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Robert Oppenheim, Director WCH 4.134, Mailcode G9300, Austin, TX 78712 78712 • 512-471-5811

Madeline Y. Hsu

Associate Professor Ph.D., Yale University

Associate Professor; Department of History
Madeline Y. Hsu

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Biography

Madeline Y. Hsu served as Director of the Center for Asian American Studies 2006-2014 and is currently an Associate Professor of History at the University of Texas at Austin.  She was born in Columbia, Missouri but grew up in Taiwan and Hong Kong between visits with her grandparents at their store in Altheimer, Arkansas.  She received her undergraduate degrees in History from Pomona College and PhD from Yale University.  Her first monograph, Dreaming of Gold, Dreaming of Home: Transnationalism and Migration Between the United States and South China, 1882-1943 (Stanford University Press, 2000) received the 2002 Association for Asian American Studies History Book Award.  Her edited anthologies include Chinese Americans and the Politics of Culture, with Sucheng Chan (Temple University Press, 2008) and Chinese American Transnational Politics (University of Illinois Press, 2010) featuring articles by Him Mark Lai.  The Good Immigrants: How the Yellow Peril Became the Model Minority (Princeton University Press, 2015) is her second monograph.  She is currently writing “Asian American History: A Very Short Introduction” for Oxford University Press.

Courses Taught:

  • AAS 325/ HIS 350L: Chinese in Diaspora - W
  • AAS 325/ HIS 340S/ ANS 340S: Chinese in the U.S. - W
  • AAS 325/ HIS 364G/ ANS 361: Taiwan: Colonization, Migration, Identity - W
  • AAS 312/HIS 317L: Introduction to Asian American History
  • AAS 381/HIS 392: Race and Migration

Awards/Honors:

2012 Community Leadership Award, Network of Asian American Organizations and Greater Austin Asian Chamber of Commerce, September 22, 2012.

Distinguished Lecturer, 2012-13, Organization of American Historians. See OAH Distinguished Lectureship Program.

2002 Association for Asian American Studies History Book Award for Dreaming of Gold, Dreaming of Home: Transnationalism and Migration Between the United States and Southern China, 1882-1943 (Stanford University Press, 2000)

   RAISE Awareness Award, Asian/Asian American Faculty Staff Association, UT Austin, 2009.

   HNN Leading Young Historian, 2007

Interests

Asian American studies, migration, transnationalism, and ethnic studies

Publications

   Dreaming of Gold, Dreaming of Home: Transnationalism and Migration Between the United States and South China, 1882-1943.  Stanford University Press, 2000.  Association for Asian American Studies History Book Award, 2002.

  Co-edited with Sucheng Chan.  Chinese Americans and the Politics of Race and Culture.  Temple University Press, 2008.

  Editor. Chinese American Transnational Politics by Him Mark Lai. University of Illinois Press, 2010. Honorable Mention, 2012 Association for Asian American Studies History Book Award.

  The Good Immigrants:  How the Yellow Peril Became a Model Minority.  Princeton University Press, 2015. 

 

Hsu Bookcover

  “Refgees as Resources in Aid Refugee Chinese Intellectuals, Inc. (ARCI) Programs to Support Nationalist Taiwan, 1952-1956,” for “Global Displacements and Emplacement: The Forced Exile and Resettlement Experiences of Ethnic Chinese Refugees,” a special issue of the Journal of Chinese Overseas (2014) 10:2.

   “Chinese and American Collaborations through Educational Exchange during the Era of Exclusion, 1872-1955,” Pacific Historical Review, co-editor of special issue titled “Conversations on Transpacific History,” 83:2 (May 2014): 314-332.

   “The Disappearance of America’s Cold War Chinese Refugees.” Journal of American Ethnic History, 31:4 (Summer, 2012): 12-33.

Online Talks


Chinese Immigration, Public Affairs Forum, First Unitarian Universalist Church

First UU Church of Austin - PAF1314 - U.T. Professor Madeline Hsu
First UU Church of Austin Public Affairs Forum 1314 - 04/07/13 - Madeline Hsu, PhD -"The Origins of Exclusionary Immigration Policy"


How Chinese Immigrants Became Model Minorities: Intellectuals, Refugees, and Immigration Selection, 1908-1962

Madeline Hsu, Monday, November 4, 2013
Associate professor of history; director, Center for Asian American Studies, University of Texas, Austin; editor, Chinese American Transnational Politics (2010) and author, forthcoming Strategic Migrations: Immigration Selection and How the Yellow Peril Became a Model Minority, 1872-1966; "How Chinese Immigrants Became Model Minorities: Intellectuals, Refugees, and Immigration Selection, 1908-1962"


Across the Divide: A Roundtable Discussion on Contemporary Chinese Art

Across the Divide: A Round Table Discussion on Contemporary Chinese Art
In conjunction with the exhibition 'Across the Divide', the Visual Arts Center presents a round table discussion to explore the common thread among the Across the Divide artists as well as the history and direction of contemporary Chinese art today. Discussants for the round table conversation include Amy Lewis Hofland, Director of The Crow Collection, Dallas; Beili Liu, Faculty Host of the Across the Divide exhibition and Associate Professor in Studio Art at The University of Texas at Austin; Dr. Yun–Chiahn C. Sena, Assistant Professor of Chinese Art. UT Austin; Dr. Madeline Hsu, Director of the Center for Asian American Studies and Associate Professor of History, UT Austin, and others. The discussion will be moderated by Dr. Yun-Chiahn C. Sena.

Dr. Yun-Chiahn C. Sena specializes in Chinese art and culture with a focus on the antiquarian movement and literati art and aestheticism after the tenth century. After receiving her Ph.D. in 2007 from the University of Chicago, she joined the faculty of Art and Art History at The University of Texas at Austin. Her dissertation, Pursuing Antiquity: Chinese Antiquarianism from the Tenth to the Thirteen Century, examines the Chinese antiquarian movement with a new methodological approach, which integrates data from art and literary works, archeological findings, and historical documents. Her recent study on Kao gu tu and Bo gu tu, the two most important illustrated antiquarian writings produced before the introduction of modern archeology to China, appeared in Wu Hung, ed. Reinventing the Past: Archaism and Antiquarianism in Chinese Art and Visual Culture in 2008.

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