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Douglas Biow, Director MEZ 3.126, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-3470

Andrew Villalon

Senior Lecturer Ph.D., 1984, Yale University

Andrew Villalon

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-8004
  • Office: GAR 4.120
  • Office Hours: Spring 2011 - M 3-6 p.m., W 3-5 p.m.
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

EUS 346 • Early Western Colonialism

36895 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WEL 2.304
(also listed as HIS 362G )
show description

This course (meeting three times a week) will examine the phenomenon of colonialism, in particular, its most prominent example:  the European Expansion across the globe that began at the end of the western Middle Ages and continued throughout the early modern period.  After looking at earlier colonizing efforts by western peoples, the course will concentrate on the first wave of European colonization (and decolonization) that began with the Portuguese attack on Ceuta in 1415 and ended with the revolutions of Nordfth and South America that encompassed the period from 1775 to the 1820s.  

Course Topics:

Earlier colonizing efforts undertaken by western peoples (Phoenicians, Greeks, Romans, Vikings, Crusaders)

Means and motives for European expansion:  Why Europe and not another region?

The technology behind expansion

The clash of civilizations

Colonial empires established by the “big five” European colonizers—Portugal, Spain, England, France, and Holland:  similarities and differences

Trading Empires vrs. Settlement Empires

Influences on the mother countries

“The Columbian Exchange”

The critical role of disease in European successes and failures

Why decolonization?

Course Readings:

Jared M. Diamond, Guns, Germs, and Steel, The Fate of Human Societies

Alfred W. Crosby, The Columbian Exchange (Any edition)

Several readings posted on the web

Grading

Two in-class exams, 25% each

Final exam during final exam period, 25%

10 page research paper, 25%

EUS 306 • Intro To Hist And Cul Of Spain

36660 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WEL 2.304
(also listed as AHC 310, HIS 306N )
show description

This one-semester course will explore the long history of  Spain from its beginnings in the stone age through the great social and economic upheavals of the twentieth century.  Beginning with an introduction to its geography and language, we shall touch on such topics as paleolithic settlement and art, the arrival of new groups (Celts, Greeks, Phoenicians), the Roman imperium, the Visigothic domination, the Islamic conquest and Christian reconquest (Reconquista), medieval kingdoms and their unification, the separate way of Portugal, the birth and death of  religious toleration, the rise and fall of Spain in the European state system, Hapsburg and Bourbon kings, the troubled nineteenth century and even more troubled twentieth, and finally, the emergence of one of Europe’s most democratic societies.   Wherever possible, the course will attempt to place Spain into the larger context of European and Mediterranean society.  Basic information will be conferred primarily through lectures by the professor.

Texts:

Simon Barton, A History of Spain (Palgrave MacMillan, 2004).

Olivia Remie Constable, Medieval Iberia: Readings from Christian, Muslim, and Jewish Sources (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1997).

John Elliott, Imperial Spain 1469-1715.

Richard Herr, An Historical Essay on Modern Spain.

Grading:

A course paper on some aspect of the history and culture of Spain (8-10 pages).  25%

A portfolio on the history and culture of Spain which should contain text and/or visuals that you find about  fighting in the Middle Ages.  25%

Two tests, 25% each

EUS 346 • Early Western Colonialism

36415 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WEL 2.304
(also listed as HIS 362G )
show description

This course (meeting three times a week) will examine the phenomenon of colonialism, in particular, its most prominent example:  the European Expansion across the globe that began at the end of the western Middle Ages and continued throughout the early modern period.  After looking at earlier colonizing efforts by western peoples, the course will concentrate on the first wave of European colonization (and decolonization) that began with the Portuguese attack on Ceuta in 1415 and ended with the revolutions of Nordfth and South America that encompassed the period from 1775 to the 1820s. 

 

Course Topics:

Earlier colonizing efforts undertaken by western peoples (Phoenicians, Greeks, Romans, Vikings, Crusaders)

Means and motives for European expansion:  Why Europe and not another region?

The technology behind expansion 

The clash of civilizations

Colonial empires established by the “big five” European colonizers—Portugal, Spain, England, France, and Holland:  similarities and differences

Trading Empires vrs. Settlement Empires

Influences on the mother countries

“The Columbian Exchange”

The critical role of disease in European successes and failures

Why decolonization?

