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Douglas Biow, Director MEZ 3.126, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-3470

James M. Vaughn

Assistant Professor Ph.D., 2008, University of Chicago

James M. Vaughn

Contact

Biography

Research interests

My main interests lie in the history of Britain and the history of the British Empire in the late seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. My current project examines the origins and early development of the British East India Company's territorial empire in the context of metropolitan socio-political evolution and far-reaching global transformations in the eighteenth century.

Courses taught

Modern Britain I, 1660-1815; Modern Britain II, 1789-1945; Liberalism and the British Empire; Britain, Capitalism, Modernity; The British Empire and the Making of the Modern World.

EUS 346 • Hist Of Britain Restoratn-1783

35644 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WEL 2.308
(also listed as HIS 334J )
show description

This lecture course surveys the political, social, economic, and intellectual history of Great Britain from the end of the War of American Independence in 1783 to the outbreak of the First World War in 1914.  The central theme of the course is the radical transformation (or “modernization”) of British politics and society via the interconnected processes of democratization and industrialization.  The lectures and readings focus on such topics as British politics during the American and French revolutions, the transition from the First to the Second British Empire, industrial capitalism and the formation of a class society, the emergence and development of classical liberalism and proletarian socialism, the struggle for parliamentary reform and mass democracy, the creation of a unified world economy, and the Great Power rivalry and empire-building of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Texts:

Eric J. Evans, The Shaping of Modern Britain: Identity, Industry and Empire, 1780-1914 (Longman, 2011).

Antoinette Burton, ed., Politics and Empire in Victorian Britain: A Reader (Palgrave Macmillan, 2001).

Grading:

1. Class attendance and participation – 15% of final grade.

2. Short reading response paper – 15% of final grade.

3. Mid-term exam – 30% of final grade.

4. Final exam – 40% of final grade.

EUS 346 • Enlightenment & Revolution

35680 • Spring 2015
Meets M 600pm-900pm GAR 1.134
(also listed as CTI 375, HIS 350L )
show description

This seminar course examines the relationship between the intellectual project of the Enlightenment and the political and social transformations that unfolded in western Europe and North America from the beginnings of the Dutch Revolt in the 1560s to the decade following the Paris Commune of 1871.  What was the connection between intellectual enlightenment and social-political revolution in the West?  The central theme of the course is the contemporary intellectual comprehension of far-reaching social, political, and economic change.  The seminar sessions involve close readings and extensive discussions of the writings of major European intellectuals who sought to understand, analyze, and criticize the upheavals and transformations taking place around them.  Authors read and discussed include Hugo Grotius, René Descartes, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Bernard Mandeville, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Adam Smith, Immanuel Kant, Benjamin Constant, G. W. F. Hegel, John Stuart Mill, and Karl Marx.

 

Texts:

René Descartes, Discourse on Method and Meditations on First Philosophy (Hackett, 2011).

John Locke, Political Writings (Hackett, 2003).

Bernard Mandeville, The Fable of the Bees and Other Writings (Hackett, 1997).

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, The Basic Political Writings (Hackett, 1987).

Adam Smith, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (Univ. Chicago Press, 1977).

Immanuel Kant, Perpetual Peace and Other Essays (Hackett, 1983).

Benjamin Constant, Political Writings (Cambridge Univ. Press, 1988).

G. W. F. Hegel, Introduction to the Philosophy of History (Hackett, 1988).

Robert C. Tucker, ed., The Marx-Engels Reader (W. W. Norton, 1978).

 

Grading:

1. Class attendance and participation – 30% of final grade.

2. Weekly reading responses – 20% of final grade.

3. Mid-term analytical essay – 20% of final grade.

4. Final analytical essay – 30% of final grade.

EUS 346 • Liberalism & British Empire

36930 • Spring 2014
Meets M 500pm-800pm GAR 0.132
(also listed as HIS 350L )
show description

The origins and development of classical liberalism in theory and practice is significantly bound up with the history of Britain and its engagements and encounters with the wider world.  This upper-level undergraduate seminar explores the emergence of the political and economic ideas of liberalism in Britain and the evolution of British overseas expansion during the seventeenth, eighteenth, and early nineteenth centuries.

