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Edmund T. Gordon, Chair 2109 San Jacinto Blvd , Mailcode E3400, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4362

Leonard N. Moore

Professor B.A., 1993, Jackson State University; Ph.D., 1998, The Ohio State University

Professor of History, Assistant Vice-President of the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement (DDCE)

AFR 317D • The Black Power Movement

30435 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 106
(also listed as HIS 317L )
show description

The Black Power movement was a distinct period from the late 1960s and early 1970s that emphasized racial pride and the creation of black political and cultural institutions to nurture and promote black collective interests and advance black values, and secure black autonomy. The range of black power ideology ranged from the desire to create an all-black nation-state to the promotion of black economic power. This course will look at the major organizations, key figures, and ideologies of the black power movement.

This course may be used to fulfill three hours of the U.S. history component of the university core curriculum and addresses the following four core objectives established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board: communication skills, critical thinking skills, personal responsibility, and social responsibility.

Texts:

Negroes with Guns by Robert F. Williams  (read: weeks 1-2)

Little X: Growing Up in the Nation of Islam by Tate (weeks 3-5)

Die, Nigger, Die by H. Rap Brown (weeks 6-8)

Assata: An Autobiography by Assata Shakur (weeks 9-11)

Carl Stokes and the Rise of Black Political Power by Leonard Moore (weeks 12-14)

Under the Influence by Erin Patton (week 15)

 

Grading:

Exams will be given approximately every five weeks and the group project is due at the end of the semester.

Exam 1: 25%

Exam 2: 25%

Exam 3: 25%

Group Project: 25%

AFR 317D • The Black Power Movement

30290 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 106
(also listed as HIS 317L )
show description

The Black Power movement was a distinct period from the late 1960s and early 1970s that emphasized racial pride and the creation of black political and cultural institutions to nurture and promote black collective interests and advance black values, and secure black autonomy. The range of black power ideology ranged from the desire to create an all-black nation-state to the promotion of black economic power. This course will look at the major organizations, key figures, and ideologies of the black power movement.

 

Texts:

Negroes with Guns by Robert F. Williams  (read: weeks 1-2)

Little X: Growing Up in the Nation of Islam by Tate (weeks 3-5)

Die, Nigger, Die by H. Rap Brown (weeks 6-8)

Assata: An Autobiography by Assata Shakur (weeks 9-11)

Carl Stokes and the Rise of Black Political Power by Leonard Moore (weeks 12-14)

Under the Influence by Erin Patton (week 15)

 

Grading:

Exams will be given approximately every five weeks and the group project is due at the end of the semester.

Exam 1: 25%

Exam 2: 25%

Exam 3: 25%

Group Project: 25%

AFR 317D • The Black Power Movement

30217 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 106
(also listed as HIS 317L )
show description

The Black Power movement was a distinct period from the late 1960s and early 1970s that emphasized racial pride and the creation of black political and cultural institutions to nurture and promote black collective interests and advance black values, and secure black autonomy. The range of black power ideology ranged from the desire to create an all-black nation-state to the promotion of black economic power. This course will look at the major organizations, key figures, and ideologies of the black power movement.

Required Books

Negroes with Guns by Robert F. Williams  (read: weeks 1-2)

The Autobiography of Malcolm X (weeks 3-5)

Black Power (weeks 6-8)

Assata: An Autobiography by Assata Shakur (weeks 9-11)

Black Theology and Black Power (weeks 11-13)

Do I Dare Disturb the Universe (Weeks 14-15)

 

Grading

Exams will be given approximately every five weeks and the group project is due at the end of the semester.

Exam 1: 30%

Exam 2: 30%

Exam 3: 35%

Engage Austin Service Project: 5%

This course partially fulfills the legislative requirement for American history.

AFR 317D • Black Power Movement

30160 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 106
(also listed as HIS 317L )
show description

The Black Power movement was a distinct period from the late 1960s and early 1970s that emphasized racial pride and the creation of black political and cultural institutions to nurture and promote black collective interests and advance black values, and secure black autonomy. The range of black power ideology ranged from the desire to create an all-black nation-state to the promotion of black economic power. This course will look at the major organizations, key figures, and ideologies of the black power movement.

Required Books

Negroes with Guns by Robert F. Williams  (read: weeks 1-2)

Little X: Growing Up in the Nation of Islam by Tate (weeks 3-5)

Die, Nigger, Die by H. Rap Brown (weeks 6-8)

Assata: An Autobiography by Assata Shakur (weeks 9-11)

Carl Stokes and the Rise of Black Political Power by Leonard Moore (weeks 12-14)

Under the Influence by Erin Patton (week 15)

Grading

Exams will be given approximately every five weeks and the group project is due at the end of the semester.

Exam 1: 25%

Exam 2: 25%

Exam 3: 25%

Group Project: 25%

This course partially fulfills the legislative requirement for American history. 

AFR F317D • African Amer Male In Society

81513 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am GAR 0.102
show description

This course will look at the historical and contemporary experiences

 of the African American Male with close attention paid to the period

 between 1970 and the present. In particular this course will examine

 the particular phenomenon of why many black males feel limited to one

 of four occupations: criminal, athlete, entertainer, and nigger.

