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Douglas Biow, Director MEZ 3.126, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-3470

Tracie M. Matysik

Associate Professor Ph.D., 2001, Cornell University

Tracie M. Matysik

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-7251
  • Office: GAR 3.402
  • Office Hours: Spring 2011 - Th 1-3 p.m.
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

Biography

Research interests

She works in the field of modern European intellectual history, with a particular focus on the evolution of secularism as a social movement. At present she is working on a book manuscript provisionally entitled "Spinoza Matters: Pantheism, Materialism, and Alternative Enlightenment Legacies in Nineteenth-Century Europe." She is also producing an anthology of writings by women from across Europe who were influenced directly or indirectly by the thought of Friedrich Nietzsche.

Courses taught

Modern European and German history with a focus on European intellectual history and the history of sexuality.

 

EUS 346 • Marx And Western Marxism

36607 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 600pm-730pm GAR 3.116
(also listed as CTI 335, HIS 362G, PHL 334K )
show description

This course introduces students to the writings of Karl Marx as well as to those of his westernintellectual successors in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It will treat the nineteenthcenturycontext of industrialization and democratization in Europe in which Marx formulated hissocial, political, and philosophical critique, as well as the theoretical and philosophical legacythat followed through the twentieth century. The course will not focus on Soviet Marxism, butwill examine how western Marxism’s critique of capital evolved in complex relationship to theexistence of Soviet Marxism. We will spend roughly eight weeks reading Marx’s writings, andthen seven weeks reading his western intellectual successors (including writings from RosaLuxemburg, Georg Lukács, Walther Benjamin, Theodor Adorno, Antonio Gramsci, Jean-PaulSartre, Louis Althusser, Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri, and Slavoj Žižek). Students shouldexpect to read significant amounts of philosophy and social theory.

Texts:

Robert C. Tucker, ed., The Marx-Engels Reader, 2nd edition (New York: Norton, 1978).Vincent Barnett, Marx (New York: Routledge, 2009).

Grading:

First paper: 25%

Second paper: 25%

Option II or III: 10- to 12-page paper: 50%

Final Journal: 30%!Class Presentation: 10%

Participation (including attendance and also sustained constructive contribution to classdiscussion): 10%

EUS 306 • Reason & Its Discontents

36340 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 330pm-500pm BIO 301
(also listed as CTI 310, HIS 317N )
show description

This course introduces students to themes  and methods  in the study  of European Intellectual History. We will address what it means to read philosophy and social theory  in historical context, understanding close reading  as historical  methodology. In terms  of chronological focus, the course will concentrate on the modern  era broadly understood, roughly  1600-present. We will examine  how reason came to be a dominant and contested category  of philosophical inquiry in the seventeenth century and then follow  its vicissitudes into the twentieth century. Along the way we will witness the embrace  and rejection of what has come to be known  as the "Enlightenment tradition." Readings will be primarily philosophical and socia l ­ theoreticaI.

 

Readings (subject to change):

 

Rene Descartes, Meditations on First Philosophy

Baruch Spinoza, Short Treatise  on God, Man, and His Well-Being

Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

Friedrich  Nietzsche, On the Birth  of Tragedy

Jurgen Habermas, selections

Michel Foucault, Madness and Civilization

 

 

Grading:

Short  paper (four  pages): 25°/o

Short  paper (four  pages): 30°/o

Final exam:  35°/o

Participation: 10°/o

EUS 346 • Spinoza And Modernity

36460 • Spring 2013
Meets T 500pm-800pm GAR 0.128
(also listed as CTI 335, HIS 362G, J S 364, PHL 354 )
show description

Baruch Spinoza, the seventeenth-century Dutch-Jewish philosopher of Portuguese descent, has been alternately labeled the instigator of the “radical enlightenment” (Jonathan Israel), the “renegade Jew who gave us modernity” (Rebecca Goldstein), the betrayer of the Jewish tradition (Hermann Cohen), a “savage anomaly” in the western intellectual tradition (Antonio Negri), and the theorist of the one kind of god in which a physicist of the twentieth century might conceivably believe (Albert Einstein).  In his own seventeenth-century Amsterdam context, his writings – and even mere rumor of them – were enough to earn him full excommunication from the Jewish community.  Yet in subsequent centuries those scandalous writings have become a crucial chapter in histories of western philosophy.  G. W. F. Hegel, for instance, would argue that only after Spinoza could one really begin to philosophize properly.  This course will introduce students to the core of Spinoza’s writings that have produced such diverse reactions over the centuries, as well as to exemplary moments in those reactions.  We will examine Spinoza’s refusal of a transcendent god or ideal, as well as of the mind-body dualism so prominent in western thought, understanding along the way the unique intellectual modernity he made possible. Reading

Baruch Spinoza, “Ethics”; “Theological-Political Treatise”; and “Political Treatise,” all in Spinoza: Complete Works, ed. Michael Morgan, trans. Samuel Shirley (Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing, 2002), ISBN: 0872206203.