 

The course examines the connections between the rise and growth of the British Empire and the development of Britain’s state, society, and economy from the final years of the Tudor dynasty to the beginning of the Victorian era.  One of the seminar’s central concerns is the historical relationship between the radical and often revolutionary ideals of emerging liberalism and the changing nature and purposes of British overseas expansion.  The course explores the ideas and texts of major figures such as John Locke, Adam Smith, and Thomas Paine as well as the works of less well-known thinkers.

 

Assignments and Grading

The seminar involves extensive writing assignments, including both short review essays and a research-based term paper.  The final grade is based on classroom attendance and participation (20%), online discussions and postings (10%), short review essays (30%), and the term paper (40%).

 

Readings

This seminar will read and discuss a number of significant primary and secondary sources. 

 

The primary sources include:

John Locke, Second Treatise of Government

Adam Smith, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations

Thomas Paine, The Rights of Man

 

The secondary sources include:

Ranajit Guha, A Rule of Property for Bengal: An Essay on the Idea of Permanent Settlement

P. J. Marshall, The Making and Unmaking of Empires: Britain, India, and America,

c. 1750-1783

Steve Pincus, 1688: The First Modern Revolution

Gordon Wood, The Americanization of Benjamin Franklin 

EUS 346 • Enlightenment And Revolution

36685 • Fall 2013
Meets TH 600pm-900pm GAR 1.134
(also listed as CTI 375, HIS 350L )
show description

This seminar course examines the relationship between the intellectual project of the Enlightenment and the political and social transformations that unfolded in western Europe and North America from the beginnings of the Dutch Revolt in the 1560s to the decade following the Paris Commune of 1871.  What was the connection between intellectual enlightenment and social-political revolution in the West?  The central theme of the course is the contemporary intellectual comprehension of far-reaching social, political, and economic change.  The seminar sessions involve close readings and extensive discussions of the writings of major European intellectuals who sought to understand, analyze, and criticize the upheavals and transformations taking place around them.  Authors read and discussed include Hugo Grotius, René Descartes, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Bernard Mandeville, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Adam Smith, Immanuel Kant, Benjamin Constant, G. W. F. Hegel, John Stuart Mill, and Karl Marx.

 

Texts:

René Descartes, Discourse on Method and Meditations on First Philosophy (Hackett, 2011).

John Locke, Political Writings (Hackett, 2003).

Bernard Mandeville, The Fable of the Bees and Other Writings (Hackett, 1997).

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, The Basic Political Writings (Hackett, 1987).

Adam Smith, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (Univ. Chicago Press, 1977).

Immanuel Kant, Perpetual Peace and Other Essays (Hackett, 1983).

Benjamin Constant, Political Writings (Cambridge Univ. Press, 1988).

G. W. F. Hegel, Introduction to the Philosophy of History (Hackett, 1988).

Robert C. Tucker, ed., The Marx-Engels Reader (W. W. Norton, 1978).

 

Grading:

1. Class attendance and participation – 30% of final grade.

2. Weekly reading responses – 20% of final grade.

3. Mid-term analytical essay – 20% of final grade.

4. Final analytical essay – 30% of final grade.

EUS 346 • Hist Of Britain Restoratn-1783

36710 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 800am-930am WEL 2.312
(also listed as HIS 334J )
show description

This lecture course surveys the political, social, economic, and intellectual history of England (and, after the Union with Scotland in 1707, of Great Britain) from the end of the Interregnum to the conclusion of the War for American Independence.  It focuses on the transformation of England/Britain from an agrarian realm characterized by an absolute monarchy, an intolerant church, and a stagnant economy into a commercial and manufacturing society characterized by a vibrant public sphere, parliamentary rule, a dynamic economy, and unparalleled degrees of civil and religious liberty.  Over the course of this period, England/Britain emerged as a world power overseeing a vast commercial and territorial empire stretching across four continents.  As such, the lectures place English/British history firmly within its European and global contexts.

 

The major topics covered include the rise of capitalism; Stuart royal absolutism; the Glorious Revolution of 1688/89 and the consolidation of parliamentary government; the Financial Revolution and the fiscal-military state; the British Enlightenment, the public sphere, and civil society; commercialization, urbanization, and consumer society; overseas expansion and imperial transformation; party politics, patriotism, and extra-parliamentary radicalism; the rise of political economy; the American Revolution and the formation of a territorial empire in South Asia; movements for parliamentary reform; and the onset of the Industrial Revolution.

