Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
cwgs masthead
Dr. Susan Sage Heinzelman, Director 2505 University Avenue, A4900, Burdine Hall 536, Austin Texas 78712 • 512-471-5765

Jennifer Glass

Associate Faculty Ph.D., University of Wisconsin

Jennifer Glass

Contact

Biography

Jennifer Glass is the Barbara Bush Professor of Liberal Arts in the Department of Sociology at the University of Texas, Austin.. She has published over 50 articles and books on work and family issues, gender stratification in the labor force, mother’s employment and mental health, and religious conservatism and women’s economic attainment, with funding from the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. Her most recent projects explore the wage effects of flexible work practices, how telecommuting facilitates longer work hours for employees, and whether governmental work-family policies improve or undermine parents’ mental and physical health, all as part of a larger project to understand the roots of mothers’ disadvantage in the labor market.

WGS 301 • Fertility And Reproduction

46505 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 0.130
(also listed as SOC 307K )
show description

Description

Why do birth rates rise and fall?  How can the U.S. have both record rates of childlessness as well as the highest rates of teen childbearing and unwanted pregnancy in the industrialized world?  Why does educating women lower birth rates faster than any population control program in the Third World?  This course will explore when, why, how, and with whom Americans bear children, and how we compare to other developed and developing countries in the world.  We will explore infertility and its treatments, the ethics of surrogacy, voluntary childlessness, the rapid rise of nonmarital childbearing in the U.S. and other countries, the politics of childbirth and risks of maternal mortality in developed and developing countries, and the declining populations and rapid aging  of  rich countries including Japan, Italy, and Spain where women have basically stopped having children. 

WGS 301 • Fertility And Reproduction

47885 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 0.112
(also listed as SOC 308 )
show description

Description

Why do birth rates rise and fall?  How can the U.S. have both record rates of childlessness as well as the highest rates of teen childbearing and unwanted pregnancy in the industrialized world?  Why does educating women lower birth rates faster than any population control program in the Third World?  This course will explore when, why, how, and with whom Americans bear children, and how we compare to other developed and developing countries in the world.  We will explore infertility and its treatments, the ethics of surrogacy, voluntary childlessness, the rapid rise of nonmarital childbearing in the U.S. and other countries, the politics of childbirth and risks of maternal mortality in developed and developing countries, and the declining populations and rapid aging  of  rich countries including Japan, Italy, and Spain where women have basically stopped having children. 

WGS 301 • Fertility And Reproduction

47200 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 0.130
(also listed as SOC 308 )
show description

Description

 

Why do birth rates rise and fall?  How can the U.S. have both record rates of childlessness as well as the highest rates of teen childbearing and unwanted pregnancy in the industrialized world?  Why does educating women lower birth rates faster than any population control program in the Third World?  This course will explore when, why, how, and with whom Americans bear children, and how we compare to other developed and developing countries in the world.  We will explore infertility and its treatments, the ethics of surrogacy, voluntary childlessness, the rapid rise of nonmarital childbearing in the U.S. and other countries, the politics of childbirth and risks of maternal mortality in developed and developing countries, and the declining populations and rapid aging  of  rich countries including Japan, Italy, and Spain where women have basically stopped having children. 

bottom border