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Douglas Biow, Director MEZ 3.126, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-3470

Bernadeta Kaminska

Lecturer M.A.

EUS 347 • Polish Lit & Culture In Film

36996 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am BUR 228
(also listed as C L 323, POL 324, REE 325 )
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Course Description

The course presents the highlights of Polish literature and culture through the works of internationally recognized Polish directors and selected readings.

Students will study major works of Polish literature in the context of Western and East European/Slavic traditions.  The road will start in the Middle Ages, and continue through Renaissance, Baroque, Enlightenment, Romanticism, Positivism, and literature in the 20th century.

Readings include early Polish poetry, short stories, novels, plays and drama. 

All texts, movies, and discussions will be in English.  Students with good knowledge of Polish may read in the original Polish.

Texts:

The History of Polish Literature by Czeslaw Milosz

Selected readings

Movies

Requirements and Grading

10% Attendance

20% Participation

10% Readings Quizzes

10% Movie Quizzes

10% Literary Works Quizzes

20% Project

20% Final Paper

EUS 347 • 19th-C Cont Pol Lit/Cul Film

36500 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 103
(also listed as C L 323, POL 324, REE 325 )
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Students will study cultural and intellectual history represented in the major works of Polish literature in the nineteenth and twentieth century.

Readings and discussions are in English.  No knowledge of Polish is required.

Students who read Polish are encouraged to do so.

Films will be used to show the media interpretation of the major works of Polish literature.

Course Description:

In this course, we will study Polish national cinema from 1945 to the year 2007.

The different stages of development of Polish cinema are usually related to changing political situation in Poland.  The focus is on full-length narrative films of seven great Polish directors:

Leonard Buczkowski, Andrzej Wajda, Roman Polanski, Krzysztof Zanussi, Krzysztof Kieslowski, Sylwester Checinski, and Wladyslaw Pasikowski.

We will start with the first postwar movie, follow with later movies of the Polish School period paying tribute to the victims of the war.  Next, we will watch “Cinema of Distrust” with series of contemporary films centers around the conflict between individual and the state during communism. The Solidarity movement and the most popular works will follow. We will conclude with movies showing Poland in a process of transition from one political system to another and return to democracy.  We will see a comedy to bring some hope that in Poland it might be finally possible to laugh at matters normally very serious. The conclusion will be a Polish crime thriller whose director draws on formula of American action films, but despite that makes “very Polish” movie.

There is no prerequisite for this course.

Texts:

The following text is required for the course:

            Polish National Cinema, Marek Haltof, Berghahn Books 2002, available at Coop

List of recommended readings for your research essays will be posted on Blackboard.

Requirements and Grading:

The final grade for the course will be cumulative and based upon the percentages indicated.

There will be no final examination.

Attendance                                                                 10%

Class preparation, participation in discussions                      20%

Presentation                                                                20%

Two Research Essays                                                     50% (25% each)

EUS 347 • Polish Lit & Culture In Film

36397 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 208
(also listed as POL 324, REE 325 )
show description

Course Description

The course presents the highlights of Polish literature and culture through the works of internationally recognized Polish directors and selected readings.

Students will study major works of Polish literature in the context of Western and East European/Slavic traditions.  The road will start in the Middle Ages, and continue through Renaissance, Baroque, Enlightenment, Romanticism, Positivism, and literature in the 20th century.

Readings include early Polish poetry, short stories, novels, plays and drama. 

All texts, movies, and discussions will be in English.  Students with good knowledge of Polish may read in the original Polish. 

 

Texts:

The History of Polish Literature by Czeslaw Milosz

                  Selected readings

                  Movies

Requirements and Grading

10% Attendance

20% Participation

10% Readings Quizzes

10% Movie Quizzes

10% Literary Works Quizzes

20% Project

20% Final Paper

Undergraduate Courses

Fall 2010 POL 312K "Second-Year Polish I"

Course Description 

Second-Year Polish continues the exploration of  the language of a vibrant nation which is  the geographical center of Europe.  The course will emphasize proficiency in contemporary Polish: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

Second Year Polish seeks to integrate knowledge of the culture and society of contemporary Poland with the acquisition of grammar and vocabulary.  Classroom activities will focus on meaningful communication, and will be supplemented with Polish film and video material.

Fall 2011 POL 506 First Year Polish I

This course is the first semester of the Polish language instruction.

This course will be of assistance in mastering grammar, the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing), and Polish culture.

Fall 2011 REE 325 "Third-Year Polish I"

Course description:           

 

This course is the fifth semester of Polish   language studies.

Students will practice and enhance their reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills.

The subjects in this course relate to every -day life and illustrate the reality of life in Poland.

This course will increase students’ ability to function in Polish and help them understand and appreciate Polish culture.

 

Prerequisites: POL 312L or consent of instructor

 

 


Fall 2011 SLA 301/REE 301 "Introduction to Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies"

Course Description:

 

Introduction to the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe through each of the major disciplines represented in the program: language, literature, anthropology, geography, history, government, sociology, and economics.  Core course required for a degree in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies. Meets with SLA 301 and GRG 309. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any Bachelor’s degree. Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 

Texts:

 

1.Slavenka Draculic, 2005, They Would Never Hurt a Fly, Penguin

 

2. Heda Kovaly, 1997, Under a Cruel Star: A Life in Prague, 1941-1968. New York: Holmes and Meier

3. Brigid Pastulka, 2009, A Long Time Ago and Essentially True, Boston, New York, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

4. Bella Bychkova Jordan and Terry G Jordan-Bychkov, 2001, Siberian Village: Land and Life in the Sakha Republic, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Additional readings might be recommended for individual lectures.

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