Genevieve Lloyd, Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Spinoza and the Ethics (New York:  Routledge, 1996), ISBN:  0415107822.

 

Grading (using the +/- rubric):

  • 12- to 15-page paper: 45% (includes evaluation of outline and/or draft)
  • Presentation: 20%
  • Final Journal: 25% (includes credit for timely submission of quality response papers)
  • Participation: 10% (includes attendance and regular and constructive contribution to class discussion)

EUS 346 • Marx And Western Marxism

36415 • Fall 2012
Meets T 500pm-800pm GAR 2.128
(also listed as CTI 335, HIS 362G )
show description

This course introduces students to the writings of Karl Marx as well as to those of his westernintellectual successors in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It will treat the nineteenthcenturycontext of industrialization and democratization in Europe in which Marx formulated hissocial, political, and philosophical critique, as well as the theoretical and philosophical legacythat followed through the twentieth century. The course will not focus on Soviet Marxism, butwill examine how western Marxism’s critique of capital evolved in complex relationship to theexistence of Soviet Marxism. We will spend roughly eight weeks reading Marx’s writings, andthen seven weeks reading his western intellectual successors (including writings from RosaLuxemburg, Georg Lukács, Walther Benjamin, Theodor Adorno, Antonio Gramsci, Jean-PaulSartre, Louis Althusser, Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri, and Slavoj Žižek). Students shouldexpect to read significant amounts of philosophy and social theory.

 

GRADING (using the +/- system)

First paper: 25%

Second paper: 25%

Option II or III: 10- to 12-page paper: 50%

Final Journal: 30%!Class Presentation: 10%

Participation (including attendance and also sustained constructive contribution to classdiscussion): 10%

TEXTS

Robert C. Tucker, ed., The Marx-Engels Reader, 2nd edition (New York: Norton, 1978).Vincent Barnett, Marx (New York: Routledge, 2009).

EUS 346 • Marx And Western Marxism

36520 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GAR 2.112
(also listed as HIS 362G, PHL 334K )
show description

 

Course Description:

This course introduces students to the writings of Karl Marx as well as to those of his western intellectual successors in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  It will treat the nineteenth-century context of industrialization and democratization in Europe in which Marx formulated his social, political, and philosophical critique, as well as the theoretical and philosophical legacy that followed through the twentieth century.  The course will not focus on Soviet Marxism, but will examine how western Marxism’s critique of capital evolved in complex relationship to the existence of Soviet Marxism.  We will spend roughly eight weeks reading Marx’s writings, and then seven weeks reading his western intellectual successors (including writings from Rosa Luxemburg, Georg Lukács, Walther Benjamin, Theodor Adorno, Antonio Gramsci, Jean-Paul Sartre, Louis Althusser, Juliet Mitchell, Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri, and Slavoj Žižek).  Students should expect to read significant amounts of philosophy and social theory.

 

Texts (subject to change):

Robert C. Tucker, ed., The Marx-Engels Reader, 2nd edition (New York: Norton, 1978).

Karl Marx, Capital, Vol. I, trans. Ben Fowkes (New York: Penguin, 1992).

Roger S. Gottlieb, ed., An Anthology of Western Marxism (New York: Oxford, 1989).

 

Grading:

12- to 15-page paper:     50%

Final Journal:            20%

Class Presentation:        20%

Class Participation:        10%

 

EUS 346 • Spinoza And Modernity

36525 • Spring 2011
Meets M 400pm-700pm GAR 0.128
(also listed as HIS 362G, J S 364, PHL 354, R S 357 )
show description

 

Spinoza and Modernity

EUS 347, HIS 362G, JS 364, PHL 354, RS 357

 

Course Description:

Baruch Spinoza, the seventeenth-century Dutch-Jewish philosopher of Portuguese descent, has been alternately labeled the instigator of the “radical enlightenment” (Jonathan Israel), the “renegade Jew who gave us modernity” (Rebecca Goldstein), the betrayer of the Jewish tradition (Hermann Cohen), a “savage anomaly” in the western intellectual tradition (Antonio Negri), and the theorist of the one kind of god in which a physicist of the twentieth century might conceivably believe (Albert Einstein).  In his own seventeenth-century Amsterdam context, his writings – and even mere rumor of them – were enough to earn him full excommunication from the Jewish community.  Yet in subsequent centuries those scandalous writings have become a crucial chapter in histories of western philosophy.  G. W. F. Hegel, for instance, would argue that only after Spinoza could one really begin to philosophize properly.  This course will introduce students to the core of Spinoza’s writings that have produced such diverse reactions over the centuries, as well as to exemplary moments in those reactions.  We will examine Spinoza’s refusal of a transcendent god or ideal, as well as of the mind-body dualism so prominent in western thought, understanding along the way the unique intellectual modernity he made possible.     