 

Texts:

Paul Kléber Monod, Imperial Island: A History of Britain and Its Empire, 1660-1837 (Wiley-Blackwell, 2009).

Steven C. A. Pincus, England’s Glorious Revolution, 1688-1689: A Brief History with Documents (Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2006).

Margaret C. Jacob, The Enlightenment: A Brief History with Documents (Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2001).

 

Grading:

Attendance and Participation (10%)

Two Papers (or Short Take-Home Exams) (50%)

Take-Home Final Exam (40%)

EUS 346 • Enlightenment And Revolution

36420 • Spring 2013
Meets TH 600pm-900pm GAR 1.126
(also listed as HIS 350L )
show description

This seminar course examines the relationship between the intellectual project of the Enlightenment and the political and social transformations that unfolded in western Europe and North America from the beginnings of the Dutch Revolt in the 1560s to the decade following the Paris Commune of 1871.  What was the connection between intellectual enlightenment and social-political revolution in the West?  The central theme of the course is the contemporary intellectual comprehension of far-reaching social, political, and economic change.  The seminar sessions involve close readings and extensive discussions of the writings of major European intellectuals who sought to understand, analyze, and criticize the upheavals and transformations taking place around them.  Authors read and discussed include Hugo Grotius, René Descartes, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Bernard Mandeville, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Adam Smith, Immanuel Kant, Benjamin Constant, G. W. F. Hegel, John Stuart Mill, and Karl Marx.

 

Requirements

 

1. Class attendance and participation – 30% of final grade.

2. Weekly reading responses – 20% of final grade.

3. Mid-term analytical essay – 20% of final grade.

4. Final analytical essay – 30% of final grade.

 

Possible Texts

 

René Descartes, Discourse on Method and Meditations on First Philosophy (Hackett, 2011).

John Locke, Political Writings (Hackett, 2003).

Bernard Mandeville, The Fable of the Bees and Other Writings (Hackett, 1997).

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, The Basic Political Writings (Hackett, 1987).

Adam Smith, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (Univ. Chicago Press, 1977).

Immanuel Kant, Perpetual Peace and Other Essays (Hackett, 1983).

Benjamin Constant, Political Writings (Cambridge Univ. Press, 1988).

G. W. F. Hegel, Introduction to the Philosophy of History (Hackett, 1988).

Robert C. Tucker, ed., The Marx-Engels Reader (W. W. Norton, 1978).

 

EUS 346 • Hist Of Britain 1783 Thru Wwi

36472 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm UTC 3.134
(also listed as HIS 358M )
show description

These courses cover the topics of European Anthropology, Geography, History, and Sociology

EUS 346 • Hist Of Britain Restoratn-1783

36405 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WAG 201
(also listed as HIS 334J )
show description

These courses cover the topics of European Anthropology, Geography, History, and Sociology

EUS 346 • England In The 19th Century

36145 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm UTC 3.124
show description

These courses cover the topics of European Anthropology, Geography, History, and Sociology

EUS 346 • History Of England, 1688-1832

36460 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm UTC 3.110
(also listed as HIS 334J )
show description

Instructor: James M. Vaughn; jmvaughn@mail.utexas.edu; Office: Garrison 0.122
Office Phone: (512) 232-8268; Office Hours: Thursday, 12:30-2:30 PM and by appointment

Teaching Assistant: Robert Whitaker; whitakerbob@gmail.com; Office: Burdine 304;
Office Phone: 512-567-3549; Office Hours: Wednesday, 1:00-3:00 PM and by appointment

Depts. & Course Numbers: HIS 334J (History) & EUS 346 (European Studies)
Unique Numbers: 39915 (History) & 36460 (European Studies)

Course Description

This lecture course surveys the political, social, economic, and intellectual history of England (and, after the Union with Scotland in 1707, of Great Britain) from the end of the Interregnum to the conclusion of the War for American Independence.  It focuses on the transformation of England/Britain from an agrarian realm characterized by an absolute monarchy, an intolerant church, and a stagnant economy into a commercial and manufacturing society characterized by a vibrant public sphere, parliamentary rule, a dynamic economy, and unparalleled degrees of civil and religious liberty.  Over the course of this period, England/Britain emerged as a world power overseeing a vast commercial and territorial empire stretching across four continents.  As such, the lectures place English/British history firmly within its European and global contexts.

