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Douglas Biow, Director MEZ 3.126, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-3470

Thomas Garza

Associate Professor Ed.D., Harvard University, 1987

University Distinguished Teaching Associate Professor and Director, Texas Language Center
Thomas Garza

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EUS 307 • Vampire In Slavic Cultures

36675 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CMA 2.306
(also listed as C L 305, REE 302, SLA 301 )
show description

Eight hundred years before Bram Stoker gave us the West's most memorable vampire in Dracula (1897) and long before the exploits of Vlad "the Impaler" Tepes horrified Europe (1431-46), the Russian Primary Chronicles write of a Novgorodian priest as Upyr' Likhij, or Wicked Vampire (1047).  The Slavic and Balkan worlds abound in histories, legends, myths and literary portraits of the so-called undead, creatures that literally draw life out of the living. This course examines the vampire in the cultures of Russia and Eastern Europe, including manifestations in literature, religion, art, film and common practices from its origins to 2013.  Texts – both print and non-print media – will be drawn from Russian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Hungarian, Serbian and Croatian sources.  Participants will be asked to separate historical fact from popular fiction, and form opinions about the place of the vampire in Slavic and East European cultures. 

Prerequisites:  The course is conducted in English.  No knowledge of Russian required, though readings in Russian and other Slavic languages are available for majors and concentrators in these related fields.

Readings:   • The Vampire in Slavic Culture, Course Reader (CR), T. J. Garza, ed., Cognella Press, San Diego: CA, 2010. [order online]

The Vampire: A Casebook, Alan Dundes, Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1998.

[at the UT Co-op]

Grading:         

Short essay I (3-4 pp.)          25%                            

Midterm exam I                    25%

Short essay II (3-4 pp.)         25%                            

Midterm exam II                  25%

EUS 307 • Vampire In Slavic Cultures

36270 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CAL 100
(also listed as C L 305, REE 302, SLA 301 )
show description

Description

Eight hundred years before Bram Stoker gave us the West's most memorable vampire in his novel Dracula and long before the exploits of Vlad "the Impaler" Tepes horrified Europe, the Russian Primary Chronicles tell of a Novgorodian prince as Upyr' Lichyj, or Wicked Vampire.  The Slavic and Balkan worlds abound in histories, legends, myths and literary portraits of the so-called un-dead, creatures which draw life out of the living.

This course examines the vampire in the history and cultures of Russia, the Balkans and Central and Eastern Europe, including manifestations in literature, religion, art, film and common practices.  Texts – both print and non-print media, both Slavic and non-Slavic – will be drawn from Russian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Hungarian, Romany, Serbian and Croatian sources.  Participants will be asked to separate historical fact from popular fiction (where possible!), and form opinions about the place and importance of the vampire in Slavic and other Central European cultures. 

The course is conducted in English.  No knowledge of Russian required, though readings in Russian and other Slavic languages are available for majors and concentrators in the field.

Texts

 The Darkling: A Treatise on Slavic Vampirism.  Jan L. Perkowski, Columbus, OH: Slavica Publishers, 1989. [photocopy]

 The Vampire Casebook, Alan Dundes, Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press, 1998.

 Packet of readings

Recommended Text

Blood Read: The Vampire as Metaphor in Contemporary Culture, Joan Gordon and

Veronica Hollinger, eds., Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press,  1997.

Requirements and grading

Short essay I (5 pp.)                            20%

Midterm exam                                      20%

Short essay II (5 pp.)                            20%

Text journal                                          20%

Final exam                                            20%

EUS 307 • Vampire In Slavic Cultures

36425 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CAL 100
(also listed as C L 305, REE 302, SLA 301 )
show description

Required texts:

The Vampire in Slavic Culture, Course Reader (CR), T. J. Garza, ed., University Readers, San Diego: CA, 2009.

The Vampire: A Casebook, Alan Dundes, Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1998.

Recommended texts:

 • The Darkling: A Treatise on Slavic Vampirism, Jan L. Perkowski, Columbus: Slavica Publishers, 1989.

Vampire Lore: From the Writings of Jan Louis Perkowski. Jan L. Perkowski, Bloomington: Slavica Publishers, 2006.

Blood Read: The Vampire as Metaphor in Contemporary Culture, J. Gordon and V. Hollinger, Philadelphia: UPenn Press, 1997.

Dracula, Bram Stoker, New York: Signet, 1997.