 

Course Readings:

Jared M. Diamond, Guns, Germs, and Steel, The Fate of Human Societies

Alfred W. Crosby, The Columbian Exchange (Any edition)

Several readings posted on the web

 

Grading

Two in-class exams, 25% each

Final exam during final exam period, 25%

10 page research paper, 25% 

EUS 306 • Intro To Hist And Cul Of Spain

36365 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WEL 2.308
(also listed as AHC 310, HIS 306N )
show description

This one-semester course will explore the long history of  Spain from its beginnings in the stone age through the great social and economic upheavals of the twentieth century.  Beginning with an introduction to its geography and language, we shall touch on such topics as paleolithic settlement and art, the arrival of new groups (Celts, Greeks, Phoenicians), the Roman imperium, the Visigothic domination, the Islamic conquest and Christian reconquest (Reconquista), medieval kingdoms and their unification, the separate way of Portugal, the birth and death of  religious toleration, the rise and fall of Spain in the European state system, Hapsburg and Bourbon kings, the troubled nineteenth century and even more troubled twentieth, and finally, the emergence of one of Europe’s most democratic societies.   Wherever possible, the course will attempt to place Spain into the larger context of European and Mediterranean society.  Basic information will be conferred primarily through lectures by the professor.

Course Goals:

(1)  To provide students with a firm understanding of the history and culture of the Iberian Peninsula, in particular of  what we today call Spain.  (There will also be some treatment of that part of Spain that maintained its independence in the unifying process and is today the nation of Portugal.)

(2)  To provide some understanding of the various types of evidence available to scholars when they  undertakes to reconstruct the Spanish past

(3)  (Hopefully) To inspire in the student a further interest in the study of Spain, its people, and its history and encourage travel to an ancient and fascinating land

 

Required Reading:

Simon Barton, A History of Spain (Palgrave MacMillan, 2004).

This is the best general text on Spanish history currently available in English.  Even though it is rather "light" on periods before roughly 1000, read in conjunction with the lectures, it should supply the student with an adequate knowledge of Spain's ancient past.

If the student finds it necessary to supplement the Barton text, he/she may have access to a now out-of-print textbook written by one of the finest historians of modern Spain and available FOR FREE  on the web through LIBRO:  The Library of Iberian Resources on Line.  See:  Stanley Payne, A History of Spain and Portugal at URL:  http://libro.uca.edu/payne1/spainport1.htm

Olivia Remie Constable, Medieval Iberia: Readings from Christian, Muslim, and Jewish Sources (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1997).

An excellent collection of sources from medieval Spain, taken from the three great religions that co-existed there as nowhere else in Europe.  (The book is dedicated to John Boswell, the man who saved my academic career.)

There are two other books on the list, both dealing with Spain in what historians designate "the modern period" (c. 1500-the present).  Depending upon where your interests lie, you may choose to read one or the other.  (Of course, I am not seeking to discourage you from reading both if you so desire!)

John Elliott, Imperial Spain 1469-1715

This classic work, written by one of the foremost historians of the twentieth century (still going strong in the twenty-first)  is still the best one volume account that covers the period from Spanish unification under the Catholic Monarchs to the end of the Hapsburg dynasty.

Richard Herr, An Historical Essay on Modern Spain

Written by a leading scholar of Spain since the Enlightenment, this work carries Spain from the establishment of the Bourbon dynasty, established at the beginning of the eighteenth century through the end of the dictatorship of Francisco Franco.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE ACROSS THE CURRICULUM INITIATIVE FOR HISTORY STUDENTS 

 THE DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY IS PLEASED TO OFFER FOR THE FIRST TIME AN **OPTIONAL** ADDITIONAL ONE-HOUR CLASS FOR CREDIT IN SPANISH ATTACHED TO HISTORY 306N: INTRODUCTION TO HISTORY AND CULTURE OF SPAIN. 

Students with intermediate Spanish language skills enrolled in HIS 306N, Intro to History and Culture of Spain, may, if they choose, sign up for a supplemental one-hour class in Spanish, SPN 130D (unique 46555). Students who take this additional course will receive an additional hour's credit in Spanish from the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.  This is a unique opportunity to develop language skills in the context of historical reading. The Department of History encourages interested students to take advantage of this unique opportunity. Time and Place for SPN 130D will be determined according to student availability.