The major topics covered include the rise of capitalism; Stuart royal absolutism; the Glorious Revolution of 1688/89 and the consolidation of parliamentary government; the Financial Revolution and the fiscal-military state; the British Enlightenment, the public sphere, and civil society; commercialization, urbanization, and consumer society; overseas expansion and imperial transformation; party politics, patriotism, and extra-parliamentary radicalism; the rise of political economy; the American Revolution and the formation of a territorial empire in South Asia; movements for parliamentary reform; and the onset of the Industrial Revolution.

Assignments and Assessment

Attendance and Participation (10%): This is a lecture course but there will be opportunities for class discussion when time allows.  Students are expected to do all of the assigned readings and to attend the lectures.  A sign-up sheet will be passed around at the beginning of every class.  Students are responsible for signing this sheet by the end of each class session.  Each student is allowed three unexcused absences.  The attendance grade will be decreased by one third of a letter for each additional unexcused absence (e.g., A- to B+, B+ to B, etc.).  In order to have an absence excused, students must provide documentation (e.g., a doctor’s note) to the Teaching Assistant.

Two Papers (or Short Take-Home Exams) (50%): Students are required to write two papers of three to five pages in length on a major theme examined in the course’s lectures and readings.  Students will choose to answer one out of three questions for each assignment.  These papers must be edited for grammar and style, double-spaced, and in 12 pt. Times New Roman font.  If possible, papers should be reviewed at the Undergraduate Writing Center prior to submission.  The first paper will be assigned on Thursday, October 1 and is due one week later on Thursday, October 8.  The second paper will be assigned on Thursday, November 5 and is due one week later on Thursday, November 12.

Take-Home Final Exam (40%): A take-home final exam focusing on major themes and topics examined in the course will be handed out on Thursday, December 3 (the last day of class) and must be slipped under the instructor’s office door (Garrison 0.122) by 12:00 PM (noon) on Tuesday, December 15.  Students will choose to answer two out of six questions.  In response to each question, students will write an essay of three to five pages in length (total exam: six to ten pages).  The first essay will focus on the final third of the course’s lectures and readings and the second essay will focus on the course’s lectures and readings as a whole.  Both essays must be edited for grammar and style, double-spaced, and in 12 pt. Times New Roman font.  If possible, essays should be reviewed at the Undergraduate Writing Center prior to submission.

Please note that plus/minus grades (e.g., A-, B+, C-, etc.) will be assigned for the final grade in this course.

The Undergraduate Writing Center

Please consider visiting the Undergraduate Writing Center (FAC 211; 512-471-6222; http://uwc.utexas.edu/home) in order to discuss your written assignments with a member of its staff.  The following paragraph contains a description of the services provided by the UWC.

The Undergraduate Writing Center offers free, individualized, expert help with writing for any UT undergraduate, by appointment or on a drop-in basis.  Any undergraduate enrolled in a course at UT can visit the UWC for assistance with any writing project.  They work with students from every department on campus, for both academic and non-academic writing.  Whether you are writing a lab report, a resume, a term paper, a statement for an application, or your own poetry, UWC consultants will be happy to work with you.  Their services are not just for writing with "problems."  Getting feedback from an informed audience is a normal part of a successful writing project.  Consultants help students develop strategies to improve their writing.  The assistance they provide is intended to foster independence.  Each student determines how to use the consultant's advice.  The consultants are trained to help you work on your writing in ways that preserve the integrity of your work.

Academic Conduct

Students are required to uphold the standards of academic integrity set by the University of Texas at Austin.  The standards and regulations for academic integrity are available online at:

http://www.utexas.edu/cola/depts/history/about/academic-integrity.php

All work must be your own and all cases of plagiarism will automatically result in a failing grade for the course as a whole.  There will be no deadline extensions or incomplete grades unless the instructor is presented with a legitimate excuse (medical, etc.) in advance of the due date.

Students with Disabilities

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities (512-471-6259).  If you require additional assistance, please inform the instructor so that proper arrangements can be made.

Required Texts (available for purchase at the University Co-op)

1. Paul Kléber Monod, Imperial Island: A History of Britain and Its Empire, 1660-1837 (Wiley-Blackwell, 2009).

2. Steven C. A. Pincus, England’s Glorious Revolution, 1688-1689: A Brief History with Documents (Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2006).

3. Margaret C. Jacob, The Enlightenment: A Brief History with Documents (Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2001).