 I.         General

            Eight hundred years before Bram Stoker gave us the West's most memorable vampire in Dracula (1897) and long before the exploits of Vlad "the Impaler" Tepes horrified Europe (1431-46), the Russian Primary Chronicles write of a Novgorodian priest as Upyr' Likhij, or Wicked Vampire (1047).  The Slavic and Balkan worlds abound in histories, legends, myths and literary portraits of the so-called undead, creatures which draw life out of the living.

            This course examines the vampire in the cultures of Russia and Eastern Europe, including manifestations in literature, religion, art, film and common practices from its origins to 2009.  Texts – both print and non-print media – will be drawn from Russian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Hungarian, Serbian and Croatian sources.  Participants will be asked to separate historical fact from popular fiction, and form opinions about the place of the vampire in Slavic and East European cultures. 

The course is conducted in English.  No knowledge of Russian required, though readings in Russian and other Slavic languages are available for majors and concentrators in related fields.

II.        Course Requirements

 Attendance and Participation: You are expected to attend class meetings regularly, participate actively in discussions, do all assigned readings and film viewings, and prepare written assignments. Because the readings and critical approaches covered in this course are cumulative in design, your regular participation is required.  Students missing more than three (3) class sessions will receive a reduction of their final grade.  Students who miss more than five (5) classes, or who do not complete all four of the required components of the syllabus cannot pass the course. In extreme circumstances, the instructor may excuse absences.

Short Essays: Two brief (4-5 pages) reaction papers to one of the readings or media presentations covered in class are due by Thursday, October 1, and Thursday, November 5.  While these essays are not research based, they may contain references or support from external sources.

Midterm Exam: A comprehensive midterm exam over all material covered (readings, films, slides, and lectures) in the first half of the course will be given on Thursday, October 22.  The specific format of the midterm will be announced well before the exam date.

Final exam: An exam – comparable in format to the midterm – covering the material (readings, films, slides, lectures) from the second half of the course -- will be given during the University exam period on Wednesday, December 9 from 2:00 – 5:00 pm.

Special Accommodations: Any student with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations fro the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259. Any necessary accommodations should be presented to the instructor in written form.

 III.      Grading

In addition to regular attendance and participation, there are four components of the final course grade.  These components and their relative weights are:

Short essay I (4-5 pp.)          25%                            

Midterm exam                    25%

Short essay II (4-5 pp.)        25%                            

Final exam                         25%

All grades for this course will be assigned using the plus/minus system as follows:

A (4.00)?A- (3.67)?B+ (3.33)?B (3.00)?B- (2.67)?C+ (2.33)?C (2.00)?C- (1.67)?D+ (1.33)?D (1.00)?D- (.67)?F (0.00)

COURSE OUTLINE

Thursday, August 27           Introduction to SLA 301

                                                Overview of syllabus and course design for 301

                           • Definition of terms:  “Slavic” and “Vampire”

                           • Establishment of scene: the Carpathians and the Balkans

                                    View scene from Coppola’s Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula.’

For next meeting, read definitions of term “vampire” in the CR pp. 5-28, and “The History of the Word Vampire” in Dundes, pp. 3-11.

 

Tuesday, September 1         On Vampires and Upyri 

                           • The relationship between Slavic upyr and European vampire

For next session, read  “Poetic Views of the Slavs Regarding Nature” by

Afanasiev, “Heretics as Vampires and Demons in Russia” by Oinas , “Vampirism: Old World Folklore” by McNally & Floresçu,  “The Need Fire” by Fraser and“’Spoiling’ and ‘Healing’” by Ivanits in the CR pp. 29-66.

 

Thursday, September 3       Origins of Vampire Beliefs in the

                                                Slavic World

                           • Understanding the place of the vampire in the Slavic world

For the next session, read “The Epic of Gilgemesh: Prologue” by Kramer , “Lilith” by Guiley,  “Tlahuelpuchi” by Fraser and “Sirin” in the CR pp. 67-80.

 

Tuesday, September 8         From Folktales and Myths: Harpies and Sirin

                           • Folk belief, folklore and demons in the Slavic world

                           • Relationship between religion, paganism, and the vampire

For next meeting, read “Lycanthropy among the Ancients” by Baring-Gould, “The Werewolf: An Introduction” by Ashley, and “Lycanthropy and the Undead Corpse,” by Keyworth in CR pp. 81-118.

