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Dr. Susan Sage Heinzelman, Director 2505 University Avenue, A4900, Burdine Hall 536, Austin Texas 78712 • 512-471-5765

Julie Hardwick

Associate Faculty Ph.D., 1991, Johns Hopkins University

Professor
Julie Hardwick

Contact

Biography

Research interests

Her main areas of interest are early modern social and cultural history, legal history, and women's history.

Courses taught

She teaches early modern European history, especially France; gender/family and legal history.

WGS F345 • Witches, Workers, And Wives

88495 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm WEL 2.304
(also listed as EUS F346, HIS F343W )
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Varies by topic/section.

WGS 345 • Witches, Workers, And Wives

47195 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm WEL 2.304
(also listed as EUS 346, HIS 343W )
show description

Our stereotypical image of an early modern woman is a witch - for some good reasons because thousands of witch trials took place. In this course, we will look beyond that perspective to explore the complex of material, political, and cultural factors that shaped experiences of gender and family and that shaped attitudes about gender and power in early modern Europe. The early modern centuries between about 1500 and 1800 were years of tremendous change in many ways - religious reformations, European governments became more powerful at home and established colonies world wide, economic transformation as people became consumers and production expanded exponentially. Some features were slower to change, however, especially with regard to family life. In this class, we will explore how women's experiences of these patterns compared to men's - whether as workers, consumers, criminals, political subjects and political actors, peasants or nobles, spouses or parents. Along the way, we will explore why some of these dynamics fed into a proliferation of "witches."

WGS 340 • Law/Society Early Mod Europe

46980 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 330pm-500pm GAR 2.128
(also listed as EUS 346, HIS 350L )
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This research seminar will focus on how historians have explored the significance of law, criminal and civil, in the lives of early modern Europeans. We will explore how historians have used legal records to explore patterns of criminality (which were very highly gendered at the time, for example infanticide and fornication for women and drunkenness and theft for men) and rapidly growing rates of civil litigation (for instance over debt, slander and family disputes of various kinds).   We will investigate how historians have used court cases to examine a wide variety of issues for which few other sources survive, especially in terms of everyday social, cultural and economic patterns for families and communities.  We will combine reading the work of historians with our own readings of cases as preliminaries to research projects in which students will work on a case of their own choosing for their term papers.

 

Grading:

Research papers 60% (5% proposal, 20% paper, 35% revised paper)

Peer review of research paper 5%

Group projects 20%

Participation 15% (attendance, informed discussion, engagement with

presentations, leading discussion)

 

Reading:

Readings will be assigned for most class meetings in the first part of the semester until we move to working on the research projects.  The readings will be a mixture of journal articles (available on line through the PCL website), original legal documents (posted on BlackBoard) and a course packet to be purchased.

For some basic background into early modern Europe, I recommend: Euan Cameron, ed., Early Modern Europe: an Oxford History (in the PCL and widely available on line either new or used). 

WGS S345 • Witches, Workers, And Wives

89480 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am WEL 2.304
(also listed as EUS S346, HIS S343W )
show description

Our stereotypical image of an early modern woman is a witch - for some good reasons because thousands of witch trials took place.  In this course, we will look beyond that perspective to explore the complex of material, political, and cultural factors that shaped experiences of gender and family and that shaped attitudes about gender and power in early modern Europe.  The early modern centuries between about 1500 and 1800 were years of tremendous change in many ways - religious reformations, European governments became more powerful at home and established colonies world wide, economic transformation as people became consumers and production expanded exponentially.  Some features were slower to change, however, especially with regard to family life.  In this class, we will explore how women's experiences of these patterns compared to men's - whether as workers, consumers, criminals, political subjects and political actors, peasants or nobles, spouses or parents.  Along the way, we will explore why some of these dynamics fed into a proliferation of "witches."

Texts

Discussion of the assigned readings (see below) will be an important element of this class: you will learn more effectively when you take an active part in the analysis of the material to be covered.  Consequently you must expect to read every reading assignment very carefully and thoughtfully.  You should come to each class ready to ask questions and contribute observations.

You will need to demonstrate mastery of the readings to do well on the exams. 

Warning: absence from class will inevitably have a serious impact on your grade because you cannot participate if you are not present. Each of you may be absent twice with no penalty.  For every absence after that, three points will be deducted from your participation grade for each absence not justified by a written explanation. Please note, however, that attendance is the only the first prerequisite for participation, so that perfect attendance and complete silence will result in a grade that reflects only partial fulfillment of participation.

Daily class readings are available on electronic reserve (ER) or online through the Library Catalogue (both accessible through the library homepage) or in a xerox packet.  

 

Grading

Midterm     25%

Final       35%

Reading grids 20%

Witchcraft group projects   10%

Participation  10%          

WGS 345 • Witches, Workers, And Wives

47791 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am WAG 201
(also listed as EUS 346, HIS 343W )
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WGS 345 • Witches, Workers, And Wives

48025 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm WEL 2.304
(also listed as EUS 346, HIS 343W )
show description

HIS 343W    Witches, Workers and Wives    Spring 2009
Julie Hardwick

Course Description
Our stereotypical image of an early modern woman is a witch - for some good reasons because thousands of witch trials took place. In this course, we will look beyond that perspective to explore the complex of material, political, and cultural factors that shaped experiences of gender and family and that shaped attitudes about gender and power in early modern Europe. The early modern centuries between about 1500 and 1800 were years of tremendous change in many ways - religious reformations, European governments became more powerful at home and established colonies world wide, economic transformation as people became consumers and production expanded exponentially. Some features were slower to change, however, especially with regard to family life. In this class, we will explore how women's experiences of these patterns compared to men's - whether as workers, consumers, criminals, political subjects and political actors, peasants or nobles, spouses or parents. Along the way, we will explore why some of these dynamics fed into a proliferation of "witches."

Grading Policy
Assignments may include: responses to readings, one paper, exams, and a group project.

Texts
Readings may include the following books and a number of articles:
Judith Bennett, Ale, Beer, and Brewsters: Women's Work in a Changing World, 1300-1600
Steven Ozment, The Burgermeister's Daughter: Scandal in a Sixteenth-Century German Town
Joseph Klaits, Servants of Satan: The Age of the Witch Hunts
The Memoirs of Gluckel of Hameln, Robert Rosen., ed.

Publications

BOOK: Family Business: litigation and the political ecnomies of daily life in seventeenth-century France, (Oxford University Press, 2009).

CHAPTER: "The Family and the State," in Sandra Cavello, editor, A Cultural History of Childhood and Family in the early modern age, (in production; Berg, 2009).

CHAPTER: "Between State and Street: Witnesses and the Family Politics of Litigation in Early Modern France," Family, Gender, and Law in early modern France, ed. by Suzanne Desan and Jeffrey Merrick (Penn State University Press, 2009).

ARTICLE: "Review of Meat Matters: Butchers, Politics, and Market Culture in Eighteenth-Century Paris," H-France 9(77), (June, 2009).

ARTICLE: "Sex and the (seventeenth-century) century city: a research note towards the long history of leisure," Leisure Studies, (October, 2008).

ARTICLE: "Review of The familial state: ruling families and merchant capitalism in early modern Europe," American Historical Review, (April, 2007).

ARTICLE: "Review of Between Crown and Community: Politics and Civic Culture in Sixteenth-Century Poitiers," Journal of Modern History, 78(4), 954-955, (December, 2006).

BOOK: The Practice of Patriarchy: Gender and the Politics of Household Authority in early modern France, (Published simultaneously in cloth and paper, Penn State Press, 1998).

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