 

EUS 346 • Early Western Colonialism

36274 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WEL 2.312
(also listed as HIS 362G )
show description

This course (meeting three times a week) will examine the phenomenon of colonialism, in particular, its most prominent example:  the European Expansion across the globe that began at the end of the western Middle Ages and continued throughout the early modern period.  After looking at earlier colonizing efforts by western peoples, the course will concentrate on the first wave of European colonization (and decolonization) that began with the Portuguese attack on Ceuta in 1415 and ended with the revolutions of Nordfth and South America that encompassed the period from 1775 to the 1820s. 

 

Course Topics:

Earlier colonizing efforts undertaken by western peoples (Phoenicians, Greeks, Romans, Vikings, Crusaders)

Means and motives for European expansion:  Why Europe and not another region?

The technology behind expansion 

The clash of civilizations

Colonial empires established by the “big five” European colonizers—Portugal, Spain, England, France, and Holland:  similarities and differences

Trading Empires vrs. Settlement Empires

Influences on the mother countries

“The Columbian Exchange”

The critical role of disease in European successes and failures

Why decolonization?

 

Course Readings:

Jared M. Diamond, Guns, Germs, and Steel, The Fate of Human Societies

Alfred W. Crosby, The Columbian Exchange (Any edition)

Several readings posted on the web

 

Grading

Two in-class exams, 25% each

Final exam during final exam period, 25%

10 page research paper, 25% 

EUS 306 • Western Civ In Medieval Times

36259 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WEL 2.304
(also listed as AHC 310, CTI 310, HIS 309K )
show description

Course Description:

This course will introduce students to the history and culture of that long and vibrant period in the western history known as the Middle Ages, a period extending from roughly 400-1500 A.D./C.E.  After briefly considering the Roman and Christian background, it will explore the fall of the Roman Empire in the west, then survey the primary heirs of Roman Society--the Byzantine Empire, Islam, and the Germanic successor kingdoms that gained control of Western Europe.  The course will examine the development of a medieval lifestyle and the changes within it tthat eventually pointed toward the modern world.  Throughout the approach will be broad-based, treating such diverse topics as the organization of medieval society and economy, the class structure, the warfare that characterized the period, the Church, the universities, and the rebirth of an increasingly urbanized culture toward the end of the period.  Emphasis will be placed on how the Middle Ages changed over time.  Students will learn from a combination of lectures and readings in carefully selected sources.

Topics Covered in the Course:

(1)  Background:  The Fall of Rome  (Exam 1)

    The Pax Romana

    The Long Decline

(2)  Background:  Christianity in the Roman World (Exam 2)

    Origins of Christianity

    A Period of Trial

    Triumph of Christianity

    Rise of the Roman Bishop

    Christianity and Heresy

(3)  The Early Middle Ages:  The Heirs of Rome (Exam 3)

    The Byzantine Empire and Islam

    The Triumph of the Franks

    Retreat Into Disorder

(4)  Medieval Society 1:  The Men Who Fought (Nobles, Knights) and the Men Who Worked (Peasants) (Exam 4)

    Aristocratic Lifestyle

    Feudalism

    Peasants and Manorialism

    Medieval Revolution in Agricultural Technology

    Views of the Medieval Peasant

(5)  Medieval Society 2:  The Men Who Prayed (The Medieval Church) (No Exam)

    The Medieval Church

    Spread of Christianity

    Conflict of Church and State

(6)  Medieval Society 3:  The Rise of the Bourgeoisie (The Medieval City) (Exam 5)

Course Goals:

(1)  To provide students with an understanding of the period in western history referred to as the Middle Ages (c. 400-1500).

(2)  To provide some understanding of the various types of evidence available to scholars when they  undertakes to study and reconstruct the medieval past .

(3)  (Hopefully) To inspire in the student a continuing interest in studying this fascinating period.

Course Webpage:

A webpage for Western Civilization in Medieval Times is posted on the teaching section of my website, Wire Paladinhttp://www.webspace.webring.com/people/ca/avillalon/c-MedHist-index.html  Like the rest of my teaching materials, it can be reached by accessing the website's main index, then clicking on the chess knight entitled University of  Texas Courses taught by Dr. Villalon. 