 

Thursday, September 11     Are Werewolves Vampires, Too?

                           • Werewolves, the undead and vampires

                           • The meaning behind the “vukodlak” in Slavic

 For next meeting, read “A Journey into Dracula Country” by Mascetti and “The Historical Dracula: Tyrant from Transylvania” by McNally and Floresçu in CR pp. 119-136.

 

Tuesday, September 15       Finding the Real “Dracula”

                           • Getting to know Transylvania

                           • The life and times of Vlad Tepes

For next meeting, read “Crusader Against the Turks” by McNally and Floresçu, and “Epilogue: The Imprisonment and Final Reign of Dracula” in CR pp. 137-158.

 

Thursday, September 17     Vlad “The Impaler” Dracula

                        • Who was the real Dracula?

                        • Why does the “myth” live on in Transylvania?

For next meeting, read “Bathory, Elizabeth,” by Melton, “Bathory, Elizabeth,” by Bunson, and “The Passion of Bathory: Bloody Christmas 1610,” by McNally in CR pp. 159-178.

 

Tuesday, September 22       Elizabeth Bathory

• How “vampirization” reports became part of the European tradition

For next meeting, read “Slavs, Vampires and the” in CR pp. 181-186.

 

Thursday, September 24     Vampires in the Slavic Lands

                           • The Balkans as backdrop for the vampire

                           • The vampire myth behind nationalism

For next meeting, read “In Defense of Vampires” in Dundes, pp. 57-66; and “Of Magic, Witches and Vampires in the Balkans,” “Bulgaria, Vampires in,” and “Southern Slavs, Vampires and the” in the CR pp. 187-204.

 

Tuesday, September 29       South Slavic Vampires

                           • The vampire as part of Balkan identity

For the next meeting, read “Gypsies , Vampires and the” in CR pp. 205-210.  First Reaction Paper is due on Thursday!

 

Thursday, October 1            Gypsies (Roma) and Vampires

                           • A culture within a culture

                        • Dispelling and creating racial prejudices

                        • Short Essay I due today

For the next meeting, read Oinas’ “East European Vampires” in Dundes, pp. 47-56; and “Russia, Vampires in,” by Melton, and “Tale of a Russian Vampire” by Blavatsky in CR pp. 211-220.

 

Tuesday, October 6              Russian Vampires

                           • Differences in East Slavic from the South Slavic Balkans

For next meeting, read Summers’ “Russia, Roumania and Bulgaria,” and Melton’s “Romania, Vampires in” in CR pp. 221-262.

 

Thursday, October 8            Central European Vampires, I

                        • The vampire in its historical home

                        • Issues of language and culture difference

For next meeting, read Murgoci’s and Perkowski’s “The Roumanian Folkloric Vampire” in Dundes pp. 12-34; and “Hungary, Vampires in,” “Czech Republic and Slovakia, Vampires in the” by Melton, and “The Golem” by DeBartolo in CR pp. 263-276.

 

Tuesday, October 13            Central European Vampires, II

                       • Beginnings of a literary tradition in vampire tales

                       • View and discuss The Golem

For next meeting, read “Peter Plogojowitz,” “The Shoemaker of Silesia,” and “Visum et Repertum” by Barber, and “Russian Stories” in CR pp. 277-306.

 

Thursday, October 15          Early Vampire Stories

                           • Connections between Vlad Tepes and European literature

                           • How the vampire legend reached Stoker in literature       

For next meeting, read Polidori’s/Byron’s “The Vampyre,” Chapter 2 from Stoker’s Dracula, and “From Dracula to Nosferatu” in CR pp. 309-330.

 

Tuesday, October 20            The Literary Vampire: From Byron to

Bram Stoker’s Dracula 

               • Connections between Vlad Tepes and European literature

               • How the vampire legend reached Stoker in literature       

 For next meeting, prepare for Midterm Exam (No new reading.).

 

Thursday, October 22          Midterm Exam

                           • In-class written exam over material (texts, films, slides, lectures)

For next meeting, read  Gibson’s “Dracula and the Eastern Question” in CR pp. 337-348, and watch and watch F.W. Murnau’s Nosferatu.

 

Thursday, October 27          The Literary Vampire: Film and the Slavic Tradition

                           • The vampire as the “Other” in film

                           • View scenes from Nosferatu (1922)

For next meeting, and Neruda’s “The Vampire” in CR pp. 349-352; and watch Todd Browning’s film Dracula (1931) with Bela Lugosi.

