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Dr. Susan Sage Heinzelman, Director 2505 University Avenue, A4900, Burdine Hall 536, Austin Texas 78712 • 512-471-5765

Edmund T. Gordon

Associate Faculty Ph.D., Stanford University

Chair and Associate Professor of African and African Diaspora Studies, Associate Professor Anthropology
Edmund T. Gordon

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Biography

Edmund T. Gordon is chair of the African and African Diaspora Studies Department and Associate Professor African and African Diaspora Studies and Anthropology of the African Diaspora at The University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Gordon is also the former Associate Vice President of Thematic Initiatives and Community Engagement of the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement as well as former Director of the Center for African and African American Studies at The University of Texas. His teaching and research interests include: Culture and power in the African Diaspora, gender studies (particularly Black males), critical race theory, race education, and the racial economy of space and resources. His publications include Disparate Diasporas: Identity and Politics in an African-Nicaraguan Community, 1998 UT Press. Dr. Gordon received his Doctorate in Social Anthropology from Stanford University and his Master's of Arts from Stanford University in Anthropology and Master's degree in Marine Sciences from the University of Miami.

Additional Affiliations:

African and African Diaspora Studies Department, Warfield Center for African and African American Studies, Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies 

Interests

Culture and power in the African Diaspora, gender studies (particularly Black males), critical race theory, race education, and the racial economy of space and resources

WGS 340 • Black Male Crisis

46046 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm CLA 1.104
(also listed as AFR 374D, ANT 324L )
show description

This course focuses on the “Crisis” of African American males in the U.S. In doing so it explores patriarchy, gender relations, and stereotypes as they affect black women and men. The course will use black culture as a means of exploring the different ways in which black men and women encounter anti-black racism in this society, the ways in which they resist, and the impact this has on their everyday experiences and cultural practices. The emphasis on patriarchy in the black communities is a theoretical stance that understands gender as a social construction that orders power inequalities in human societies in articulation with processes of race and class. The course shows how this frames black everyday cultural practices, the interactions between black men and women, and the ways that black men and women are perceived by the larger society.

Grading breakdown:

Take Home Exam 1 – 25%

Take Home Exam 2 – 25%

Essays (5-10 pages, 2) – 40%

Attendance and Participation – 10%

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