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Douglas Biow, Director MEZ 3.126, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-3470

Mariah D. Wade

Associate Professor Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin

Mariah D. Wade

Contact

  • Phone: 512-232-4876
  • Office: SAC 4.146
  • Office Hours: Spring 2011 - Wednesday 1pm-3pm, and by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: C3200

EUS 346 • Great Discovs In Archaeology

35659 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 0.112
(also listed as ANT 326F )
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These courses cover the topics of European Anthropology, Geography, History, and Sociology

EUS 346 • Great Discovs In Archaeology

36330 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am UTC 3.134
(also listed as ANT 326F )
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These courses cover the topics of European Anthropology, Geography, History, and Sociology

EUS 305 • Intro To European Studies

35945 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WEL 3.266
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Europe is a patchwork of countries with long, connected and often contentious histories. The creation and continuing expansion of the European Union brought together very different political entities, cultures and languages. Faced with the processes of Europeanization and globalization, individual countries countered the fear and risk of loss of national identity with an emphasis on, and the protection of, symbolic products, such as Champagne and cheeses from France, lace from Ireland or Port wine from Portugal. In the first part of this course we will learn the basics of the historical background of the European Union, its institutions, policies and governance principles. In the second part of the course we will explore how symbols and products play a role in maintaining and reinforcing regionalism and national identities and in the process help to revive local traditions and crafts.   

EUS 113 • Prep For Study Abroad In Eur

35995 • Fall 2010
Meets T 500pm-600pm PAR 308
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This one-hour course provides a brief introduction to European politics, history, culture, and contemporary society for students planning to study abroad in Europe within the next year.  The course consists of presentations on eight (9) different European countries by faculty from UT’s Center for European Studies, Study Abroad staff and international students. 

Each faculty presenter will provide a brief overview of some element of a country’s history, society, contemporary politics, and/or culture that he or she considers useful for an undergraduate who is planning to spend a semester or more abroad.  Students are not expected to prepare readings for this class, but should pay close attention to each lecture and be prepared to engage with new ideas presented in the first part of the hour.  The faculty presentations will include central current issues, including some controversial ones and the final 20 minutes of those class periods will be devoted to discussion about that country.  Each student will be required to submit in writing two thoughtful questions that pertain to something learned in each of the previous two sessions (one about each country) at the beginning of each meeting with the exchange students.

EUS 113 is open to students from all colleges.  Because the course (which can be taken only on a CR/NC basis) is predominantly structured around presentations and student participation in class discussions, weekly attendance and regular participation are required. 

EUS 113 • Prep For Study Abroad In Eur

36435 • Fall 2009
Meets T 500pm-600pm PAR 308
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EUS 113

Introduction to Study Abroad in Europe: Fall 2009

Meets: T 5-6 p.m. in PAR 308

Dr. Mariah Wade:

Office: EPS 1.204; Telephone: 232-4876; Email: m.wade@mail.utexas.edu

 

Description:

This one-hour course provides a brief introduction to European politics, history, culture, and contemporary society for students planning to study abroad in Europe within the next year.  The course consists of presentations on nine (9) different European countries by faculty from UT’s Center for European Studies, Study Abroad staff and international students. 

 

Each faculty presenter will provide a brief overview of some element of a country’s history, society, contemporary politics, and/or culture that he or she considers useful for an undergraduate who is planning to spend a semester or more abroad.  Students are not expected to prepare readings for this class, but should pay close attention to each lecture and be prepared to engage with new ideas.  The faculty presentations will include central current issues, including some controversial ones. The final 20 minutes of those class periods will be devoted to discussion about that country.  Each student will be required to submit, in writing, two thoughtful questions that pertain to something learned in each of the previous two sessions (one about each country) at the beginning of each meeting with the exchange students.

 

EUS 113 is open to students from all colleges.  Because the course (which can be taken only on a CR/NC basis) is predominantly structured around presentations and student participation in class discussions, weekly attendance and regular participation are required.

 

Syllabus and class schedule

September 1

Introduction

Prof. Wade

September 8

Italy

Prof. Douglas Biow

September 15

Germany

Prof. Kit Belgum

September 22

England and Netherlands

Prof. Janine Barchas

September 29

France

Michael Johnson

October 6

Study Abroad

Alejandra Zamorano

Study Abroad staff

October 13

Czech Republic

Filip Zachoval

October 20

Spain

TBA

October 27

Spain

Intl Student

November 3

Germany

Christina Koch

November 10

England/Netherlands

Intl Student

November 17

Italy/France

Intl Student

November 24

Portugal

Prof. Wade and students

December 1

Conclusion

 

 

 

EUS 346 • Great Discoveries In Archaeol

36450 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 WAG 101
(also listed as ANT 324L )
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Course Title: Great Discoveries in Archaeology

ANT 324L (Unique #30445)

EUS 346 (Unique #36450)

TTH  9:30-11:00

WAG 101

Fall 2009

 

Instructor:     Dr. Mariah F. Wade

                        Office: EPS 1.204

Office Hours:     T 11:00 – 1:00 PM or by appointment

                        Telephone: 512-232-4876; Email: m.wade@mail.utexas.edu

Teaching Assistants:

            Ms. Eunice Garza:

 Office hrs: TH 8:30-9:30 am or by appointment.              Email: eunicecgarza@yahoo.com

            Mr. Shawn Marceaux:

Office hrs: T 11:00-12.00 or by appointment.  Email: shawnmarceaux@mail.utexas.edu

Office: EPS 4.110; Telephone: 512-232-6297

 

Course Description:

Archaeology shapes the way we understand the human past, and the history of archaeology was shaped by the great discoveries in archaeology and the people who made them. This course surveys the stories and myths behind some of those discoveries as well as the background of the discoverers. In the process we will discuss how they acquired knowledge, formulated hypotheses, and the impact their early discoveries had on the ways we know the world, think about ourselves, and on how archaeology is practiced today. For instance, things that today we take for granted, such as travel agencies and postcards, or how we understand the politics of modern archaeology and our role in them, or the claims of countries for the return of art objects are all connected to the history of archeology and its discoverers.