 

Thursday, October 29          The Vampire in Czech Literature

                           • Comparison of cultural tradition and literary works

                           • View scenes from Dracula (1931)

For next meeting, read Karamzin’s “The Island of Bornholm,” Pushkin’s “The Bridegroom” (two versions), “Evil Spirits,” and “The Drowned Man,” in CR pp. 353-382.

 

Tuesday, November 3        The Vampire in Russian Literature, I

               • Creating a literary standard for Russian for horror

For next meeting, read Tolstoy’s “The Family of the Vurdalak” in CR pp. 383-400. 

Second Reaction Paper is due on Thursday! 

 

Thursday, November 5      The Vampire in Russian Literature, II

               • A return to folk motifs in literary Russian

                           • View selection from Mario Bava’s Black Sunday

                           • Short Essay II due today.

 For next meeting, read Gogol’s “Viy,” and Turgenev’s “Phantoms: A Fantasy,” in CR pp. 401-456.

 

Thursday, November 5      The Vampire in Russian Literature, II

               • A return to folk motifs in literary Russian

                           • View selection from Mario Bava’s Black Sunday

                           • Short Essay II due today.

For next meeting, read Gogol’s “Viy,” and Turgenev’s “Phantoms: A Fantasy,” in CR pp. 401-456.

 

Thursday, November 12    The Vampire in Russian Literature, IV

                           • Fantasy moves from the 19th to the 20th century

                           • View selection from Bortko’s Master and Margarita 

For next meeting, read Pelevin’s “A Werewolf Problem in Central Russia,” and selection from Night Watch by Lukyanenko in CR pp. 471-508.

 

Tuesday, November 17      Russian Vampires for the New Century

                           • The Postmodern Slavic vampire in literature and film

                           • View scenes from Night Watch (2004)

For next meeting, read Barber’s “Forensic Pathology and the European Vampire” in Dundes, and “Protection from Blood Drinkers,” by Konstantinos and “The Rational Slayer” by McClelland in CR pp. 511-536.

 

Thursday, November 19    How to Kill a (Slavic) Vampire

                           • Death of the undead?

                           • More folk mythology in eliminating the vampire

For next meeting, read song lyrics for Vysotsky, Lika, Linda, and Detsl in CR pp. 539-550.

 

Happy Thanksgiving!

Tuesday, December 1          Vampires and Russian Pop Music

                           • View Russian music videos of the ‘90s and ‘00s

                           • Incorporating vampires into pop culture

For last meeting, read lyrics for The Leg Cramps, B-2, Uma2rman,

Night Snipers, and Grigoriy Leps in CR pp. 551-561.

 

Thursday, December 3        Russian Rock, Goths and Vamps

                           • View Russian music videos of the 2000s

                           •Examine web-based Russian gothic movement

                           • Final exam format

Prepare for Final Examination

 

 

 

 

Undergraduate Courses

Fall 2010 RUS 601C Intensive First Year Russian

Course Description

This course provides a very intensive introduction to Russian language and culture. The in-class quotient of the course will be heavily based on active listening and speaking practice, with much use of various print, video, and web-based media. This course will require students to commit to undertaking intensive methods of instruction, which require their active participation in class and considerable attention to the language outside of class.  The goal of the course is to bring students to a level of functional proficiency in speaking and reading in a short-term course that will prepare them for intermediate Russian, or to engage in study abroad.  Students successfully completing this course may continue to RUS 611c in the spring to fulfill the Foreign Language Requirement in one year.

Fall 2010 RUS 360/CL 323/REE 385 Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita: A Source Study

Course Description

Stalin’s Moscow, 1936, The Devil and his gang have come to the mortal world to determine how Mankind is faring in the 20th century.  He encounters a motley crew of Soviet bureaucrats, writers, politicians and arts who offer little hope for the future.  Enter the “Master”, an unknown writer struggling to finish a novel about the life of Christ told from the perspective of Pontius Pilate.  Can one writer and his work be reason enough to prevent the apocalypse? Enter Margarita, the Master’s selfless companion and heroine of Mikhail Bulgakov’s masterpiece, The Master and Margarita.  Regarded by many readers and critics as one of the greatest novels of our time, The Master and Margarita is a fixed part of Russian culture.  This course will explore not only the intricacies of the novel itself, but also its place among Bulgakov’s other literary works, and its varied sources from world literature, music and the visual arts.  More importantly, it reveals the brilliance and complexities of art created under a strict totalitarian regime.  This course will examine—within the Stalin-era Soviet context—the texts and philosophies that significantly influenced Bulgakov in the creation of his novel.  You will examine these various texts (philosophical treatises, stories, folklore, plays, paintings, opera, and films) and discover the ways that they influenced the shape of the novel and how they appear within the dual story lines and the numerous characters.  Ultimately, the course will allow you to reexamine your own philosophy of good and Evil in the 21st century.

