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Edmund T. Gordon, Chair 2109 San Jacinto Blvd , Mailcode E3400, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4362

Dorie J. Gilbert

Associate Professor Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin

Associate Professor of Sociology

Contact

Biography

Dorie J. Gilbert, Ph.D., L.M.S.W., is Associate Professor of Social Work and African, Women's & Gender Studies, and African American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research investigates the cognitive, behavioral, and developmental challenges for socially stigmatized populations, with a special focus on women and persons of color living with HIV or AIDS.

She has provided community-based counseling and advocacy for women living with HIV/AIDS, and has served as a consultant on several community-based funded projects. Her current project, Project Mother-Daughter Talk investigates the lives of young African American girls whose mothers are living with HIV/AIDS. Dr. Gilbert is co-editor of the book, African American Women and HIV/AIDS: Critical Responses. This book is unique in that it combines the intellectual with the practical, and represents academicians joining practitioners in an effort to reach multiple audiences through scholarly analyses of the problem and down-to-earth discussions of working solutions that meet the specific needs of African American women. The book is used in education and training for Africentric HIV-prevention programs, such as the Institute for the Advanced Studies of Black Family Life in Oakland, CA.

Dr. Gilbert has received funding to study the impact of race/ethnicity and cultural mistrust on antiretroviral medication adherence among HIV-positive individuals. She has additionally received HIV related research grants to conduct research on the life experiences of women living with HIV, AIDS service utilization among African American HIV-positive persons, and the psychosocial concerns HIV-positive parents with AIDS who have latency-age children. Her publications related to HIV/AIDS and vulnerable populations have appeared in journals and edited books. She is co-editor of the Journal of HIV/AIDS and Social Services.

Dr. Gilbert is married and enjoys traveling, gardening, and spending time with husband, Peter, and ten-year old, awesome daughter, Sarah. Sarah is a regular performer at the School's Fall Follies Talent Show.

Interests

Prevention and intervention with women and people of color living with HIV/AIDS, psychosocial adjustment in persons coping with social stigma, child and adolescent welfare and counseling, multicultural practice issues; and cultural diversity curriculum development.

AFR 374 • African American Family

30410 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm SSW 2.118
(also listed as WGS 340 )
show description

This course is designed to provide an overview of historical and contemporary issues facing African American families and children. Social service delivery to African American families and communities is emphasized. This course is an upper- division, social science elective and is open to BSW students as well as other majors and graduate students. Topics include:

* African Heritage and Cultural History

* Africentric Social Work Practice & Theories

* Gender, Sexuality and Relationships

* Family Patterns and Parenting

* Socialization in African American Families

* Adolescent Development & Racial Identity

II. Course Objectives

* Impact of Racism & Oppression

* Health and Mental Health Care & Disparities

* Faith-based and Community interventions

* Housing and Community Concerns

* Education and Employment

* Criminal Justice and Vulnerable Sub-populations

By the end of the semester, students will be able to:

1. Demonstrate an understanding of African American family structures and dynamics from a social systems perspective. 2. Demonstrate an understanding of the historical background of African American families and its impact on contemporary family life.

3. Demonstrate an understanding of the psychosocial dimensions of African American families.

4. Identify specific social issues facing African American males and females, children, families & other subsets of the population

5. Identify and describe the variety of life styles among African Americans and the situational determinants of different family forms and patterns of adaptation. 6. Identify barriers facing specific African American populations, including persons with disabilities, the elderly, women, gays and lesbians. 7. Critique the treatment of African American families in American scholarship.

9. Demonstrate an awareness of value dilemmas and policy initiatives that differentially affect African American families and diverse social service providers.

10. Promote social justice by recognizing and identifying ways to address discrimination against African Americans and other oppressed populations.

III. Teaching Methods

Lectures, class discussion, reading assignments, small group discussions and presentations will be utilized to achieve course objectives. Guest lecturers and films will provide supplementary learning resources. Lectures are designed to supplement readings. Students are expected to come prepared to each class and participate in discussions of assigned readings and of supplementary material presented in lectures.

AFR 374 • African American Family

30455 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm SSW 2.118
(also listed as AFR 374C, ANT 324L, WGS 340, WGS 340 )
show description

Fifty years after independence, Ghana has established new priorities around vigorous infrastructure development and enhanced social services and development, with special emphasis on education, child and family welfare, poverty reduction, and health promotion.  Through this course, students will gain a sound understanding of Ghanaian social work approaches to community and social development through social service delivery and community empowerment strategies which incorporate indigenous customs, institutions, and values.  Students will have the opportunity to examine the role of colonialism, cultural history and social policy in influencing the prevailing societal issues in Ghana and to explore various agency programs, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and indigenous projects that are actively responding to Ghana’s major social service needs.  The course will focus on community and social development across various areas, such as poverty, child and youth welfare, women and family services, health and disability services, housing and migration concerns, employment and technology development, and environmental protection in rural and urban Ghanaian communities. 
The course involves both experiential and classroom learning. During the four weeks, students will volunteer with various NGOs, social service agencies, and community-based organizations as well as meet with members of the Ghana Association of Social Workers and leading community providers. Students will be placed in agencies in the Greater Accra area. The course content will dovetail with the nature of community service in critical ways to ensure that 1) student learning is enhanced, 2) small-scale community needs are met, and 3) students are able to critically reflect upon their entire experience.
In addition, students will take part in educational excursions, such as tours of the Cape Coast slave fortresses, Catholic Action for Street Children’s Rural Farm Apprenticeship Project, the Village of Patriensa Computer Technology Training Center, and the Agogo Village Hospital and Environmental Activism Project in the country’s Ashanti region. The course combines lectures by faculty and local experts with journal reflections, field reports, and discussions that allow students to integrate their classroom-based work with their community-based volunteer projects.

AFR 374C • African American Family

30465 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm SSW 2.118
(also listed as AFR 374, ANT 324L, WGS 340, WGS 340 )
show description

Fifty years after independence, Ghana has established new priorities around vigorous infrastructure development and enhanced social services and development, with special emphasis on education, child and family welfare, poverty reduction, and health promotion.  Through this course, students will gain a sound understanding of Ghanaian social work approaches to community and social development through social service delivery and community empowerment strategies which incorporate indigenous customs, institutions, and values.  Students will have the opportunity to examine the role of colonialism, cultural history and social policy in influencing the prevailing societal issues in Ghana and to explore various agency programs, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and indigenous projects that are actively responding to Ghana’s major social service needs.  The course will focus on community and social development across various areas, such as poverty, child and youth welfare, women and family services, health and disability services, housing and migration concerns, employment and technology development, and environmental protection in rural and urban Ghanaian communities. 
The course involves both experiential and classroom learning. During the four weeks, students will volunteer with various NGOs, social service agencies, and community-based organizations as well as meet with members of the Ghana Association of Social Workers and leading community providers. Students will be placed in agencies in the Greater Accra area. The course content will dovetail with the nature of community service in critical ways to ensure that 1) student learning is enhanced, 2) small-scale community needs are met, and 3) students are able to critically reflect upon their entire experience.
In addition, students will take part in educational excursions, such as tours of the Cape Coast slave fortresses, Catholic Action for Street Children’s Rural Farm Apprenticeship Project, the Village of Patriensa Computer Technology Training Center, and the Agogo Village Hospital and Environmental Activism Project in the country’s Ashanti region. The course combines lectures by faculty and local experts with journal reflections, field reports, and discussions that allow students to integrate their classroom-based work with their community-based volunteer projects.

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