 

Texts (subject to change)

•Baruch Spinoza, The Essential Spinoza: Ethics and Related Writings, trans. Samuel Shirley, ed. 

    Michael L. Morgan (Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing, 2006), ISBN:  0872208036.

•Baruch Spinoza, The Theological-Political Treatise, trans. Samuel Shirley (Indianapolis: 

    Hackett Publishing, 2001), ISBN:  0872206076.

•Genevieve Lloyd, Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Spinoza and the Ethics (New York: 

    Routledge, 1996), ISBN:  0415107822.

•Warren Montag and Ted Stolze, eds., The New Spinoza (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota 

    Press, 2008), ISBN:  0816625417.

 

Grading:

12- to 15-page paper:     50%

Final Journal:            20%

Class Presentation:        20%

Class Participation:        10%

 

EUS 347 • Eur Intel Hist,Enlght-Nietzs-W

36500 • Fall 2009
Meets MW 300pm-430pm CBA 4.326
(also listed as HIS 332G )
show description

Course Description:

This course aims to introduce students to the most significant philosophical, social-theoretical, literary, and artistic currents in Europe in the "long nineteenth century."  After looking briefly at the Enlightenment, it will follow the
trials and tribulations of nineteenth-century thinkers as they sought to come to terms with intellectual secularization.  In particular, it will examine the impact of secularization on conceptions of the self and social order.  As a course in intellectual history, it will ask how intellectual trends relate to their historical contexts, e.g. political events and socio-economic developments.  Students should complete the course with an historically informed understanding of major nineteenth-century intellectual movements: romanticism, conservatism, liberalism, utilitarianism, Marxism and socialism, aestheticism, nihilism, and positivism.                                  

Course Expectations:  

Reading: Each week there will be a substantial primary source reading. Individual books are available for purchase at the University Co-op.  They are also on reserve at PCL Reserves.  Readings that are not available for purchase at the Co-op will be available on E-Reserves.

The individual books to be bought at the University Co-op are:
*G.W.F. Hegel, Reason in History, trans. R. Hartman (New York:  Macmillan, 1953).
*Soren Kierkegaard, Fear and Trembling (New York: Penguin, 1985).
*Robert C. Tucker, ed., The Marx-Engels Reader (New York: Norton, 1978).
*John Stuart Mill, The Basic Writings of John Stuart Mill, ed. J. B. Schneewind (New
York: Modern Library, 2002).
*Friedrich Nietzsche, The Gay Science (New York: Vintage, 1974).
Recommended:
*Joan Neuberger, Europe and the Making of Modernity (New York:  Oxford University Press,
2005).

Participation:  Regular attendance and participation in class discussions is required. Absences will be excused only for documented family and medical emergency (doctor's note, obituary, etc.), or religious holiday.  One unexcused absence will be overlooked.  Each subsequent unexcused absence will result in a half-grade deduction to the participation grade.  No student attending less than twenty sessions without documented excuse will pass the class.

Assignments

Essays:  Each student will be expected to write two 6-page papers, both of which will be preceded by a substantial outline and elements of a rough draft.  The schedule for these papers is indicated in the Course Schedule below.  Topics will be of your own choosing. Option II: You may opt to write just one longer (12-page) paper that would be due Nov. 24.  This is a good option if there is a topic you want to explore in more detail.  If you choose this option, you must decide early and follow the alternate schedule as indicated in the Course Schedule.

8 Weekly Response Papers and Final Journal of 14 Response Papers:  These 1- to 2-page papers (and no more than two pages!) are due at the beginning of each class session. Students should write a minimum of eight papers, four of which must be written before October 6.   They will not be individually graded throughout the semester, but rather will be marked on a ?system, but their revision and inclusion in the final journal will
be graded.  To qualify towards the fulfillment of this requirement, these papers must be ready for submission at the beginning of the class session on the day that we are to discuss the relevant reading.  Because these reading-response papers are intended to aid in class discussion, I will not be able to accept late submissions.

At the end of the semester, students should compile these papers and submit them with an additional seven entries as a class journal.  Students are welcome to revise the papers in the course of the semester.  A grade will be given to the final journal.  Both original and revised versions of response papers should be included in the journal. A Note on Writing Format:  All writing assignments should be double-spaced and printed in 12-point font with one-inch margins.  They should be well-written, spell-checked, and proofread for grammar and content.  Papers that do not satisfy these expectations may be returned and considered not eligible for completion of the requirement. Grading (on a +/- scale)

First Essay: 30%
Second Essay: 30%
Journal: 30% (includes timely submission of quality response papers)
Class Participation: 10%

Religious Holidays:
Special accommodations can be made if a student must miss class due to a religious holiday.  Please notify me as soon as possible and, in accordance with university policy, no later than two weeks prior to the relevant holiday and anticipated absence.