 

Requirements: Upper division standing or consent of the instructor.

 

Required Text Books:

1996 Eyewitness to Discovery edited by Brian Fagan

 Frauds, Myths and Mysteries, Science and Pseudoscience in Archaeology Kenneth L. Feder (most recent edition).

Both books are available at the UT CO-OP. Please see announcement on Blackboard

Feder’s textbook has a website

http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/0072869488/information_center_view0/

 

 Supplementary Readings and maps will be in Electronic Reserves

 

Policies and Administrative details

  • Pre-requisites                        
  • There are no pre-requisites for this course other than those shown above.
  • Attendance                        
  • I will not take attendance, but failure to attend class may result in a poor grade because most of the exam material will come from lectures and discussions in class.
  • Class participation            
  • Students who do not participate in the class discussions will not be
  • penalized, but those who do will be rewarded as their questions and comments will enhance the discussion and benefit everyone.
  • Blackboard                        
  • Lecture materials will be placed on Blackboard after the class. Other materials will be placed in the Course Page at ERes
  • Test policy                        
  • There will be no make-up tests, except when the absence is unavoidable in which case the student is expected to contact me, and I will require proof of the problem.
  • Tests                                    
  • Exams will include a mixture of short answers, identifications and mini-essays. Fact sheets provided before the exam will include material for questions and topics for the mini-essays.
  • Poster Project                        
  • Information on the Poster Project will be given later in class. As the title indicates, the student will be expected to create a poster that will include text and images related to a topic, to an archaeologist and his or her discovery, or to an archaeological site. All projects must be related to course material unless the student has obtained prior consent from the instructor.  Each student will give a 3 to 5 minute class presentation on the finished product.
  • Scholastic honesty            
  • Scholastic dishonesty will not be tolerated and the rules of the University of Texas will apply. Please make sure that you are well aware of the content of these rules by visiting this site:
  • http://www.cwrl.utexas.edu/integrity/

Plagiarism                       

You may also want to see these other sites, which include information about plagiarism and how to deal with web sources. Use of web material, particularly text, has to be referenced as completely as if you were dealing with a library book.

  • http://newark.rutgers.edu/%7Eehrlich/plagiarism598.html
  • http://www.indiana.edu/%7Ewts/wts/plagiarism.html
  • Computers                        
  • Students have access to the Student Microcomputer Facility (SMF). Please visit this site for more information: http://www.utexas.edu/smf/
  • Disabilities                        
  • The University of Texas at Austin provides students with qualified disabilities with academic adjustments to meet their needs. For more information please visit this site: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/ssd/ or call 471-6259. If you have a disability please let me know at the beginning of classes. 
  • Cell phones                        
  • Please make sure that your cell phones are turned off while in the classroom.
  • According to University Rules any recording of lectures is not permitted, unless the instructor has granted permission.
  • Contact:                        
  • You can contact me or the TAs by email, by coming to the office hours, or by appointment.  Emails received after 10:00 pm will not be answered until the following day.

 

Evaluation and Grading:

            Tests #1 and # 2: 20 points each.

            Students can elect to drop, or not to take, one of these 2 tests). NOTE: Only one of these two test grades counts to the final grade.

            2 take home assignments: 10 points each

            Test # 3: 30 points
            Poster Project: 30 points

 

Assignments:

  • Reading assignments have to be completed before class.
  • There are no make – up tests (see above)
  • Class attendance is expected (see above)

 

Schedule

 

Week 1

August 27

Introduction           

 

Week 2

September 1-3

Human Origins

           

Week 3

September 8-10

Time is of the essence: Bones, tools and humankind

 

Week 4

September 15-17

Whose skull is it, anyway?

           

 

Week 5

September 22-24

Egypt and the Near East

But can they write?

 

Week 6

September 29 -October 1

Egypt and Near East

                                    TEST 1 – October 1st

                       

Week 7

October 6-8

Egypt and Near East

 

Week 8

October 13-15

Greece and the Aegean

 

Week 9

October 20-22                       

Greece and the Aegean                       

                                   

TEST 2 - October 22nd  -Optional test – Upgrade or make-up test

 

Week 10

October 27-29

Europe

 

Week 11

November 3-5

Africa

 

Week 12

November 10-12

Asia and the Pacific

 

Week 13

November 17-19

North America                       

TEST 3 – November 19th

 

Week 14

November 24 (Thanksgiving Holiday – 26-28)

South America

 

Week 15

December 1-3

            Conclusions and Group discussions of Poster Projects.

 

 

What you should expect to get (and know!) when you finish this course

 

A sense of history and the importance of archaeology to the understanding of humankind and its achievements and failures

q  The history of archaeology and its relevance to modern thought: archaeology helps us to understand how humans leave their footprints in the physical world.

q  The interconnectedness of scientific thought: the history of archaeology is part of the history of geology, paleontology, biology, zoology, geography, political history…

q  The discoverers, their discoveries, and the historical context that affected both.

q  How and why the early history of archaeology raised questions that led to the development of modern archaeological techniques.

q  A synthetic chronology of major archaeological discoveries and events.

q  The politics and reasons that lead modern countries to claim the return of art objects.

q  A deeper understanding of how colonization affected the development of archaeology and archaeological thought, and how the politics of gender directed the ways archaeologists viewed humankind and its achievements.

q  The historical links between archaeology and travel, photography and spying.

 

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