Schedule of Readings

This schedule is subject to change.

Unless otherwise noted, all readings not included in the required texts are available for download and for reading online at the course’s Blackboard site.  On Blackboard, this course is listed under: 09F HISTORY OF ENGLAND, 1688-1832 (39915 for History and 36460 for European Studies).  All assigned readings not included in the required texts will be available as Adobe PDFs or as website links in the “Course Documents” section of the Blackboard site.

WEEK ONE

Thursday, August 27 – Introduction

No readings.

WEEK TWO

Tuesday, September 1 – Background I: The Social and Economic Development of England in the Late Medieval and Early Modern Periods

No readings.

Thursday, September 3 – Background II: The Political and Religious Development of England in the Late Medieval and Early Modern Periods

1. Christopher Hill, The Century of Revolution, 1603-1714, pp. 6-10, 36-62, and 94-123 [Blackboard].

WEEK THREE

Tuesday, September 8 – England at the Restoration

1. Monod, Imperial Island, pp. 3-48.

Thursday, September 10 – The World Turned Right Side Up?: The End of the Commonwealth and the Restoration of the Stuart Monarchy

1. John Fell, The Interest of England Stated (1659) [Blackboard].

2. Roger L’Estrange, A Plea for Limited Monarchy (1660) [Blackboard].

WEEK FOUR

Tuesday, September 15 – Socio-Economic Change in the Later Seventeenth Century: Commercialization, the Rise of the Public Sphere, and Overseas Expansion

1. Pincus, England’s Glorious Revolution, 1688-1689, pp. 55-68.

2. Excerpts from Nicholas Barbon, A Discourse of Trade (1690) [Blackboard].

3. Monod, Imperial Island, pp. 78-79 and 82-95.

Thursday, September 17 – The Return of Political Turbulence: From the Early Restoration Consensus to the Exclusion Crisis (1678-1681) and the Tory Reaction (1681-1685)

1. Monod, Imperial Island, pp. 49-68.

2. Steve Pincus, “’Coffee Politicians Does Create’: Coffeehouses and Restoration Political Culture,” Journal of Modern History, Vol. 67, No. 4 (December 1995): 807-834 [Blackboard].  Please note: this article is not contained in the required Pincus book; it is available on the course’s Blackboard site.

3. Excerpts from Andrew Marvell, An Account of the Growth of Popery and Arbitrary Government in England (1677) [Blackboard].

4. Pincus, England’s Glorious Revolution, 1688-1689, pp. 139-145.

WEEK FIVE

Tuesday, September 22 – James II and the Modernization of Stuart Absolutism

1. Pincus, England’s Glorious Revolution, 1688-1689, pp. 11-15, 71-74, 82-86, 103-107, and 132-137.

2. Steve Pincus, “Chapter Six: The Practice of Catholic Modernity,” in Steve Pincus, 1688: The First Modern Revolution, pp. 143-178 [Blackboard].  Please note: this chapter is not contained in the required Pincus book; it is available on the course’s Blackboard site.

3. Monod, Imperial Island, pp. 79-82.

Thursday, September 24 – The Revolutionary Transformation of England, Part I: The Glorious Revolution of 1688-1689 and the Defeat of Stuart Absolutism

1. Monod, Imperial Island, pp. 68-77.

2. Pincus, England’s Glorious Revolution, 1688-1689, pp. 1-11, 15-33, and 37-49.

WEEK SIX

Tuesday, September 29 – The Revolutionary Transformation of England, Part II: The Reorientation of the English State, the Consolidation of the Parliamentary Supremacy, and the Origins of the Financial Revolution

1. Pincus, England’s Glorious Revolution, 1688-1689, pp. 69-71, 75-82, 94-102, 112-123, and 128-131.

2. Monod, Imperial Island, pp. 97-109.

Thursday, October 1 – Post-Revolutionary England and the Early European Enlightenment: John Locke and the Vision of a New Society

1. Jacob, The Enlightenment, pp. 1-22 and 73-93.

2. Pincus, England’s Glorious Revolution, 1688-1689, pp. 147-167.

[The first paper assignment will be handed out today.]