Accommodations: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-6441 TTY.

A Note on Classroom Etiquette:
   * Please display basic respect for classmates' questions, opinions, and arguments.  Especially in large classes, good discussion is dependent upon a general atmosphere of openness, tolerance, and respect.   
* Please turn off all cell phones before coming into the classroom, and make an effort to avoid other distracting behavior (talking to one another during lecture, arriving late, leaving early, etc.).
   * Laptop computers are allowed solely for the purpose of note-taking.  Any violation of this policy by one student will result in the loss of the privilege to use computers for all students.

Academic Integrity:
Academic integrity will be taken very seriously in this course.  Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure of the assignment, failure in the course, and/or dismissal from the University.  For an overview of University policy regarding scholastic dishonesty, see the website of Student Judicial Services.

COURSE SCHEDULE:


Unit 1: INTRODUCTION AND ENLIGHTENMENT?

Week 1, August 26: Introduction
           W: Introduction to Course, Discussion of Syllabus
  
Week 2, Aug. 1-Sept. 3:
   Reading:     M: Kant, "An Answer to the Question: 'What is Enlightenment?'" (on E-  Reserves)
           W: Kant, "Universal History" (excerpts on E-Reserves)

Week 3, Sept. 7-9:
   Reading:    M: Bentham (on E-Reserves)
           W: Wordsworth ("Preface" and "Tinturn Abbey") (on E-Reserves)

          UNIT 2: ROMANTICISM AND DIALECTICS

Week 4,  September 14-16:
   Reading:    M: Schleiermacher (on E-Reserves)
           W: Hegel, Reason in History, 10-49

Week 5, Sept. 21-23:
   Reading:    M: Hegel, Reason in History, 49-67
           W: Kierkegaard, Fear and Trembling, 41-82

Week 6, Sept. 28-30:    
    Reading:    M: Kierkegaard, Fear and Trembling, 83-108
           W: Peer Review -- in-class (thesis paragraphs and outlines)
          Option II: Paper Topic and Bibliography due, one-paragraph justification of the topic (i.e., what do you want to learn, etc.)

              UNIT 3: SOCIALISM,  MATERIALISM, SCIENCE

Week 7, October 5-7:   Radical Politics, Radical Drama
           M: Flexibility Day
           W:  PAPERS DUE
           Saint-Simon (on e-Reserves)

Week 8, October 12-14:
           M: August Comte
           W:  Woyzeck

Week 9, October 19-21:
   Reading:      M: Marx, in Marx-Engels Reader, 67-93
           W: Marx in  Marx-Engels Reader, 294-329
           Option II: Introduction and Complete Outlines Due

Week 10, October 26-28:
   Reading:    M: Darwin (E-Reserves)
           W: Spencer (E-Reserves)

Week 11, November 2-4:
   Reading:    M: Mill, On Liberty, pp. 1-15; The Subjection of Women, pp. 123-173
           W: Culture Shock

  UNIT 4: ART AND CRITICISM

Week 12, November 9-11
   Reading:    M: Schopenhauer Excerpt (on E-Reserves); Wagner (viewing)
           W:  Rough Drafts Due, Options I and II, in-class peer review

  Week 13, November 16-18:
   Reading:    M: Nietzsche, The Gay Science, Book 4
           W: Nietzsche, The Gay Science, Book 5

Week 14, November 23-25:
   M: PAPERS DUE
   Reading:    M: Lou Andreas-Salomé (on E-Reserves)
                 Helene Stöcker (on E-Reserves)
                 Nelly Melin (on E-Reserves)
           W:  Selections from the Universal Races Congress (on E-Reserves)

Week 15, November 30-December 2:
   Reading:    M: flexibility day (maybe we could read Freud or Durkheim, students choose!)
   Discussion:    W: Nineteenth Century: A Century of the Nation or a Century of Cosmopolitanism?

RECOMMENDED READING:


Nineteenth-Century Surveys:
   Roland Stromberg, European Intellectual History Since 1789
   Joan Neuberger, Europe and the Making of Modernity, 1815-1914
   Peter Gay, Schnitzler's Century

   J. W. Burrow, The Crisis of Reason: European Thought, 1848-1914

Histories of the Self:
   Jerrold Seigel, The Idea of the Self: Thought and Experience in Western Europe since the Seventeenth Century
   Charles Taylor, Sources of the Self: The Making of the Modern Identity
   Raymond Martin and John Barese, The Rise and Fall of Soul and Self: An Intellectual History of Personal Identity
   Donald Kelley, The Descent of Ideas: The History of Intellectual History
   Dominick LaCapra, Rethinking Intellectual History

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