Department of Classics

On Molds and Markets: What Islamic Molded Ceramics say about Medieval Trade and Taste

Dr. Stephennie Mulder of the University of Texas at Austin will discuss "On Molds and Markets: What Islamic Molded Ceramics say about Medieval Trade and Taste." Please join us for refreshments after the lecture.

Wed, April 2, 2008 | ART 1.110

8:00 PM

In Princeton University's excavations at medieval Balis in Syria in the summer of 2000, two beautifully decorated, 13th century ceramic molds were discovered, each bearing a rare and illuminating feature: the signature of their designer. Aside from the rarity of signed works of art from the premodern Islamic world, these molds are remarkable for being found within a rich archaeological context: a ceramic workshop for the production of unglazed molded or relief-decorated ceramics, along with hundreds of sherds from molded vessels and tools for their manufacture. Produced for local consumption within a thriving medieval domestic economy, these vessels provide an illuminating window into a little-studied aspect of Islamic art: the manufacture and distribution of common pottery, perhaps the most fundamental and ubiquitous of the objects of daily life from the premodern Islamic world.

Sponsored by: Austin Society of the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA), Classics Department

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