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Robert Abzug, Director CLA 2.402, 305 E 23rd St B3600, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-475-6178

Rebecca Rossen

Assistant Professor Ph.D.(2006), Northwestern University

Rebecca Rossen

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Biography

Professor Rossen is a dance historian and performance scholar currently completing her first book, Dancing Jewish: Jewish Identity in American Modern and Postmodern Dance (Oxford University Press). Before commencing her academic career, she was a Chicago-based dancer and choreographer.

Courses Taught

Professor Rossen teaches dance and performance history, as well as courses that focus on identity (ethnicity, nationality, gender, sexuality, etc.) in performance, including "Jewish Identity in American Performance."

Interests

Ethnicity, nationality, and gender in performance; Jewish identity in American dance and media; Holocaust performance

J S 363 • Jewish Id In Amer Performance

40345 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm WIN 1.148
show description

This course will consider how Jewish artists represent Jewish identity, culture, and history in American performance from the 1920s to the present. Combining the viewing of video and live performance with critical readings, we will examine Jewishness in a wide range of genres including theater, dance, musical theater, film, comedy, and television. Throughout we will consider—what does “Jewish” mean? How is Jewishness performed? What role does gender, race, class, or nationality play in these performances? What role has performance played in shaping our understanding of Jews and Jewish culture in the U.S.? How have Jewish artists addressed themes including anti-Semitism, stereotyping, exile, immigration, assimilation, religion, the Holocaust, Israel, and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? This course is open to ALL students who are interested in the relationship between ethnicity and performance. No knowledge of theater, performance, Judaism, or Jewish culture is required.

Texts for the course may include:

  • Bial, Acting Jewish: Negotiating Ethnicity on the American Stage and Screen
  • Brook, ed., You Should See Yourself!: Jewish Identity and American Postmodern Culture (Rutgers 2006)
  • Kushner, Angels in America: Part I and II
  • Bock and Styne, Fiddler on the Roof
  • Course reader

Students will also watch a variety of performances (theater, dance, musicals, film, television) on video.

Grading (subject to change):

  • 15% participation
  • 10% informal journal responses
  • 10% 3-page performance review
  • 15% 4-5 page paper
  • 20% collaborative presentation
  • 30% 6-8 page final research paper and brief oral presentation

Dr. Rebecca Rossen is a choreographer, dance historian, and performance scholar whose research focuses on Jewish identity in American dance and performance. Her writings on this subject have appeared in TDR: The Drama Review (2011), Feminist Studies (2011), and the anthologies You Should See Yourself!: Jewish Identity and American Postmodern Culture (Rutgers 2006), and The Oxford Handbook of Ethnic Dance (Oxford 2012). Her forthcoming book, Dancing Jewish, will be published by Oxford University Press. See:http://www.finearts.utexas.edu/tad/people/faculty_and_staff/faculty/rossen.cfm

J S 363 • Jewish Ident In Amer Perfrmanc

40065 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 200pm-330pm WIN 1.148
show description

Description: This course will consider how Jewish artists represent Jewish identity, culture, and history in American performance from the 1920s to the present. Combining the viewing of video and live performance with critical readings, we will examine Jewishness in a wide range of genres including theater, dance, musical theater, film, comedy, and television. Throughout we will consider—what does “Jewish” mean? How is Jewishness performed? What role does gender, race, class, or nationality play in these performances? What role has performance played in shaping our understanding of Jews and Jewish culture in the U.S.? How have Jewish artists addressed themes including anti-Semitism, stereotyping, exile, immigration, assimilation, religion, the Holocaust, Israel, and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? This course is open to ALL students who are interested in the relationship between ethnicity and performance. No knowledge of theater, performance, Judaism, or Jewish culture is required.      Texts for the course may include Bial, Acting Jewish: Negotiating Ethnicity on the American Stage and Screen, Brook, ed., You Should See Yourself!: Jewish Identity and American Postmodern Culture (Rutgers 2006), Kushner, Angels in America: Part I and II, Bock and Styne, Fiddler on the Roof, and a course reader. Students will also watch a variety of performances (theater, dance, musicals, film, television) on video.   Grading (subject to change): 15% participation, 10% informal journal responses, 10% 3-page performance review, 15% 4-5 page paper, 20% collaborative presentation, 30% 6-8 page final research paper and brief oral presentation   Dr. Rebecca Rossen is a choreographer, dance historian, and performance scholar whose research focuses on Jewish identity in American dance and performance. Her writings on this subject have appeared in TDR: The Drama Review (2011), Feminist Studies (2011), and the anthologies You Should See Yourself!: Jewish Identity and American Postmodern Culture (Rutgers 2006), and The Oxford Handbook of Ethnic Dance (Oxford 2012). Her forthcoming book, Dancing Jewish, will be published by Oxford University Press. See: http://www.finearts.utexas.edu/tad/people/faculty_and_staff/faculty/rossen.cfm

Publications

Dancing Jewish: Jewish Identity in American Modern and Postmodern Dance (book in progress, under contract with Oxford University Press).

“Uneasy Duets: Contemporary American Dances about Israel and the Mideast Crisis,” TDR: The Drama Review 55:3 (Fall 2011): 40–49.

“Hasidic Drag: Jewishness, Gender, and Transvestitism in the Modern Dances of Pauline Koner and Hadassah,” Feminist Studies 37:2 (Summer 2011).

 

“Teaching History: Ruth St. Denis & Ted Shawn,” Dance Teacher Magazine 29:10 (October 2007): 120–24.

“Teaching History: Mary Wigman,” Dance Teacher Magazine 29: 4 (April 2007): 74–79.


The Jewish Man and His Dancing Shtick: Stock Characterization and Jewish Masculinity in Postmodern Dance,” in You Should See Yourself: Jewish Identity in Postmodern American Culture, Vincent Brook, ed. (Rutgers: Rutgers University Press, 2006), 137–154. 

“Moving Through the Interspace: Emio Greco/PC’s Orfeo ed Euridice,” Opera Quarterly 22: 1 (Winter 2006): 144–47.

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