus of inquiry, have dominated socio-political, religious, moral, and academic discourses inside and outside of Africa. African Gender Studies are grounded in the theory of African Feminism which highlights the needs, hopes and desires of African women. This approach to African Feminism has best been labeled African Womanism.

Western-based feminist theoretical concepts and analytical perspectives have typically excluded the realties of African women. If gender is a social construction, how applicable are Western concepts of gender to gender issues in Africa, and how valid are such concepts? These questions form the basic arguments for this course in which Yoruba women will be the focus of discussion.  The Yoruba of Nigeria, West Africa, have a history of organized statehood, and military and political power that predates colonization. While considering this historical context and integrating contemporary perspectives, the course will explore the gender construction in Yoruba-land. Through the analysis of religion, linguistic structure and socio-political discourse, the course will examine the realities of African gender perspectives and current gender theories.

 

Possible Texts and Readings:

Nnaemeka, Obioma.  Sisterhood: Feminisms and Power. New Jersey: Africa World Press Inc., 1998.

 

Ogundipe-Leslie. Re-Creating Ourselves: African Women and Critical Transformation. New Jersey: African World Press Inc., 1994.

 

Olajubu, Oyeronke. Women in the Yoruba Religious Sphere. Albany: State University of New York University Press, 2003.

 

Oyewumi, O. The Invention of Women. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1999.

 

Smith, Pamela. Efunsetan Aniwura and Olu Omo Tinuubu. New Jersey: Africa World Press Inc., 2005


 

WGS 301 • Yoruba Women

48665 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm PAR 101
(also listed as AFR 317C )
show description

Exploration of indigenous and contemporary societies of Africa south of the Sahara, designed to provide students with an understanding of the diversity of the societies and cultures of Africa. Focuses on the precolonial, colonial, and postcolonial historical, political, economic, and sociocultural issues that have determined and shaped the lives of the people.

 

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