Students will look at how traditional institutions and systems such as

 the penal system, the athletic industrial complex, the business of

 hip-hop, the educational system, and the ghetto, intersect with black male life.

AFR 317D • Black Power Movement

35255 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm WEL 1.308
(also listed as HIS 317L )
show description

The Black Power movement was a distinct period from the late 1960s and early 1970s that emphasized racial pride and the creation of black political and cultural institutions to nurture and promote black collective interests and advance black values, and secure black autonomy. The range of black power ideology ranged from the desire to create an all-black nation-state to the promotion of black economic power. This course will look at the major organizations, key figures, and ideologies of the black power movement.

Grading

Exams will be given approximately every five weeks and the group project is due at the end of the semester.
Exam 1: 25%
Exam 2: 25%
Exam 3: 25%
Group Project: 25%

Texts

Required Books
Negroes with Guns by Robert F. Williams  (read: weeks 1-2)
Little X: Growing Up in the Nation of Islam by Tate (weeks 3-5)

Die, Nigger, Die by H. Rap Brown (weeks 6-8)

Assata: An Autobiography by Assata Shakur (weeks 9-11)
Carl Stokes and the Rise of Black Political Power by Leonard Moore (weeks 12-14)

Under the Influence by Erin Patton (week 15)

AFR 317D • Contemporary Urban Issues

83418 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am JGB 2.218
show description

This course examines the physical, social and economic dimensions of the urban crises with an emphasis on minority communities in general and African American’s in particular. We will explore the dynamics of race and class in American cities.  An interdisciplinary approach will be used to study contemporary issues such as poverty, education, politics and police brutality.

AFR 317D • Black Power Movement

35710 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm WEL 1.308
(also listed as HIS 317L )
show description
   
                                                           Black Power Movement
                                                             AFR 317/HIS317
                                                                   Fall 2009
                                                           T/TH: 11:00-12:30
    


Dr. Leonard N. Moore                                                                             Garrison Hall 1.118
        
Course Description and Objectives
The Black Power movement was a distinct period from the late 1960s and early 1970s that emphasized racial pride and the creation of black political and cultural institutions to nurture and promote black collective interests and advance black values, and secure black autonomy. The range of black power ideology ranged from the desire to create an all-black nation-state to the promotion of black economic power. This course will look at the major organizations, key figures, and ideologies of the black power movement.

Required Books
Negroes with Guns by Robert F. Williams  (read: weeks 1-2)
    Little X: Growing Up in the Nation of Islam by Tate (weeks 3-5)
    Die, Nigger, Die by H. Rap Brown (weeks 6-8)
    Assata: An Autobiography by Assata Shakur (weeks 9-11)
    Carl Stokes and the Rise of Black Political Power by Leonard Moore (weeks 12-14)
    Under the Influence by Erin Patton (week 15)
    
Course Requirements
1. Attendance, preparation, and participation are essential. Prepare for class by reading the assigned text and participate in class discussions.
2. Your grade will be based on three exams and a group project.
3. Your group project requires you to produce a 10-page funding proposal for a community-based program that seeks to elevate the quality of life for low-income African Americans. Modeled after the Black Panther Party’s Community Survival Programs, this proposal will directly address many of the issues in East Austin. In addition to the 10-page proposal, your group is also required to produce a 5 minute documentary and a 3-minute podcast on your topic. Much more information regarding the group project will be forthcoming.

Course Grading
Exams will be given approximately every five weeks and the group project is due at the end of the semester.
Exam 1: 25%
Exam 2: 25%
Exam 3: 25%
Group Project: 25%
 

Schedule  
Week 1:    The 2nd Great Migration and the Foundations of Black Power                    
                Ghanaian Independence and the Global Dimensions of Black Power
Week 2:    Robert F. Williams and the Roots of Black Power       
                 Mae Mallory, Urbanization, and Internationalism               
Week 3:     Elijah Muhammad and the theology of the Nation of Islam
                 The Nation of Islam and the Emergence of Malcolm                   
Week 4:    The Ideology and Philosophy of Malcolm                            
                From Malcolm X to El Hajj Malik El-Shabazz
Week 5:    Max Stanford and the Birth of RAM                               
                The Watts Riots and Death of the Civil Rights Movement
Week 6:    Lowndes County                                       
                Oakland and The Birth of the Black Panthers
Week 7:     The Black Panther Party and State Repression                       
                 The Survival Programs of the Black Panther Party
Week 8:    US and the Development of Cultural Nationalism                       
                Amiri Baraka, Newark, and the Black Arts Movement
Week 9:    School Boycotts, Protests, and the Fight for Community Control                
                High School Students and the Black Power Movement
Week 10:   The Rise of Black Political Power                                
                 The 1972 Black National Political Convention
Week 11:    Black Power on Campus                                   
                The Development of Black Studies as an Academic Discipline
Week 12:     Albert Cleage and Black Christian Nationalism                       
                 Black Power and the Black Church
Week 13:    Black Capitalism and the Strive for Economic Empowerment          
                Rabbi David Hall and the McDonald’s Boycott   
Week 14:    Ali, The Black Power Movement and the Black Athlete                   
                 The 1968 Olympic Boycott
Week 15:     From Black Power to Pimp Juice                               
                  Conclusion

 

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