Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
scjs masthead scjs masthead
Robert Abzug, Director CLA 2.402, 305 E 23rd St B3600, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-475-6178

Jonathan Kaplan

Assistant Professor Ph.D. 2010, Harvard University

Jonathan Kaplan

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-9453
  • Office: CAL 503
  • Office Hours: Fall 2014: M 2:10–3 p.m., W 11:30a.m.–12:50 p.m., and by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: F9400

Biography

Jonathan Kaplan is a scholar of Ancient Judaism whose research and teaching focuses on the study of the Hebrew Bible and the history of its interpretation in the Second Temple and early Rabbinic periods. His current book project, tentatively entitled My Perfect One: Typology and Early Rabbinic Reading of Song of Songs, is a study of the interpretations of the Song of Songs contained in the earliest compilations of rabbinic interpretation of the Bible, which are known as the tannaitic midrashim. Prior to joining the faculty of the Department of Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Texas at Austin, he served for two years as a Jacob & Hilda Blaustein Postdoctoral Associate in the Judaic Studies Program and as a Lecturer on Judaic Studies, Religious Studies, and Humanities at Yale University.

Interests

Hebrew Bible, Second Temple Judaism, Dead Sea Scrolls, Rabbinic Judaism, Midrash, Literary Theory

J S 364 • The Dead Sea Scrolls

40706 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm GAR 2.128
(also listed as AHC 330, HIS 364G, MEL 321, MES 342, R S 353D )
show description

For almost seventy years, the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls has influenced significantly our understanding of Second Temple Judaism, the formation of the Bible, and the origins of the religious movements of Christianity and Rabbinic Judaism. This course presents an in-depth study of the Dead Sea Scrolls in order to understand better the development of law, interpretation, ritual, messianism, apocalypticism, and prayer in the late Second Temple period. This course will include discussion of the archaeology of the Qumran community, textual production and transmission in antiquity, scribal practices in antiquity, and pseudonymous authorship.

Texts

VanderKam, James C. The Dead Sea Scrolls Today. Revised Edition. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2010. Vermes, Geza. The Complete Dead Sea Scrolls in English. London: Penguin, 1998.

Grading: 

Class attendance and participation 10%; Quality of midterm examination 20%; Quality of final examination 30%; Quality of two “5 page papers“ 40%.

J S 364 • The Dead Sea Scrolls

40245 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm BUR 224
(also listed as HIS 364G, MEL 321, MES 342, R S 353D )
show description

For almost seventy years, the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls has influenced significantly our understanding of Second Temple Judaism, the formation of the Bible, and the origins of the religious movements of Christianity and Rabbinic Judaism. This course presents an in-depth study of the Dead Sea Scrolls in order to understand better the development of law, interpretation, ritual, messianism, apocalypticism, and prayer in the late Second Temple period. This course will include discussion of the archaeology of the Qumran community, textual production and transmission in antiquity, scribal practices in antiquity, and pseudonymous authorship.

Texts

VanderKam, James C. The Dead Sea Scrolls Today. Revised Edition. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2010. Vermes, Geza. The Complete Dead Sea Scrolls in English. London: Penguin, 1998.

Grading: 

Class attendance and participation 10%; Quality of midterm examination 20%; Quality of final examination 30%; Quality of two “5 page papers“ 40%.

J S 363 • Jerusalem

40063 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAR 101
(also listed as MEL 321, MES 342, R S 358 )
show description

Jerusalem has been described famously as a golden bowl full of scorpions. As this proverb suggests, Jerusalem not only has been regarded as a treasure but also as something that is difficult to possess. This course surveys the often-tumultuous religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia and examines the city's role as a symbolic focus for Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The course examines literary evidence, artifacts, architecture, geography, and iconography to explore the development of the city and how its sacred space and symbolic significance has been shaped by history.

Texts/Readings

Coogan, Michael D. et al., eds. The New Oxford Annotated Bible with the Apocrypha, Augmented Fourth Edition, New Revised Standard Version, College Edition. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010.

The Qur'an. Any modern edition with English translation.

Bahat, Dan & Chaim T. Rubenstein. The Carta Jerusalme Atlas. Third Edition. Carta, 2011.

Cline, Eric H. Jerusalem Besieged: From Ancient Canaan to Modern Israel. Ann Arbor, Mich., 2005.

Montefiore, Simon Sebag. Jerusalem: The Biography. New York: Knopf, 2011.

Grading Policy

Three in-class, one-hour examinationas (60%)

One Cumulative, final examination (30%)

Class attendance (10%)

Publications

“The Song of Songs from the Bible to the Mishnah.” Hebrew Union College Annual 81 (2010/2013): 43–66.

“1 Samuel 8:11–18 as ‘A Mirror for Princes’.” Journal of Biblical Literature 131.4 (2012): 625–42.

“Comfort, O Comfort, Corinth: Grief and Comfort in 2 Corinthians 7:5–13a.” Harvard Theological Review 104 (2011): 433–45.

“The Mesha Inscription and Iron Age II Water Systems.” Journal of Near Eastern Studies 69 (2010): 23–29.

bottom border