WEEK SEVEN

Tuesday, October 6 – The Wars against France, the Growth of Political Conflict, and the Union with Scotland

1. Monod, Imperial Island, pp. 109-116.

2. Excerpts from Jonathan Swift, The Examiner (1710) [Blackboard].

3. Joseph Trapp, The Character and Principles of the Present Sett of Whigs (1712) [Blackboard].

4. Thomas Bradbury, The True Happiness of a Good Government (1714) [Blackboard].

Thursday, October 8 – Counter-Revolution Averted, Part I: The Tory Resurgence

1. Monod, Imperial Island, pp. 117-121.

2. Henry Sacheverell, The Perils of False Brethren (1709) [Blackboard].

3. Jonathan Swift, The Conduct of the Allies (1711) [Blackboard].

[The first paper assignment is due at the beginning of class.]

WEEK EIGHT

Tuesday, October 13 – Counter-Revolution Averted, Part II: The Early Years of the Hanoverian Settlement and the South Sea Crisis

1. Monod, Imperial Island, pp. 122-131.

2. Francis Atterbury, English Advice to the Freeholders of England (1714) [Blackboard].

3. Benjamin Hoadly, The Nature of the Kingdom, or Church, of Christ (1717) [Blackboard].

4. Jacob, The Enlightenment, pp. 137-156.

Thursday, October 15 – Walpole and the Coming of Political Stability

1. Monod, Imperial Island, pp. 145-152.

2. J. H. Plumb, England in the Eighteenth Century (Excerpts 1), pp. 11-67 [Blackboard].

WEEK NINE

Tuesday, October 20 – Commercial Society and the Enlightenment in Britain and Europe

1. Monod, Imperial Island, pp. 170-184.

2. Isaac Kramnick, The Portable Enlightenment Reader, pp. 242-254, 280-287, and 480-496 [Blackboard].  This assignment includes: Bernard Mandeville, “The Fable of the Bees” (1705/1714); Adam Smith, “The Impartial Spectator” (1759); Joseph Addison, “The Royal Exchange” (1711); Benjamin Franklin, “Industry and the Way to Wealth” (1771-1784 and 1732-1757); and David Hume, “Of Luxury” (1742).

3. Jacob, The Enlightenment, pp. 22-55, 114-137, and 156-159.

Thursday, October 22 – The Defenders and Critics of Commercial Society

1. Excerpts from Daniel Defoe, A Tour thro’ the Whole Island of Great Britain (1724) [Blackboard].

2. Excerpts (Part 1) from David Hume, Essays, Moral, Political, and Literary (1742 and 1752) [Blackboard].

3. Excerpts from John Brown, An Estimate of the Manners and Principles of the Times (1756) [Blackboard].

4. Jacob, The Enlightenment, pp. 55-59 and 177-201.

WEEK TEN

Tuesday, October 27 – The Whig Oligarchy and Its Patriot Discontents

1. J. H. Plumb, England in the Eighteenth Century (Excerpts 2), pp. 68-76 [Blackboard]

2. Monod, Imperial Island, pp. 152-157.

3. Excerpts from Henry St. John, Viscount Bolingbroke, The Idea of a Patriot King (1738) [Blackboard].

Thursday, October 29 – The Revival of Global Warfare and Domestic Political Conflict

1. Monod, Imperial Island, pp. 157-163.

2. Excerpts from John Perceval, Earl of Egmont, Faction Detected, by the Evidence of Facts (1743) [Blackboard].

3. Excerpts (Part 2) from David Hume, Essays Moral, Political, and Literary (1742 and 1752) [Blackboard].

WEEK ELEVEN

Tuesday, November 3 – The Great War for Empire, Part I: British Overseas Expansion and the Outbreak of the Seven Years’ War

1. Monod, Imperial Island, pp. 190-197.  

2. J. H. Plumb, England in the Eighteenth Century (Excerpts 3), pp. 105-115 [Blackboard].

Thursday, November 5 – The Great War for Empire, Part II: The Rise of Radical Whiggery and the Annus Mirabilis of 1759  

1. Monod, Imperial Island, pp. 163-169 and 197-204.

2. Excerpts from John Almon, Anecdotes of the Life of the Right Hon. William Pitt, Earl of Chatham (3 vols., 1797) [Blackboard].

[The second paper assignment will be handed out today.]

WEEK TWELVE

Tuesday, November 10 – Movie and Short Lecture on “The Crisis and Transformation of the British Empire”

1. No readings.

2. In-class movie: The Wrong Empire, Episode 11 of A History of Britain, BBC documentary series written and presented by Simon Schama. 

