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Lisa Moore Interim, Director 2505 University Avenue, A4900, Burdine Hall 536, Austin Texas 78712 • 512-471-5765

Jacqueline M Henkel

Associate Faculty Ph.D., 1985, University of Minnesota

Associate Professor
Jacqueline M Henkel

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Biography

Research Interests: Her academic interests include the relation of linguistics to literary criticism; ordinary language philosophy; narrative theory; and language and gender.

Recent Publications: Professor Henkel has written for the journals Poetics, Journal of Literary Semantics, College English, and PMLA, and she has published a full-length study of linguistics in Area X (entitled The Language of Criticism) with Cornell University Press. She is currently working on attitudes toward American Indian languages in 17th century linguistic culture.

Department of English in The College of Liberal Arts

WGS 345 • Women In Captivity

47880 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 1.212
(also listed as E 370W )
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 Instructor:  Henkel, J

Unique #:  35930

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  WGS 345

Flags:  Cultural Diversity; Writing

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: In this course we will read captivity narratives by and about women. We will begin with an early American best-seller, a 17th century Puritan woman's account of her captivity among the Native Americans of New England. Later in the course we will read (or view) examples of this particularly American genre as it recurs in later autobiography, fiction, and film. We will read these narratives not just for the remarkable personal experiences they depict, but also for the cultural values, concerns, and anxieties they encode, particularly as these relate to experiences and outcomes imagined as possible for women.

Texts: (tentative list): --Michel Rene Hilliard d’Auberteuil, Miss McCrea: A Novel of the American Revolution (on-line). --Kathryn Zabelle Derounian-Stodola, ed., Women’s Indian Captivity Narratives. --Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl. --Deborah Larsen, The White. --Toni Morrison, A Mercy. --Susannah Haswell Rowson, Slaves in Algiers: Struggle for Freedom. --Catherine Maria Sedgwick, Hope Leslie. --Monica Sone, Nisei Daughter. --other on-line readings (Angela Carter, Louise Erdrich, Sherman Alexie); secondary readings on-line (Axtell, Ebersole, Namias, etc.). --Film excerpts in class: Last of the Mohicans, Dances with Wolves, etc. --Films: Come See the Paradise, Not Without My Daughter (required to view outside of class)

Requirements & Grading: Minimum requirements are: 1) satisfactory work on quizzes (20%); 2) a passing average score on exams (two; no exam may be missed) (20% each; 40% total); 3) minor written and oral exercises, most to be completed in class (10%); 4) a course paper of 5-6 pages, in two drafts (20%); and 5) an abstract of 1-2 pages and (depending on class size) an oral presentation on secondary material (10%).

Attendance, class preparation, informed discussion, and courteous classroom behavior are considered essential, and unsatisfactory marks in these areas are deducted from the final average. Final grades include "plus" or "minus" grades.

WGS 345 • Women In Captivity

47375 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 303
(also listed as E 370W )
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Instructor:  Henkel, J            Areas:  III / G

Unique #:  35645            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  WGS 345            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: In this course we will read captivity narratives by and about women. We will begin with an early American bestseller, a 17th-century Puritan woman's account of her captivity among the Native Americans of New England. Later in the course we will read (or view) examples of this particularly American genre as it recurs in later autobiography, fiction, and film. We will read these narratives not just for the remarkable personal experiences they depict, but also for the cultural values, concerns, and anxieties they encode, particularly as these relate to experiences and outcomes imagined as possible for women.

Texts:

--Michel Rene Hilliard d’Auberteuil, Miss McCrea: A Novel of the American Revolution (on Blackboard).

--Kathryn Zabelle Derounian-Stodola, ed., Women’s Indian Captivity Narratives.

--Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl.

--Deborah Larsen, The White.

--Toni Morrison, A Mercy.

--Susannah Haswell Rowson, Slaves in Algiers: Struggle for Freedom.

--Catherine Maria Sedgwick, Hope Leslie.

--Monica Sone, Nisei Daughter.

--other Blackboard readings (Angela Carter, Louise Erdrich, Sherman Alexie); secondary readings on Blackboard (Axtell, Ebersole, Namias, etc.).

--Films or film excerpts: Last of the Mohicans; Dances with Wolves; Not Without My Daughter.

Requirements & Grading: Minimum requirements are: 1) satisfactory work on quizzes (20%); 2) a passing average score on exams (two; no exam may be missed) (20% each; 40% total); 3) minor written and oral exercises, most to be completed in class (10%); 4) a course paper (in two drafts) (20%); and 5) an abstract of 1-2 pages and (depending on class size) an oral presentation on secondary material (10%).

Attendance, class preparation, informed discussion, and courteous classroom behavior are considered essential, and unsatisfactory marks in these areas are deducted from the final average. Final grades include "plus" or "minus" grades.

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