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Robert Abzug, Director CLA 2.402, 305 E 23rd St B3600, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-475-6178

Mary Neuburger

Associate Professor Ph.D., 1997, University of Washington

Mary Neuburger

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-7220
  • Office: GAR 3.410
  • Office Hours: On Leave- Fall '09
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

Biography

Research interests

Professor Neuburger's focus is on modern eastern Europe with a specialization in southeastern Europe. Her research interests include urban culture, consumption, commodity exchange, gender and nationalism.

Courses taught

Her courses explore ethnic conflict, nationalism, gender, and other topics in East Central European as well as Balkan history.

 

Recent Publications: 

Professor Neuburger's recently published book, The Orient Within: Muslim Minorites and the Negotiation of Nationhood in Modern Bulgaria (2004), explores the evolution of Bulgarian nationalism in light of encounters with the Islamic past and a Muslim minority presence.

 

 

Interests

modern southeastern Europe, her primary interests include ethnic conflict, nationalism, material culture, and gender

J S 364 • Southeast Europe In 20th Cen

40230 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 212
(also listed as EUS 346, HIS 362G, REE 335 )
show description

Through lecture and discussion this course will provide an in-depth exploration of the key events and developments of Southeastern Europe, the region commonly referred to as the Balkans, in the twentieth century.  After providing some of the basics on geography and pre-20th century developments, we will move on to a detailed investigation of this tumultuous century in a region that was wracked by war, revolution, ethnic conflict, the Holocaust, and 45 years of Communist regimes and Cold War tensions.  We will cover the territories of Romania, Albania, Bulgaria, the former Yugoslavia, and to a lesser extent Greece and Turkey. Key themes will be ethnic identity, nationalism, authoritarianism, resistance, gender and violence. The final chapter of the course will look at the fall of communism in the region and the outbreak of war in the former Yugoslavia.   

Required Texts:

Mark Mazower, The Balkans: A Short History.

John Lampe, Balkans into Southeastern Europe.

Katherine Verdery, What was Socialism and what comes Next

Slavenka Drakulic,  How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed

Zlatko Anguelov, Communism and the Remorse of an Innocent Victimizer.

Emir Sujagic, Postcards from the Grave.

Ismail Kadare,  The Successor.

 

Grading

Grading will be based on a take-home mid-term (30%); an end of quarter in-class exam (30%); a primary document assignment (20%); a map quiz (5%); 5 short quizzes on assigned readings (2% each – 10%); and participation (5%) – based on attendance.  

 

J S 364 • Southeast Europe In 20th Cen

40394 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 1
(also listed as EUS 346, HIS 362G, REE 335 )
show description

Through lecture and discussion this course will provide an in-depth exploration of the key events and developments of Southeastern Europe, the region commonly referred to as the Balkans, in the twentieth century.  After providing some of the basics on geography and pre-20th century developments, we will move on to a detailed investigation of this tumultuous century in a region that was wracked by war, revolution, ethnic conflict, the Holocaust, and Cold War tensions.  We will cover the territories of Romania, Albania, Bulgaria, the former Yugoslavia, and to a lesser extent Greece and Turkey. Key themes will be ethnic identity, nationalism, authoritarianism, resistance, and violence. The final chapter of the course will be the fall of communism in the region and the outbreak of war in Bosnia and Kosovo.   

Texts

Mark Mazower, The Balkans: A Short History.

Leon Trotsky, The War Correspondence of Leon Trotsky: The Balkan Wars 1912-13.

Slavenka Drakulic,  How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed

Kapka Kassabova, Street without a Name: Childhood and Other Misadventures in Bulgaria.

Tzvetan Todorov, Voices from the Gulag: Life and Death in Communist Bulgaria

Eric Stover, Witnesses: War Crimes and the Promise of Justice in the Hague.

Grading

Assignments will include a mid-term (25%), an end of quarter exam (25%), a book review (15%) and a short research assignment (30%).  Participation will be 5% of the grade.   

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