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Douglas Biow, Director MEZ 3.126, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-3470

Barbara Harlow

Professor Ph.D., 1977, SUNY- Buffalo

Barbara Harlow

Contact

Biography

College: Liberal Arts

Home Department: English

Additional department affiliations: Middle Eastern Studies

Education: Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo

Research interests:
Third world studies; critical theory; prison and resistance writings and postcolonial studies (particularly Anglophone African and modern Arabic literatures and cultures)

EUS 347 • The European Novel

36670 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 105
(also listed as E 356 )
show description

Instructor:  Harlow, B

Unique #:  35855

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  EUS 347

Flags:  Global Cultures; Writing

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: “European novel”: is the formula a redundancy, or the description of but one historical, continental subset of a modern genre of world literature? This course will examine both the “roots” of the novel in European literary history and the changing parameters of “Europe” over the last several centuries. Colonialism, social upheaval and political revolution, the formation of modern states in the 19th century, world wars, and the controversial consolidation of the European Union in the last decades of the 20th century will provide the background and premises for our readings of a selection of European novels, both classical and contemporary.

Texts: Victor Hugo, Notre Dame of Paris; Jules Verne, Around the World in Eighty Days; Joseph Conrad, The Secret Agent; Thomas Mann, Death in Venice; Albert Camus, The Plague; Slavenka Drakulic, Café Europa; Additional critical readings.

Requirements & Grading: The class will be conducted as much as possible as a seminar and participation and attendance are required (that is, attendance will be taken and absences penalized). In addition to readings (and occasional quizzes), writing assignments will include two short papers, one reaction paper, one paper proposal, and a final paper. All writing assignments are due on the date indicated on the syllabus and late submissions will be penalized.

2 research assignments (750 wds) = 30%; 1 reaction paper (750 wds) = 15%; 1 paper proposal = 15%; 1 final paper = 30%.

EUS 347 • The European Novel

36820 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAR 105
(also listed as E 356 )
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Instructor:  Harlow, B            Areas:  III / F

Unique #:  35860            Flags:  Global cultures / non-Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  EUS 347            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: “European novel”: is the formula a redundancy, or the description of but one historical, continental subset of a modern genre of world literature? This course will examine both the “roots” of the novel in European literary history and the changing parameters of “Europe” over the last several centuries. Colonialism, social upheaval and political revolution, the formation of modern states in the 19th century, world wars, and the controversial consolidation of the European Union in the last decades of the 20th century will provide the background and premises for our readings of a selection of European novels, both classical and contemporary.

Texts: Victor Hugo, Notre Dame of Paris; Jules Verne, Around the World in Eighty Days; Joseph Conrad, The Secret Agent; Thomas Mann, Death in Venice; Albert Camus, The Plague; Slavenka Drakulic, Café Europa; Additional critical readings.

Requirements & Grading: The class will be conducted as much as possible as a seminar and participation and attendance are required (that is, attendance will be taken and absences penalized). In addition to readings (and occasional quizzes), writing assignments will include two short papers and one written panel presentation. All writing assignments are due on the date indicated on the syllabus and late submissions will be penalized.

Regular quizzes and short assignments: 40%; Paper proposal: 15%; End-of-term paper: 25%; Attendance and participation: 20%.

EUS 347 • The European Novel

36410 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 204
(also listed as E 356 )
show description

Instructor:  Harlow, B            Areas:  III

Unique #:  35365            Flags:  Global cultures, Writing

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  EUS 347            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing. 

Description: “European novel”: is the formula a redundancy, or the description of but one historical, continental subset of a modern genre of world literature? This course will examine both the “roots” of the novel in European literary history and the changing parameters of “Europe” over the last several centuries. Colonialism, social upheaval and political revolution, the formation of modern states in the 19th century, world wars, and the controversial consolidation of the European Union in the last decades of the 20th century will provide the background and premises for our readings of a selection of European novels, both classical and contemporary.

Texts: Victor Hugo, Notre Dame of Paris; Jules Verne, Around the World in Eighty Days; Joseph Conrad, The Secret Agent; Thomas Mann, Death in Venice; Albert Camus, The Plague; Slavenka Drakulic, Café Europa; Additional critical readings. 

Requirements & Grading: The class will be conducted as much as possible as a seminar and participation and attendance are required (that is, attendance will be taken and absences penalized). In addition to readings (and occasional quizzes), writing assignments will include two short papers and one written panel presentation. All writing assignments are due on the date indicated on the syllabus and late submissions will be penalized.

Two short papers: 30%; Paper proposal: 15%; End-of-term paper: 25%; Response paper: 10%; Attendance and participation: 20%.

EUS 347 • The European Novel

36625 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 204
(also listed as E 356 )
show description

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Course Description: “European novel”: is the formula a redundancy, or the description of but one historical, continental subset of a modern genre of world literature? This course will examine both the “roots” of the novel in European literary history and the changing parameters of “Europe” over the last several centuries. Colonialism, social upheaval and political revolution, the formation of modern states in the 19th century, world wars, and the controversial consolidation of the European Union in the last decades of the 20th century will provide the background and premises for our readings of a selection of European novels, both classical and contemporary.