Thursday, November 12 – The Accession of George III and the Politics of Peace

1. Monod, Imperial Island, pp. 205-215.

2. J. H. Plumb, England in the Eighteenth Century (Excerpts 4), pp. 116-123 [Blackboard].

3. Excerpts from Israel Maudit, Considerations on the Present German War (1760) [Blackboard].

4. Excerpts from The Monitor (1762 and 1763) [Blackboard].

5. Excerpts from Tobias Smollett, The Briton (1762 and 1763) [Blackboard].

6. Excerpts from John Wilkes, The North Briton (1762 and 1763) [Blackboard].

[The second paper assignment is due at the beginning of class.]

WEEK THIRTEEN

Tuesday, November 17 – Toward the New Toryism: George III and the End of the Whig Supremacy

1. Excerpts from Horace Walpole, Memoirs of the Reign of King George III, ed. Derek Jarrett (New Haven, 2000) [Blackboard].

2. Philip Francis, A Letter from the Cocoa Tree, to the Country Gentlemen (1762) [Blackboard].

3. Excerpts from An Address to the Cocoa-Tree from a Whig.  And a Consultation on the Subject of a Standing Army (1763) [Blackboard].

4. The True Whig Displayed.  Comprehending Cursory Remarks on the Address to the Cocoa-Tree.  By a Tory (1762) [Blackboard].

Thursday, November 19 – The New Tory Imperialism in North America and South Asia

1. Thomas C. Barrow, “A Project for Imperial Reform: “Hints Respecting the Settlement for our American Provinces,” 1763,” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol. 24, No. 1 (January 1967): 108-126 [Blackboard].

2. Robert Clive, “Letter to Secretary of State William Pitt, 7 January 1759” [Blackboard].

3. Excerpts from The Monitor (1764) [Blackboard].

4. Thomas Paine, “Reflections on the Life and Death of Lord Clive,” (1775) [Blackboard].

5. Josiah Tucker, The Case of Going to War, For the Sake of Procuring, Enlarging, or Securing of Trade, Considered in a New Light (1763) [Blackboard].  

WEEK FOURTEEN

Tuesday, November 24 – The Crisis of the 1760s and 1770s: Radical Whiggery, the New Toryism, and the Break-Up of the First British Empire

1. Monod, Imperial Island, pp. 215-237.

2. John Brewer, Party Ideology and Popular Politics at the Accession of George III, pp. 201-216 [Blackboard].

3. J. H. Plumb, England in the Eighteenth Century (Excerpts 5), pp. 124-132 [Blackboard].

4. John Wilkes’s speeches in the House of Commons on crisis and war in North America (1775), in The Parliamentary History of England, Vol. 18: 1774-1777 (London, 1813), pp. 234-244 [Blackboard].

5. Debate in the House of Commons on John Wilkes’s motion “for a more equal representation of the people in Parliament, “ 21 March 1776, in The Parliamentary History of England, Vol. 18: 1774-1777 (London, 1813), pp. 1,286-1,298 [Blackboard].  

6. Excerpts from Samuel Johnson, Taxation No Tyranny; An Answer to the Resolutions and Address of the American Congress (1775) [Blackboard].

Thursday, November 26 – Thanksgiving holiday.

No readings.

WEEK FIFTEEN

Tuesday, December 1 – The New Conservative Consensus and the Consolidation of the Second British Empire

1. Linda Colley, “The Apotheosis of George III: Loyalty, Royalty and the British Nation, 1760-1820,” Past & Present, No. 102 (February 1984): 94-129 [Blackboard].

2. Monod, Imperial Island, pp. 237-240 and 283-295.

3. Jack P. Greene, “William Knox’s Explanation for the American Revolution,” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol. 30, No. 2 (April 1973): 293-306 [Blackboard].

Thursday, December 3 – Toward the Future: The Coming of the Industrial and French Revolutions

1. Monod, Imperial Island, pp. 241-258, 301-315, and 259-260.  Please do these assigned readings in the order listed here.

[The take-home final exam will be handed out today.]

The take-home final exams are due at the instructor’s office (Garrison 0.122) by 12:00 PM (noon) on Tuesday, December 15.

EUS 346 • England In The 19th Century

35610 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm UTC 4.112
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These courses cover the topics of European Anthropology, Geography, History, and Sociology

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