Fall 2011 RUS 601C Intensive First Year Russian

Добро пожаловать! Welcome to the Russian 601c – an intensive and unique adventure in language acquisition! This course is designed to bring you quickly to functional proficiency in the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world. More that 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional 150 million throughout the world, speak Russian. It is the language of some of the world’s greatest literature: Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Gorky, and Solzhenitsyn, among others. It is the culture of some of the greatest scientists and innovators in the West: Lomonosov, Mendeleev, Pavlov, and Gagarin. And it is the country of some of most influential politicians of the Twentieth Century: Lenin, Stalin, Gorbachev, and Putin. As the most recent addition to the G8 summit meetings, Russia is fast becoming a major player of the global economy. The major cities of Moscow and St. Petersburg attract thousands of tourists, businesspeople, and students each year, including a sizeable number of summer students from UT on our program “Moscow Plus.”  We hope you’ll be among them next summer 2012!

Course Content: This course is the first semester of intensive Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading. Writing will be developed primarily through workbook and computer-based home assignments.  We will cover all of
Volumes One and Two of the textbooks, Units One through Unit Fourteen, spending about one week on each unit. In addition, this course aims to develop computer literacy skills – in Russian – for you to be truly functional and competitive in the language. 

Fall 2011 SLA 301/REE 302/C L 305/EUS 307 “The Vampire in Slavic Cultures”

Eight hundred years before Bram Stoker gave us the West's most memorable vampire in Dracula (1897) and long before the exploits of Vlad "the Impaler" Tepes horrified Europe (1431-46), the Russian Primary Chronicles write of a Novgorodian priest as Upyr' Likhij, or Wicked Vampire (1047).  The Slavic and Balkan worlds abound in histories, legends, myths and literary portraits of the so-called undead, creatures that literally draw life out of the living.

   This course examines the vampire in the cultures of Russia and Eastern Europe, including manifestations in literature, religion, art, film and common practices from its origins to 2011.  Texts – both print and non-print media – will be drawn from Russian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Hungarian, Serbian and Croatian sources.  Participants will be asked to separate historical fact from popular fiction, and form opinions about the place of the vampire in Slavic and East European cultures. 

The course is conducted in English.  No knowledge of Russian required, though readings in Russian and other Slavic languages are available for majors and concentrators in these related fields.

Graduate Courses

Fall 2010 REE 385/RUS 360/CL 323 Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita: A Source Study

Course Description

Stalin’s Moscow, 1936, The Devil and his gang have come to the mortal world to determine how Mankind is faring in the 20th century.  He encounters a motley crew of Soviet bureaucrats, writers, politicians and arts who offer little hope for the future.  Enter the “Master”, an unknown writer struggling to finish a novel about the life of Christ told from the perspective of Pontius Pilate.  Can one writer and his work be reason enough to prevent the apocalypse? Enter Margarita, the Master’s selfless companion and heroine of Mikhail Bulgakov’s masterpiece, The Master and Margarita.  Regarded by many readers and critics as one of the greatest novels of our time, The Master and Margarita is a fixed part of Russian culture.  This course will explore not only the intricacies of the novel itself, but also its place among Bulgakov’s other literary works, and its varied sources from world literature, music and the visual arts.  More importantly, it reveals the brilliance and complexities of art created under a strict totalitarian regime.  This course will examine—within the Stalin-era Soviet context—the texts and philosophies that significantly influenced Bulgakov in the creation of his novel.  You will examine these various texts (philosophical treatises, stories, folklore, plays, paintings, opera, and films) and discover the ways that they influenced the shape of the novel and how they appear within the dual story lines and the numerous characters.  Ultimately, the course will allow you to reexamine your own philosophy of good and Evil in the 21st century.

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