Cynthia Osborne


Core FacultyPh.D., Princeton University

Associate Professor
Cynthia Osborne

Contact

Biography


Cynthia Osborne joined The University of Texas at Austin in 2005 as an Assistant Professor at the LBJ School and as an affiliate of the UT Austin Population Research Center. Her teaching and research interests are in the areas of social policy, poverty and inequality, family and child well-being, family demography, and school entry among disadvantaged children.

Prior to joining the LBJ School faculty, Osborne was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Center for Research on Child Wellbeing at Princeton University, where she worked on the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Survey of New Parents. She holds a Ph.D. in demography and public affairs from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University, a master's in public policy from Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, and a master of arts in education from Claremont Graduate University. Previously, Osborne was a middle school teacher in a low-income community in California.

NIH Biosketch

Courses


WGS 393 • Family Policy

46220 • Fall 2015
Meets M 900am-1200pm SRH 3.360

The primary goals of this course are to examine the demographic, economic, and social changes that have taken place in the family over the past several decades and to identify what these changes mean for public policies aimed at strengthening families.  We will address several questions, including: What has happened to the family?  How much help do families need and what type of help?  Who needs help the most?  How successful have policies been at helping families in the past?  What ought government do to help families?  Should government promote marriage?  The focus will primarily be on US federal family policy, but will also consider some state issues and comparative perspectives of policies and demographic changes.  Upon completion of the course, students will:

  • Identify the major demographic, economic, and social changes in the family, and how these changes have occurred differently across demographic groups.
  • Clearly articulate the major theories of family change and identify which demographic group each theory applies to best.
  • Distinguish the causal versus selection effects of family structure and family change.
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of policies aimed at redressing family needs.
  • Articulate the competing political and policy arguments on family policy.
  • Evaluate, generate, and present ideas to strengthen families.

WGS 393 • Family Policy

48030 • Fall 2014
Meets TH 900am-1200pm SRH 3.221

The primary goals of this course are to examine the demographic, economic, and social changes that have taken place in the family over the past several decades and to identify what these changes mean for public policies aimed at strengthening families.  We will address several questions, including: What has happened to the family?  How much help do families need and what type of help?  Who needs help the most?  How successful have policies been at helping families in the past?  What ought government do to help families?  Should government promote marriage?  The focus will primarily be on US federal family policy, but will also consider some state issues and comparative perspectives of policies and demographic changes. 

WGS 393 • Family Policy

47995 • Fall 2013
Meets TH 900am-1200pm SRH 3.355

The primary goals of this course are to examine the demographic, economic, and social changes that have taken place in the family over the past several decades and to identify what these changes mean for public policies aimed at strengthening families.  We will address several questions, including: What has happened to the family?  How much help do families need and what type of help?  Who needs help the most?  How successful have policies been at helping families in the past?  What ought government do to help families?  Should government promote marriage?  The focus will primarily be on US federal family policy, but will also consider some state issues and comparative perspectives of policies and demographic changes. 

Profile Pages


External Links



  • Center for Women's and Gender Studies

    University of Texas at Austin
    Burdine Hall 536
    2505 University Avenue, A4900
    Austin, Texas 78712
    512-471-5765