Reading List:

Class Notes

There is no textbook in this course.  Instead, basic course material will be conveyed through a series of highly-developed, easily-available lecture notes, posted on the professor’s website (Wire Paladin, located at Webring).  

In addition, study guides and several required essays containing supplemental material will also be made available on the website.  The study guide has been designed to make studying for exams far easier .  USE IT!

Readings

Student are asked to read the following books in conjunction with the lectures.  Three of them--Einhard, the Song of Roland, and Abelard's Story of my Adversities--rank among the most famous classics of medieval literature.   (The first two--Einhard and the Song of Roland--are required; the third--Abelard--is optional. )  Aside from their inherent value for understanding the Middle Ages and the sources we have for studying its history, these three works have been selected on the basis of such practical considerations as (1) reasonable length and ease of reading; (2) reasonable initial price; (3) availability on the electronic used-book market; (4) availability of good translations  on the web of the three classics--Einhard, the Song of Roland, and Abelard; and (5) possible relevance to other courses on the medieval world that students might pursue in the future.  The fourth work, written by an American professor, Lynn White, Jr., is one of the twentieth century's most innovative pieces of historical writing.

Einhard and Notker the Stammerer:  Two Lives of Charlemagne (Penguin Classics).  Two very different approaches to historical writing in the Middle Ages.  Although relatively brief, Einhard's chronicle of Charlemagne is one of the finest pieces of historical writing produced during the period.  On the other hand, Notker's history of the reign shows some of the significant problems that characterize much of medieval historical writing, especially that which came out of the monasteries.  (Note:  the work may also be listed as Einhard and the Monk of St. Gall:  Two Lives of Charlemagne.  As part of his excellent introduction, the editor makes the argument that the two are one and the same.  While Einhard is available on the web, Notker is not.)

The Song of Roland (Penguin Classics).  One of  the most famous medieval epics or, as they were called by people of the period, Chansons de Geste (Songs of Deeds).  It not only illustrates the ideal of chivalric warfare, but also demonstrates how history can be twisted to fit the author's intent.  (Hollywood has nothing on the Middle Ages!)  (The Song of Roland is also available on the web.)

Peter Abelard, The Story of my Adversities.  One of the great autobiographies in history, it is the very revealing tale of an individual who became one of the major intellectual figures of the twelfth century and whose principal writing, Sic et Non, would help give rise to medieval scholasticism.  (Abelard's story is

Lynn White, Jr.,  Medieval Technology and Social Change (Oxford University Press).  The only assigned reading that is not a medieval source, it is a major piece of twentieth century historical writing emphasizing the importance of technological change in the Middle Ages and combating the long-held view of the period as one without progress.

How the readings are related to the course and to the exams:  The readings are designed primarily to provide a student with a knowledge of several classics of medieval literature and, in the case of White's book, to demonstrate how the period was one of technological change.  While most of each exam will be taken from the posted notes and supplemental essays, in several cases a short section may be based on the readings. 

 

Criteria for Grading:

(1)  Examinations (the major criterion):

     a.  Four in-class examinations (a separate exam for each of topics 1-4)

     b.  The final exam (this exam will not be comprehensive; it will cover only topic 6.  There is no exam on topic 5.

(2)  Written component consisting of a short research paper

(3)  Notable participation will be given some consideration in awarding the grade.

The examinations are entirely short answer (matching, fill-in-the-blank from a list supplied on the exam; true or false).  Students who are simply willing to sit down and learn the material should not find them particularly difficult.  It is the short short paper (5-7 pages) that will provide an opportunity for creativity.

NOTE WELL: Except in extraordinarily rare cases, all work must be completed and handed in to receive a grade other than X or F.

(Do not assume that by simply taking exams and doing well on them, you will have done enough to pass the course and will therefore not have to do the paper.  This is simply not the case.)

 

Grading Procedure:

The grades in this class are computed using  + and -; in other words, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, F.    Unfortunately, however, the University of Texas does not at present have a +/- system in place.  This permits much less flexibility in the professor's ability to assign grades truly representative of the student's work.  Grades will not be rounded upward; in other words, a B+ is a B+, not an A-; therefore, it appears on the student's transcript as a B.

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