Texts: Victor Hugo, Notre Dame of Paris; Jules Verne, Around the World in Eighty Days; Joseph Conrad, The Secret Agent; Thomas Mann, Death in Venice; Albert Camus. The Plague; Hannah Arendt. Rahel Varnhagen; Additional critical readings

Grading: The class will be conducted as much as possible as a seminar and participation and attendance are required (that is, attendance will be taken and absences penalized). In addition to readings (and occasional quizzes), writing assignments will include two short papers and one written panel presentation. All writing assignments are due on the date indicated on the syllabus and late submissions will be penalized.

Two short papers: 30%; Paper proposal: 15%; End-of-Term Paper: 25%; Panel presentation:10%; Attendance and participation: 20%

EUS 347 • The European Novel-W

36245 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 930-1100 PAR 204
(also listed as C L 323, E 356 )
show description

E356/EUS347/CL323 The European Novel

Barbara Harlow, Spring 2010
Parlin 26  /  471-8716  /  bharlow@mail.utexas.edu
office hours: T/Th 11-12.30 (and by appointment)

“European novel”: is the formula a redundancy, or the description of but one historical, continental subset of a modern genre of world literature? This course will examine both the “roots” of the novel in European literary history and the changing parameters of “Europe” over the last several centuries. Colonialism, social upheaval and political revolution, the formation of modern states in the 19th century, world wars, and the controversial consolidation of the European Union in the last decades of the 20th century will provide the background and the premises for our readings of a selection of classic European novels and their contemporary currency.

readings:

  • Victor Hugo. Notre-Dame of Paris
  • Jules Verne. Around the World in 80 Days
  • Joseph Conrad. The Secret Agent
  • Thomas Mann. Death in Venice
  • Albert Camus. The Plague
  • Hannah Arendt. Rahel Varnhagen
  • + critical articles

requirements

The class will be conducted as much as possible as a seminar and participation (you need to do the assigned reading beforehand) and attendance are required (that is, attendance will be taken and absences penalized). In addition to the readings (and occasional quizzes – as/if required), writing assignments will include two research assignments, one written panel presentation, a final paper prospectus, and the final paper itself. All writing assignments are due on the date indicated on the syllabus and late submissions will be penalized.

writing assignments

  • 2 research assignments (750 wds each = 1500 wds) = 30%
  • 1 panel presentation (750 wds) = 15%
  • 1 paper proposal (750 wds) = 15%
  • final paper (1800-2400 wds) = 30%
  • = 90% of the final grade (grading on a plus/minus basis)

For the research/writing papers, specific assignment sheets will be distributed two weeks before the paper is due. For the final paper proposal, the assignment sheet will be distributed before spring break. The papers are due in class on the date indicated on the syllabus.

NB: For all writing assignments, students should be aware – and observant – of UT’s policy on plagiarism. There are negative and positive reasons for this admonition: negative – you get in trouble if you don’t observe the policy; positive – by citing your sources, you join a community of scholars who share their work.

Other Notices:

Undergraduate Writing Center, FAC 211, 471-6222: http://uwc.utexas.edu/home). The Undergraduate Writing Center offers free, individualized, expert help with writing for any UT undergraduate, by appointment or on a drop-in basis. Any undergraduate enrolled in a course at UT can visit the UWC for assistance with any writing project. They work with students from every department on campus, for both academic and non-academic writing. Whether you are writing a lab report, a resume, a term paper, a statement for an application, or your own poetry, UWC consultants will be happy to work with you. Their services are not just for writing with "problems." Getting feedback from an informed audience is a normal part of a successful writing project. Consultants help students develop strategies to improve their writing. The assistance they provide is intended to foster independence. Each student determines how to use the consultant's advice. The consultants are trained to help you work on your writing in ways that preserve the integrity of your work.

University policy is to respect religious holidays – and we will respect them as well. If, however, you will be absent for reason of religious observance and would like to share information about your respective traditions, these contributions will be welcome.

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

Finally, no cell-phones or computers are allowed in class – turn them off and put them away.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

UGS 302 • Humanitarian Aid Workers-W

64620 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm MAI 220C
show description

UGS302 (64620) R2P: STORIES FROM HUMANITARIAN AID WORKERS

Barbara Harlow  /  Fall 2009  /  T/Th 11-12.30
Office Hours: M 1-3 (Rapoport Center, Law School), T 12.30-2/Th 12.30-1.30 (Parlin 26) and by appointment
bharlow@mail.utexas.edu

Description:

“Responsibility to protect” (or R2P) is yet another formulation for “humanitarian interventionism.” What difference does it make? Our readings of the personal accounts of aid workers and advocates will attempt to address some of the challenges, crises, contradictions, recriminations – and rewards – entailed by the “responsibility to protect.”

Selected readings include:

  • Another Day in Paradise: Front Line Stories from International Aid Workers
  • Mahvish Rukhsana Khan. My Guantanamo Diary: The Detainees and the Stories They Told Me (translator)
  • Jonny Steinberg. Sizwe’s Test: A Young Man’s Journey Through Africa’s AIDS Epidemic (journalist)
  • Kenneth Cain, Heidi Postlewait, Andrew Thomson. Emergency Sex and Other Desperate Measures (UN aid workers)
  • David Kennedy. The Dark Sides of Virtue: Reassessing International Humanitarianism (law professor)
  • Clea Koff. The Bone Woman (forensic anthropologist)

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

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